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Donít Let the Lights Go Out

PLN Sounds a Warning on Baliís Critical Electrical Supply

(6/15/2014) Plans to maintain Bali’s critical electrical supply, particularly to the southern regions of the island, may be sidetracked by delays and obstacles in the building of the world tallest high voltage crossing towers between Java and Bali (SUTT) and the full introduction of a new coal-drive electrical power generation plant at Celukan Bawang, North Bali.

This is a warning reported by The Bali Post and made by the general manager of the State Power Board (PT PLN) in Bali, Syamsul Huda, on Thursday, June 5, 2014.

Huda said the power crossing (SUTT) stretching 70 kilometers across the Straits between Java and Bali is nearing 85% completed. Certain that the crossing will do much to bolster Bali’s critically short power supply, the PLN manager warns that completion may be threatened by difficulties in securing land title for the remaining gigantic electrical towers needed to finish the product.

The installation of two remaining towers in Tabanan, West Bali, without which it will be problematic to distribute power supplied from Java to the main electrical power consumption areas of Bali.

Delays in constructing power towers in Tabanan will also affect the ability to send power generated at Celukan Bawang to Bali’s South.

The Celukan Bawang Power Plant is expected to provide 390 megawatts of much-needed additional power for Bali.

Bali’s current power supply is limited to 890 MW with peak consumption in 2014 recorded at 735 MW on April 24, 2104. Meanwhile, Bali’s powers demand is increasing at a rate of 8.5 percent per year, meaning Bali could find itself unable to meet peak power demand in as little as 2 years unless more power is added to the grid.

To help build more redundancy into Bali’s power grid two new underwater power cables from Java to Bali – each capable of carrying 100 MW are expected to come on line in June 2014.