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Honoring the Badge

Bali Police Asked to Improve Poor Image by Pursuing High-Profile Corruption Cases

(9/21/2013) The Bali Post cites that corruptions is on the increase in Bali, calling for the recent appointment of Brigadier General Julius Benny Mokalu as the Island’s new Chief of Police to provide an impetus to improve the image of the Bali police by bringing a new aggressiveness to the style in which criminal corruption cases are handled.

The Bali Post
declared that a new commitment must be found to improve the current image of the police as the most corrupt agency of the government.

The chairman of the NGO National Committee to the Rescue of National Assets (Komnas PAN) in Klungkung, Made Raka Adnyana, said on Friday September 20, 2013, that the police force in Bali must find the courage to change their corrupt image. He said this could be achieved by being bolder in handling unsolved major cases. Regardless of the details and those involved in any corruption case, the police must be proactive in their enforcement in order to restore public faith in the Bali police.

Making his point, Adnyana added: “It’s like the case in Klungkung for the pier at Gunaksa. There were indications of corruptions since 2007. Only after the prosecutors took charge in 2013 did the Bali Police Headquarters rush to begin to investigate the case. Confusion resulted.”

This was also confirmed by Made Raja who told The Bali Post how the police only called him to give a statement in the Gunaksa case after prosecutors had begun busily investigating the matter. Made Raja said the police in Bali must be more aggressive and intensive in handling cases, particularly large-scale corruption cases.

Raja added that police were merely trying to achieve a targeted number of cases by selectively pursuing only smaller cases involving village chiefs, subak heads and other small fry. He warned that this course of action by the police would do nothing to change the very poor image of the police.

The anti-corruption movement in the regency of Tabanan is also looking hopefully to the change of command in the Bali police in order to clear the backlog of long-neglected cases. That was the hope  expressed by the coordinator of the Movement for Public Morality (GMT), Ketut Semadha Putra, shared with the press on Friday, September 20, 2013.

Semadha called on Bali’s new chief of police to be more proactive in solving a number of corruption cases, including suspicions of subterfuge surrounding plans for the reclamation of Benoa Bay; the pier project at Gunaksa in Klungkung; and irregularities in the construction of housing for government employees in Tabanan. Semadha also cited the case of land acquisition for the Nyitdah International Hospital project.

Semadha added: ”With the new chief of police, we hope for stronger law enforcement against corruption. Let there be an end to the reluctance to take action.”