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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #1007 - 21 December 2015

IN THIS UPDATE


An Honor Declined
Why Bali Discovery Refused a Tourism Award for Excellence.

Bali Discovery Tours – the company who owns Bali Update – received a communication in early December from a company identifying itself as The Center for Indonesian Presentation (Pusat Prestasi Indonesia) with the website www.penghargaanindonesia.com announcing that following a review by a select committee, references and an examination of our operations we had been awarded a “Tourism Industry Award for Excellence 2015.

At once, humbled and excited that our team’s hard work was receiving some well-deserved recognition, we read on. The letter notifying us of the award included an invitation to attend an award ceremony in Surabaya on December 18, 2015, where our company representative would be given a certificate and a gold pin. Reading further, we were offered a range of table seating options at the award ceremony ranging in price from Rp. 7.7 million to Rp. 18.5 million. And, while we had our checkbook out, we could also sign up for 5 pages of vanity press coverage in the official program (Rp. 5.5 million) and advance order photos and videos (Rp. 750,000).

Sensing that something was seriously amiss, we wrote the organizers thanking them for the unsolicited and unexpected honor, but advised that previous engagements would prevent our attendance in Surabaya on December 18th. We therefore asked that our award and pin be mailed to our office.

Showing great efficiency, we received an immediate response advising that our certificate, pin and entry on the register of honorees would be sent after we remitted a payment at the special discounted price of Rp.5 million.

In the end, we told the organizers we would not be sending the requested payment and suggested they pass “our” award on to the next highest bidder.

There is no honor or prestige in the sham and pretense of purchasing awards – a practice that has sadly become all too common in Indonesia’s tourism industry.

Honors are now regularly bestowed on individuals and companies declared the best in their class that, when the winners are announced, cause colleagues’ eyes to roll increduously. Those of us working in the industry have an basic professional instinct on product excellence, making many of us react in disbelief when the names of tourism awards winners are announced, 

And, when awards are not sold outright in the manner just outlined, there is another method of award recognition based on votes cast and recruited over the social network. In this instance, while the award may be given on the pretext of being the “best hotel” or “best restaurant” the only thing that is truly measured is the subject company's skill at online cheerleading where Facebook friends, Twitter followers and others are urge to cast a vote in frenzied idolatory support. 

Think of this as a self-deceiving game of  "mirror, mirror on the wall" practiced over the Internet.

Sadly, gone are the days when awards were given to worthy recipients based a bona fide selection process led by respected leaders in their respective fields.

A woman who spent her enitre professional life on a street corners and nearby motels once shared her personal view that “money can’t by love.

She was right. Money also can't serve as substitute for hard work, quality and professionalism.


BBTF 2016 Gets an Executive Director
Bali and Beyond Travel Fair Appoints Justina Puspawati an Executive Director

The organizers of the Bali and Beyond Tourism Fair 2016 (BBTF 2016) have appointed Justina Puspawati as executive director in charge of all fair-related initiatives and strategic business developments.

Justina Puspawati brings a wealth of travel industry experience and leadership to her new role. With more than 25 years of experience in hospitality and the tourism industry, Justina Puspawati has work in operations, hotel development, tourism destination development and promotion, sales marketing and promotion, revenue management, hotel openings, organizational effectiveness, and training and talent development.

A graduate from Ohio State University, she started her career in New York City and had been worked with Hyatt International, Mandarin Oriental Hotel Groups, Starwood and The InterContinental Hotel Group.

Her last position prior to opening her own consultancy - JPHplus was as managing director Smailing Tour Bali.

The Bali & Beyond Travel Fair will take place in Bali June 23-26, 2016.

Bali and Beyond Travel Fair Website


Home for the Holidays
Perth Man Receives Lenient Prison Sentence in the Negligent Homicide of a Balinese Motorcyclist

An Australian, Joshua Terelinck ,(33) was sentenced by the Court in Bali to 2.5 months in jail on Wednesday, December 15, 2015, for his role in the death of Indonesian man he struck while riding a motorcycle in Bali the early hours of July 9, 2015.

The Balinese man injured in the crash died several days later with a blood clot on the brain.

Terelinck has paid Rp. 55 million in compensation to the dead man’s family, causing the victim’s father to tell the court that they considered the tragedy at an end.

With time deducted for days spent in incarceration awaiting trial, Terelinck is scheduled for release from prison on December 22, 2015, permitting him to fly back to Perth in time to spend the holidays with his family.

Both Terelinck and State Prosecutors signaled they would accept the Court’s verdict and not appeal the verdict or sentence handed down.


Brutes’ Brutal Endings
Street Gang Violence Leaves Four Dead and Many Injured at Kerobokan Prison and in Bali’s Capital of Denpasar

At least four deaths have been linked to a prison riot at Bali’s Kerobokan Prison that overflowed in surrounding areas of Denpasar on Thursday evening, December 17, 2015.

The prison battle that precipitated the evening of violence was between to members of separate local gangs (ormas) in over a missing hand phone in which two of the combatants were fatally stabbed.

This was followed by street battles between the non-imprisoned members of the two groups at various locations in Denpasar that saw vehicles damaged and another two people killed.

The State News Agency Antara said the street battles took place in several locations, including Jalan Teuku Umar, send large numbers of wounded gang members to Denpasar’s Sanglah Hospital. Pitched battles also took place on Jalan Mahendrata and in Renon.

The two dead inmates have been identified as Robot and Dore, while the two people who died in street battles have yet to be formally identified.

Five people are in intensive care at the Sanglah General Hospital with knife and sword wounds.


Canberra’s Lady in Denpasar
Australia Appoints New Consul-General to Bali: Dr. Helena Studdert

Australian career diplomat Dr. Helena Studdert will assume the job of Consul-General in Bali at the Australian Consulate in Bali commencing in January 2016.

Dr. Studdert will replace the popular and hard-working Consul-General Majell Hind who has served in Bali since 2014, including the trying days of providing consular support to the two members of the Bali Nine and their families during the April 29, 2015 executions of Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran.

Dr. Studdert holds a degree in Foreign Affairs and Trade from Monash University, with a Bachelors degree and Ph. D from the University of New South Wales.

Nearly one million Australians visit Bali each year, making the Denpasar Consulate the third busiest post in providing consular services to Australian travelers and residents in Bali.

Studdert’s last posting was as International Adviser to the Australian-Civil Military Centre. Previous postings include as a Counselor at the Australian High Commission in Welllington (2003-2005) and Ambassador to Serbia (2010-2013). Canberra postings include as Director, Ministerial and Executive Liaison Section (2000-2003); Director APEC Task Force (2005-2008); and Director, Consular Information Section (2008-2010).


And the Envelope, Please . . .
Indonesia Travel & Tourism Award Recipient 2015/2016

The Indonesia Travel and Tourism Award 2015/2016 (ITTA) were presented to 48 winners named as the best in the Indonesian tourism industry at a gala award dinner held at the Ritz-Carlton Jakarta on Monday, December 14, 2015.

Many Bali-based tourism companies were awarded at this year’s ITTA ceremony.

The ITTA 2015/2016 Winners:
  1. Indonesia’s Leading Airport Hotel Hotel - Zest Airport Jakarta by Swiss-Belhotel International
  2. Indonesia’s Leading Boutique Hotel - The Magani Hotel & Spa, Bali
  3. Indonesia’s Leading Business Hotel -  JW Marriott Hotel Jakarta
  4. Indonesia’s Leading City Hotel - Hotel Borobudur Jakarta 
  5. Indonesia’s Leading Lifestyle Hotel - ARTOTEL Thamrin – Jakarta
  6. Indonesia’s Leading Design Hotel - Atria Hotel Gading Serpong
  7. Indonesia’s Leading Green Hotel - The Sultan Hotel & Residence
  8. Indonesia’s Leading Youth Hotel - Centra Taum Seminyak, Bali
  9. Indonesia’s Leading Luxury Hotel - The Ritz-Carlton Jakarta, Mega Kuningan
  10. Indonesia’s Leading 5 Star Hotel - JW Marriott Hotel Jakarta
  11. Indonesia’s Leading 4 Star Hotel - THE HAVEN Bali Seminyak
  12. Indonesia’s Leading Global Hotel Chain - Swiss-Belhotel International
  13. Indonesia’s Leading Local Hotel Chain - Topotels Hotels & Resorts
  14. Indonesia’s Leading Local Hotel Chain - Parador Hotels & Resorts
  15. Indonesia’s Leading Lifestyle Hotel - Chain PHM Hospitality
  16. Indonesia’s Leading MICE Venue -  Crowne Plaza Semarang
  17. Indonesia’s Leading New MICE Venue - Discovery Hotel & Convention Ancol  -  Balai Sidang Jakarta Convention Center
  18. Indonesia’s Leading Serviced Apartments. & Suite  - Fraser Residence Menteng Jakarta
  19. Indonesia’s Hotel Of The Year  - The Ritz-Carlton Jakarta, Mega Kuningan
  20. Indonesia’s Leading Beach Resort - Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel
  21. Indonesia’s Leading Family Resort - The Westin Resort Nusa Dua Bali
  22. Indonesia’s Leading Golf Resort - Le Grande Bali Uluwatu
  23. Indonesia’s Leading Island Resort Bali The Sandi Phala Resort, Kuta
  24. Indonesia’s Leading Luxury Resort - The St. Regis Bali Resort
  25. Indonesia’s Leading Spa Resort - Thee Villas Bali Hotel & Spa
  26. Indonesia’s Leading Thematic Resort - Alaya Resort Bud, Bali
  27. Indonesia’s Leading Boutique Resort - Bali Niksoma Boutique Beach Resort
  28. Indonesia’s Resort Of The Year-  Viceroy Bali
  29. Indonesia’s Leading Romantic Villa-  Kayumanis Ubud Private Villa & Spa
  30. Indonesia’s Leading Luxury Villa - Samabe Bali Suites & Villas
  31. Indonesia’s Villa Of The Year - Kayumanis Jimbaran Private Estate & Spa
  32. Indonesia’s Leading Tourism Show - Bali Agung Show
  33. Indonesia’s Leading Cruise Operator - Scoot Fast Cruises
  34. Indonesia’s Leading Theme Park - Bali Safari & Marine Park
  35. Indonesia’s Leading Independent Spa - Prana Spa, Seminyak, Bali
  36. Indonesia’s Leading Tour Operator - Destination Asia Indonesia
  37. Indonesia’s Leading Inbound Travel Agent - HIS Travel
  38. Indonesia’s Leading Outbound Travel Agent -  Panorama Tour
  39. Indonesia’s Leading Online Travel Agent - JauhDekat.com
  40. Indonesia Leading Coach/Bus Company - White Horse Group
  41. Indonesia’s Leading Taxi/Limousine Company-  Blue Bird Group
  42. Indonesia’s Leading International Airline - Turkish Airlines
  43. Indonesia’s Leading International Low Cost Airline - AirAsia
  44. Indonesia’s Leading Low Cost Airline - Citilink
  45. Indonesia’s Leading Regional Airline - SilkAir
  46. Indonesia’s Leading Business Class Airline - Emirate Airlines
  47. Indonesia’s Airline Of The Year- Garuda Indonesia


A Mis-Application of the Law?
Ministry of Transportation Bans Transport Providers Using Online Applications But Rescinds Ban After President Intervenes

The proliferation of transportation companies driven by online applications has not escaped the notice of Indonesia’s Minister of Transportation, Ignasius Jonan, who took the action on Thursday, December 17, 2015, of declaring Go-Jek, Grab Bike, Blu-Jek, Lady-Jed, UBER Taksi, Grab Car and Go-Box as illegal and not in accordance with a 2009 Law on Street Transport.

As reported by Detik.com, a spokesman for the Ministry of Transportation, JA Barata, said the laws being broken by the online transport companies put the companies and their clients in danger due to safety concerns. Citing Go-Jek and similar operations that offer rides to paying customers as pillion passengers, Barata said that the regulations do not allowed taxi services for secondary motorcycle passengers.

“Go-JeK and its ilk have already proclaimed themselves as passenger service providers. But, in fact, the laws on traffic clearly state that two-wheeled vehicles are not allowed serve as passenger vehicles. Therefore this type of transport can not be used in transactions or for pay,” said Barata.

Meanwhile, others are accusing the Ministry of selective enforcement by outlawing the well-organized online application transport services while turning a blind eye to the informal economy rife with ojek services.

Protests against the Ministry’s decision were loud, widespread and instantaneous from the myriad of users of the online transportation providers.

Objections to the Ministry of Transportation’s ruling quickly reached the office of Indonesian President Joko Widodo who persuaded the Minister on Friday morning to rescind his call for police to suit down the vehicle-hailing services using online applications.

Speaking to the press a short time later and quoted by The Jakarta Globe, Jonan said: "Public transport cannot fulfill public demand, especially in the Greater Jakarta area," Jonan told reporters. "Therefore, [online hailing apps] can be the temporary solution until public transport is improved." 

Jonan is said, however, to be steadfast in his prohibition against the car-hailing segment of the mobile application such as UBER and Grab-Taxi that he still wants to see banned from operating in Indonesia.

Following the brouhaha and embarrassingly retreat, Jonan and the President want the 2009 Traffic Law revised to contemplate the rapid change to public transport precipitated by technological innovations.


Prisoner Exchange
110 Prisoner Moved in Middle of Night from Kerobokan Prison Following Violent Riot

Kompas.com reports that following the violence on Thursday, December 17, 2016 at Bali’s Kerobokan prison and the aftermath that caused four deaths and numerous injuries, a decision was made to move 110 prisoners from the overcrowded prison to other detention facilities on the Island.

“A total of 110 prisoners have been moved. This was done out of consideration for security,” said the head of prisons from the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights for Bali, Putra Surya.

Putra explained that the 110 convicts were move to the Tabanan Prison (15), Bangli Prison (10), Klungkung Prison (20), Karangasem Prison (15) and the new Narcotics Prisons in Bangli (50).

Prison officials wasted no time in making the transfers with buses and escorts arriving near midnight on Thursday to shift the prisoners.

The 110 prisoners move to new locations all originated form Cell Block C – the location of the violent prison riot earlier in the day.

Related Article

Brute’s Brutal Ending


When Size Matters
West Bali Lobster Fishermen Put Out of Business by New ‘Legal Catch’ Rules

Traditional fishermen working from Yeh Gangga Beach in Tabanan, West Bali, are in dire financial straits and bemoaning their fate as they enter into the season in which they would normally reap strong incomes from lobster harvesting.

As reported by Beritabali.com, at the root of the fishermen’s dilemma is a recent ban from the Ministry of Maratime Affairs and Fisheries (KKP) forbidding the export of lobsters weighing less than 200 grams.

A Ministerial Decree issued by Minister Susi Pudjiastuti stipulates that only lobsters, crabs and Flower Crabs (Portunus pelagicus) weighing more than 200 grams are “legal catches” that can be landed by Indonesian fishermen.

Prior to the Ministerial Decree, Tabanan fishermen were able to sell 100 gram lobsters for Rp. 400,000 a kilogram with a daily catch of these “undersized” lobsters yielding an income of Rp. 400,0000 to Rp. 1.2 million a day.

The problem is made more acute by the fact that the lobster traps used by Tabanan’s traditional fishermen are best suited to capturing lobsters weighing between 100-150 grams, a size now branded as an illegal catch under Indonesian law.

But with the size limitation on lobster catches, fishermen say they are unable to secure catches sufficient to pay the operating costs of going to sea.
 


When Made Men Make Up
Laskar Bali and Balakida ‘Mass Organizations’ Sign Peace Accord Witnessed by Provincial Chief of Police

Beritabali.com reports that an emergency meeting convened by police between two “mass organizations” following violent clashes that resulted in at least four deaths has resulted in a peace accord between the warring factions.

Leaders of Laskar Bali and Baladika met at Police Headquarters in Denpasar on Friday, December 18, 2015, where they signed a legal contract over government stamps pledging to strive for peace and refrain from further conflict.The leaders of the two organizations publicly expressed their embarrassment for what has transpired over the past few days and promised to create bonds of friendship between rival organizations in order to avoid future incidents.

Euphemistically termed “mass organizations” – at least one of the warring parties has been described by Rocketnews24 and merdeka.com as one of Asia’s most dangerous criminal gangs earning income from extorting “protection” money from local business. Kathryn Bonella, in her book “Snowing in Bali,” outlines the workings of Laskar Bali, accusing the police and local media as too frightened to discuss or disclose the group’s inner workings.

In a rare public display, the leadership of of Laskar Bali and Baladika made a public and written expression of regret orchestrated by the Provincial Chief of Police, General Sugeng Priyanto. The apology and peace agreement was signed by Ketut Pura Ismaya Jaya as Secretary-General of Laskar Bali and Kutut Sukarta as the Secretary of Baladika Bali.

Speaking at the signing ceremony, Ketut Pura Ismaya Jaya, speaking on behalf of Laskar Bali said: “Allow me to apologize. This incident was not what we desired. We also express our condolences to our friends in Baladika who have suffered a disaster. Essentially, we do not want for incidents to occur that violate the law. Indeed, such an event has taken place and we now commend the matter to law enforcement.”

Continuing, Ismaya Jaya said: “We do not want (other) mass organization to become our competitors. I am also embarrassed as we wish to safeguard Bali. We are prepared to accept the moral consequences (for our actions) from the public.”

A member of Laskar Bali’s Advisory Council, A.A. Suma Widana, added that he regretted the recent outbreaks and prayed similar incident would not reoccur. “We deeply regret and hope that incidents like this do not happen again. We are ready to build fellowship (with other mass organizations), where understanding of the rules and regulations are not fully understood on the grass root level,” said Widana.

Ketut Sukarta, speaking on behalf of Baladika Bali, expressed his thanks for the expressions of condolences extended by the leaders of Laskar Bali. Sukarta also took the opportunity to extend his apologies to the public, saying: “I apologize to the people of Denpasar who have been made to feel frightened and ill at ease. We do not want this to widen. We surrender the process completely to the police to handle in an equitable manner. We are prepared to help to explain this to our members.”


The Most Generous Miss DeGeneres
Ellen DeGeneres Gives Away a Week-Long Holiday in Bali to Hundreds of People in Her Studio Audience

On the 18 December 2015 airing of the U.S.-based Ellen DeGeneres TV Show celebrating “12 Days of Giveaway,” the famous TV host shocked hundreds of people sitting in her studio audience with the announcement that they had just won a 7-day 6-night stay at the Mulia Resort in Bali, Indonesia.

As explained by Ellen to her screaming and incredulous audience, they would holiday for a week at The Mulia, Mulia Resort & Villas in Bali at a resort named the #1 Beach Resort in Asia and the #3 Best Hotel in the World by Conde Nast Travelers 2014 Readers Choice Awards.


The Ellen DeGeneres Show is a nationally televised American talk show hosted by actress and comedian Ellen DeGeneres. On air since 2003, the program has won 35 Daytime Emmy Awards and enjoys a strong audience following both in the United States and wherever it is broadcast abroad.

See the audience reaction learning that a Bali holiday was in their future.


Sleighs by Boeing and Airbus
180 Extra Flights and 34,508 Extra Seats for Bali Travelers Over the Christmas and New Years Holidays.

NusaBali reports that a number of domestic airlines serving Bali will add 180 extra flights over the coming Christmas and New Year’s Holiday period.

The general manager of the Bali Airport Authority (Angkasa Pura I), Rai Trikora Hardjo, said on Friday, December 18, 2015, “All (of these flights) are between Denpasar and Jakarta.”

Requesting the greatest number of extra flights over the holiday period is Citilink with 88 flights followed by Lion Air with 68 flights.

The additional seats represented by the extra flights totals 34,508.

Trikora Hardjo said the additional flights represent a 55% increase in additional flight requests over Christmas and New Year in 2014/2015.

To facilitate the rush of additional passengers, Angkasa Pura I have set up a special coordinating post (Posko) and help center located in the public area of the domestic terminal. The Posko will remain in operation until January 8, 2015.

Staffing the Posko will be personnel form Angkasa Pura I, the Airport Authority, the Air Force, Police and Airport Health officers.


Certifiably Green
Bali’s Airport Earns ISO 14001 Certification for Environmental Sustainability

The State News Agency Antara reports that Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport has become the sole air gateway in Indonesian to win ISO 14001:2004 Certification for environmental management.

Describing the ISO 14001 Certification, Wendo Asrul Rose, the operation director of PT Angkasa Pura who manage Bali’s airport, said, “ISO 14001:2004 is an international standard for management of the environment in order to minimize the negative impact of airport operations on the cleanliness of the air, water, noise levels and the surrounding soil.”

ISO 14001 Certification was granted to Bali’s airport by PT Superintending Company of Indonesia (Sucofindo) on December 7, 2015.

Certification focuses on the management of a facility to protect the environment and make the airport’s operation more sustainable. 17 separate operational elements are addressed in the review for ISO Certification.

Following Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport certification, Angkasa Pura is working to achieve similar status for the Juanda Airport in Surabaya and the Sultan Aji Muhammad Sulaiman Sepinggan Airport in Balikpapan.


Aussie Dollar in Need of a Kangaroo Bounce
Weak Australian Dollar Fueling Boom in Australian Domestic Travel and Lackluster Performance in Ozzie Arrivals to Bali

Traveldailynews.asia.com reports that a declining Australian dollar is contributing to increases in domestic travel in Australia, also explaining why Ozzies may be staying closer to home when taking holidays.

Tourism Research Australia (TRA) results for 12-months through the end of September 2015 show a 7% growth in domestic overnight trips totaling 85.3 million, resulting in a 5% increase in total nights to 318 million and a 6% growth in spending to $56.9 billion.

Overall, the number of room nights purchased at Australian hotels, motels and resorts has increased 10% to 80.2 million.

The falling value of the Australian dollar is cited as the reason for a 1% drop in overseas travel, after a remarkable period of growth in overseas travel of 132% between 2006 and 2014. In fact, Australia has recorded its first drop in the number residents taking an overseas trip since 2003.

This is also reflected in Australian arrivals to Bali that have gone largely flat in recent months after several years of strong growth.

The weaker Australian dollar is, at the same time, making an Australian holiday more affordable for foreign travelers.



 


And the Tide Rushes Inn From the Sea to the Shore
Indonesia May Lose 2,000 Islands and 42 million Shoreline Homes by 2050 Due to Climate Change and Rising Sea Levels

Achmad Poernomo, an expert assigned to Indonesia’s Ministry of Maritime Affair and Fisheries, is warning of the direct effects of climate change and rising seas.

As reported by Metrobali.com, Poernomo, speaking at the Graduate School of Gadjah Mada University in Yogyakarta on Wednesday, December 16, 2015, said, “According to experts, by 2050 sea levels will rise 90 centimeters with the potential of submerging 2,000 small islands in Indonesia.”

“A rising sea level is just one of the risks resulting from climate change,” warned Poernomo. In addition to the possibility that 2,000 Indonesian islands may disappear by 2050, there is the additional risk that 42 million homes located on Indonesian shorelines may disappear below the waves.

Poernomo said that climate change will also bring uncertainty in predicting the change of the seasons, affect the seasonal migration of sea life and may also result in massive die-offs of fish species.

The maritime expert said advance planning must be put in place with a greater emphasis on sustainable development.

Poernomo, who is the chairman of the Disaster Management Faculty at Gadjah Mada University, said that 85% of all disasters in Indonesia are connected to climate change. While, at the same time, the number of Indonesians trained in disaster management renaubs minimal. This situation is made even more acute by the limited amount of funding by regional governments set aside for disaster preparedness and disaster relief.


Take a Short Cut to Bali’s North
Minister of Public Works Endorses Proposal for a Singaraja to Bedugul Short-Cut Highway

Proposals to build a toll road connecting Seririt – Soka Tabanan, a shortcut road connecting Singaraja – Bedugul Tabanan, and a road link between Kubutambahan and Jalan Ida Bagus Mantra in the Badung Regency are the earnest hopes of the people of Buleleng, North Bali as critical steps in fostering development in their region.

As reported by Metrobali.com, the desire for better road access between Bali’s North and South has received a positive response from the Ministry of Public Works (Kemen PU) who has asked the Regional Road-Planning Agency (BPJN) to expeditiously coordinate the project.

The Minister of Public Works, Pera Basuki Hadimuljono, said, “The request from the Regent of Buleleng, Putu Agus Suradnyana, for a short cut between Singaraja and Bedugul should be realized and acted upon by BPJN.”

Endorsing the request of the Regent and the support for the Singaraja – Bedugul road from the Minister of Public Works, the chairman of the Buleleng House of Representatives (DPRD-Buleleng), Gede Supriatna, said he felt the Regent’s proposal was of vital importance to the development of North Bali.

Supriatna said: “The development of the economy and tourism in Buleleng is lagging behind the rest of Bali, a fact that is connected with problems of access on the twisting and winding road between Singaraja and Denpasar via Bedugul. This means a trip that can now take 2.5 hours could be reduced by 1.5 hours. If the shortcut road can be built, I am certain that the development of the economy and tourism can be improved.”

Supriatna said the cost of the shortcut road is estimated at Rp. 2.7 trillion, with the government of Buleleng prepared to contribute 10% of this amount to secure the needed right of ways for the road.

Information supplied by BPJN reveals that plans are under discussion to build a 65-kilomter long shortcut between Singaraja and Bedugul in ten sections. The next step in the project process is the formulation of a detailed engineering design.
 


Can Donald Duck This?
Will Anti-Moslem Statements by U.S. Presidential Hopeful Donald Trump Derail His Company’s Plans to Manage Two Major Tourism Resorts in Indonesia?

Like much of the world, Indonesia has reacted with dismay and outrage at statements made by U.S. presidential hopeful Donald Trump saying, if elected, he would ban the entry of all foreign Muslims into the U.S.A. and put mosques in his country under surveillance.

The chairman of the Islamist United Development Party (PPP), Muhammad Romahurmuziny (Romi), has condemned Trump’s pronouncements as misleading and laden with racism and prone to increase intolerance between religious groups.

As reported by Republika.co.id, Romi has called on Donald Trump to openly apologize and correct his anti-Moslem statements. If, however, Trump fails to apologize the PPP Chairman urges all Indonesians, regardless of their religious belief, to reject anyl investments by Donald Trump or his companies in Indonesia.

Romi made his call for a rejection of Trump’s projects and investment in Indonesia on Thursday, December 10, 2015.

Romi said that Indonesia, as the largest Moslem nation in the world, causes the PPP to urge all the rejection of Trump investments until Donald Trump offers an unconditional apology.

Romi suggests that while Indonesian needs foreign investment, the Country cannot tolerate investments from individuals who fail to show a friendly countenance to the people of Indonesia.

The PPP has called for the rejection of Trump’s investments in any form in Indonesia.

Romi expressed the opinion that it would be a mistake for a great nation, like the United States, to elect a person like Donald Trump as its President. He said that in the midst of growing global radicalism, America needs a leader who is friendly to the followers of every religion.

Joining the PPP protest against Trump is the Indonesian Ulema Council, representing many Islamic clerics in Indonesia, who have branded Trump as having “no brain” and guilty of making “primitive statements.”

Yenny Wahid, an Islamic activist and daughter of the late Indonesian President Abdurrahman Wahid (Gus Dur) said: “I think the perspective of people here in Indonesia is that they see Donald Trump as a loser. We don’t really take his comments seriously.”

Joining the discussion, Alissa Wahid, another daughter of Gus Dur, accused Trump of using “Islamphobia” as a political commodity saying Trump is showing his “true colors.” Adding: “The joke is on him, but he plays a dangerous game. If he wouldn’t retract his words, I would support a campaign to boycott his business in Indonesia.”

The Trump Hotel Collection, according to the Company’s website, is reportedly participating in the management of two tourist resorts in Indonesia with Indonesia’s MNC Group.

Trump Hotel Collection will manage a 700-hectare Lido Lakes Development in West Java that include a luxury resort, 18-hole championship golf course, country club, wellness spa and a residential development.

The West Java development is the second Indonesian project announced by the Trump organization after plans were made public to manage a resort in Tabanan, Bali at the current Nirwana Hotel and Golf Resort

Given Donald Trump’s recent anti-Moslem pronouncements  as he runs for the U.S. presidency, it remains unclear if MNC, Donald Trump or the Indonesian public may now be reconsidering the wisdom of any project involving the billionaire businessman in a Country with the world’s largest Moslem population.


Bandiasa to the Helm
Harper Kuta Bali Hotel Welcomes New General Manager

Harper Kuta Bali Hotel has appointed Nyoman Bandisa Sastika as general manager, effective December 2015.

In his new role, Bandisa will be responsible for overseeing the operation of the hotel, ensuring the optimal level of guest and employee satisfaction as well as profitability.

Bandisa has more than 15 years of hotel experience, starting as an activities coordinator in the 1980’s, and gradually progressing through the ranks before his current position at Harper Kuta Bali Hotel.

Born and raised in Mataram, Lombok, Bandisa earned an Undergraduate of Finance Degree from Indonesian State College of Accountancy (STAN).

Commenting on his appointment, Bandisa said: “Joining to Harper Kuta Bali Hotel feels like the perfect next step for me. My own values blend seamlessly with the value system of Harper Kuta, and I look forward to overseeing this modern hotel together with the team.”

In his spare time, Bandisa enjoys reading and playing guitar.


Walk a Mile in Their Shoes
Solemen Channels New Shoes, Rice and Bedding to a Needy Community in Denpasar

Solemen Indonesia Foundation continues to play its vital role of coordinating the goodwill of the larger Indonesian community to the benefit of those most in need in Bali.

On December 14, 2015, Solemen in cooperation with Indosol, hotel partners and others member of the community delivered much-needed shoes, bedding and towels to the villagers of Waribang in Sanur.

Indosole provided rice and 50 pairs of adult footwear, while the Bali Dynasty Resort provided 111 towels and 50 bed sheets. Many of the villagers of Waribang work as pemulung or trash collectors, earning their living by collecting plastic bottles and other refuse to be sold to recycling centers.

According to one Waribang resident, one kilogram of plastic yields Rp. 3,000 (approximately US$ 0.21) when sold to a rectcling center.

Perhaps because of their role of the recycling supply chain, the Waribang community members receiving footwear from Indosole’s seemed most impressed that their attractive shoes were made from recycled, discarded tires.

Solemen regularly distribute food and clothing to many needy villages around Bali in addition to their ongoing work encompassing medical assessments, aid, provision of physiotherapy, nutrition and a host of other humanitarian services.

Solemen Indonesia Website


Waist Deep in the Big Muddy
Denpasar Residents Suffer Seasonal Flooding Made Worse by Drains Clogged with Trash

The rains have commenced in Bali’s capital of Denpasar and with it flooding has inundated hundreds of home, mostly in areas inhabited by the City’s lest financially unempowered.

Heavy rains returned to Bali on Tuesday, December 15, 2015, lasting for three hours from 9:00 am until 12 noon. As a result, floodwaters flowed through Jalan Merpati near Batukaru, Gang Padang, Perumnas Monang Maning, Banjar Busung Yeh Kauh, Pemecutan Kelod and other areas of West Denpasar. More than 100 homes and boarding houses submerged in waist-deep rainwater.

Quoted by NusaBali, Ahmad, a resident on Jalan Merpati, said that while this is the third time his home has suffered flood damage, this year’s flooding represents the most destructive.

Much of the flooding is blamed on drains clogged with trash and garbage. As the result, the floodwaters flowing past and through Denpasar homes carried both flotsam and jetsam comprised of plastic trash, lumber, uprooted trees, mattresses and living room sofas.

Suddenly aware of the consequences of throwing trash into open gutters, the day after the flooding, citizen groups and municipal workers were busily cleaning drainage ditches in anticipation of the rains to come.


Enjoy the Fireworks
Local Government in Probolinggo Says it’s Still Safe to Visit Bromo Volcano

The Regency of Probolinggo in East Java is urging the public not to delay plans to visit the iconic Bromo Volcano, despite its current level of increased volcanic activity.

Quoted by Kompas.com, the head of the Culture and Tourism Department of the Regency of Probolinggo, Anung Widiarto, emphasized that while Mount Bromo is showing levels of fluctuating volcanic activity it is still safe for tourism visits.

Anung Widiarto said: “It’s alright to visit Bromo. What’s important is to stay 2.5 kilometers away from the crater and not visit the sea of volcanic ash surrounding the volcano. Bromo remains a beautiful place to visit and remains safe for tourist visitors.”

Anung Widiarto said reports in the media have made tourists frightened to visit Bromo. He said that the view of Bromo, enjoyed at a safe distance, remains one of the most wonderful panoramas to be see anywhere in the world. Safe and inspiring vistas are available from Butkit Mentigen and Seruni Point.

Anung added: "From Mentigen and Seruni Point, the beauty of Mount Bromo can be enjoyed. Let’s visit Bromo as we approach Christmas and New Years."

Prior to the recent eruptions of Mt. Bromo an average of 255 domestic and 46 foreign tourists visited the volcano each day. In recent days, this total has declined to an average 83 domestic and 29 foreign tourists.

Hotels and restaurants surrounding the volcano have also experienced dramatic drops in visitors in recent weeks.


Brackish Backlash
Large Deficit of Water Usage Causing Hotels in Badung Regency to Resort to Desalination

Radar Bali warns that Bali’s water shortage is becoming more acute, particularly in the southernmost areas of the Island.

Officials of the Badung Regency estimate that annual water demand in the regency now totals 28 million cubic meters. This compares with estimates that the maximum limit of sustainable water use is put at 25 million cubic meters.

This deficit of water usage, according to Ni Putu Dessy Darmayanti of the Office of Public Works - Human Settlements and Spatial Planning (DCK), threatens environmental balance in South Bali, adding: “Frankly, this is most concerning. Until this time we have no firm solution.”

The bulk of water used in the Badung Regency is attributed to residential consumption, with 20,990 households counted in the regency. The second largest consumer of water is attributed to accommodation providers put at 847 units.

Because of the inability of the State Water Board (PDAM) to provide a consistent and dependable water supply, hotels are resorting to deep bore wells of 160 meters to access brackish water that must be pumped to the surface and then undergo an expensive filtration process to render it potable.

Dessy said hotels are also tapping into rainwater absorb into the Island’s ground water system.

Bali’s increasing dependence on desalination is not only an expensive solution to the Island’s water crisis, but also threatens the eco system of the surrounding seas.

“Indeed, the is no simple solution (to the water crisis). But the use of sea water may prove an temporary effective solution,” said Dessy.


Eat on the Streets and Be Happy!
Denpasar Festival and Denpasar Food Fest December 28- 31, 2015

More 90 vendors are expected to present food stands at the Denpasar Festival and Denpasar Food Fest to be held on Jalan Gajah Mada in Denpasar December 28-31, 2015.

Part of the “DenFest” celebration – the four-day event also includes stands selling textiles, handicrafts, cultural presentations and garden displays.

The festival with the theme “For Denpasar” will be centered at the Catur Muka Monument on Jalan Gajah Mada in the heart of Denpasar.

A spokesman for the Municipal Government of Denpasar told DenPost that it is hoped that the food vendors will maintain affordable pricing that is posted at the front of their individual stands.


Bali Feeling in the Dumps
Bali’s Main Garbage Dump Growing to Gargantuan Proportions as Government Refuses to Move Against Failed Management of TPA Suwung

Bali’s largest rubbish dump at Suwung, near Sanur, is an eyesore that is more than 15-meters high, radiates unsavory aromas over a wide area of South Bali, represents a threat to public health and seeps dangerous heavy metals and other toxins across the southern waters and beaches of Bali.

Plainly visible to motorists traveling Ball’s new toll road or the Ngurah Rai Bypass at the Benoa intersection, the Rubbish Dump (TPA Suwung) will earn first notice of the gargantuan pile of trash via its noxious smell.

A private company PT NOEI has held a government license to manage TPA Suwung for the past decade against the promise of processing the mountain of garbage and creating 12 megawatts of electrical power. By all accounts,however,  PT NOEI has failed on almost every level with the pile of garbage growing higher on a daily basis and its failure to generate any appreciable amount of electrical power.

Bali’s deputy-governor Ketut Sudikerta told Bali Post,” The Governor has personally requested that the contract for managing rubbish at Suwung be revoked due to the lack of technological follow up by PT NOEI.”

Sudikerta said the right to formally claim contractual non-performance against PT NOEI and terminate their contract rests with the Municipality of Denpasar. The Governor has asked that the right to manage TPA Suwung be surrendered to the Province. which that would clear the way for terminating PT NOEI’s contract. According to Sudikerta, that request from the Governor to the Denpasar Administration has remained unanswered.


A Winning Tradition
Bali Safari & Marine Park Snares Two Awards at Indonesia Travel and Tourism Awards 2015/2016

Product Update

Bali Safari & Marine Park has added two more prestigious awards to its trophy collection. At the Indonesian Travel and Tourism Awards 2015/2106 (ITTA) held at the Ritz-Carlton Jakarta on Monday, December 14, 2105, the popular animal park in Bali’s Gianyar Regency won honors as “Indonesia’s Leading Theme Park” and “Indonesia’s Leading Tourism Show” for its Bali Agung Show.

The gala awards evening was attended by tourism leaders from across the Nation who saw winners in 48 separate categories vie for honors in what has become the most prized recognition granted to Indonesian tourism operators. Bali Safari & Marine Park’s winning of two awards for 2015/2016 marks the fifth consecutive year for ITTA to so honor the Park and underlines Bali Safari’s unrelenting commitment to remain at the forefront of conservation, education and wholesome family entertainment.

Interviewed at the Jakarta awards ceremony, Mr. William Santoso, General Manager of the Bali Safari & Marine Park, said: “These awards are positive proof that over the eight years of its operation the Bali Safari & Marine Park has always prioritized its leadership position, product quality and excellent service provided by its professional staff. Essentially, these awards are the fruit of excellent cooperation and coordination among all the team members at the Bali Safari & Marine Park. Our team is tireless in the pursuit of innovation and product enhancement – always striving to improve and maintain its leading position in Indonesian tourism. While this is what our team members have achieved, on behalf of Bali Safari & Marine Park, I would also like to also thank those who organized the ITTA awards and the many people who voted for us in the two winning categories.”

The Indonesia Travel and Tourism Awards (ITTA) are given each year to leading Indonesian tour operators. Selection leading to receiving the much-coveted recognition takes place over a three-stage process. First, is an online voting process that saw 41,103 votes cast from 25 countries for the 2015/2016 awards. Second, a qualified board of advisors reviews and evaluates all nominees. And, finally, a survey of all nominees is conducted by the Bina Nusantara University (BINUS).

These awards serve the function of introducing, honoring and celebrating the excellence found in every sector of Indonesia’s vast travel industry. Via the award ceremony, tourism practitioners are reminded of the importance of providing the public with quality services. Tourism, as the second leading source of foreign exchange after Indonesia’s energy sector, is always expected to provide guaranteed levels of quality service to both the Indonesian and international traveler.


Twas’ the Night Before Christmas in Bali
Balidiscovery.com Reprints Bali-Based Author Richard E. Lewis Whimsical Spin of a Christmas Classic

First published in 1823, “The Night Before Christmas,” often cited as the best-known verse ever written by an American, has become a mainstay around the world, read every year on Christmas Eve. Its mirthful depiction of Santa Claus riding a sleigh pulled by eight reindeer has formed the iconic vision of St. Nick for generations of holidaymakers.
 


Attributed to Clement Clarke Moore (1799-1863), “The Night Before Christmas” has been reworked by well-known Bali-based author Richard E. Lewis who has given this favorite poem a genuine Balinese twist.

First run by Balidiscovery.com in December of 2014, by popular demand we share it again for the current season's celebrants of the Yuletide season.

TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS


(Adapted by Richard E. Lewis)



Twas the night before Christmas, and in our bungalow

The listrik was mati and all the candles aglow.

The flying ants were swarming and the kids were suspicious

For they believed that St Nick was somebody fictitious.

They were huddled together on one bamboo bed
Trying to stay awake but their eyes were like lead.
The Mrs. and I listened to the sudden barking of dogs
Joining the chorus of big-throated frogs.

Then there came from the garden such a loud clatter
I sprang from the tikar to see what was the matter.
A surprise visit from family traveling afar?
Or a merry tourist gotten lost from the bar?

The moon on the lake that had been the front lawn
Glowed with a light that was brighter than dawn.
And what to my wondering eyes should I see
But a miniature dokar rolling past the mango tree

The driver was chubby and wearing a sarong.
And the dokar was pulled by eight little barongs.
But was this St Nick? I admit I was doubtful

He looked an awful lot like the Australian Consul.

The little old man was lively and quick
And pulled from his mouth a worn toothpick
To yell at his charges tugging his ride
Prancing and dancing with high-footed pride.
 


"Now Meester, now Seester, now, Toris and Bulé
On, Mas! On Gus! On Sambal and Gulé!
To the top of the porch, to that hole in the roof!
Get along quick, chop chop and hoof hoof!"

And then overhead I heard such a hard landing
I was surprised the walls were still standing.
As I drew in my head, and was turning around,
Through the hole St Nicholas shot through with a bound.
 


His beard was matted and he was shiny with sweat
It's humidity that gets you, on that you can bet.
He unslung his sack with almighty crash.
Just like a picker who's been through the trash.
 


"I don't like the wet season," he said with sigh.

"But your children have been good, at least since July."
I didn't know about that, but I wasn't going to argue
In fact I was hoping he had a toy for me too.

He filled the kids' baskets with all kinds of goodies
And "I've been to the North Pole" souvenir hoodies
"I must be off," said he, "for there is still much to do.
Can you believe there are good children out there in Canggu?" 
 


Up he sprang…and got stuck in the hole
I pushed him through with a long bamboo pole
I heard him exclaim, 'ere he drove out of sight,
"Selamat Hari Natal to all, and to all a good night."


 
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February 7, 2011

Bali Update #751
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Bali Update #750
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Bali Update #749
January 17, 2011

Bali Update #748
January 10, 2011

Bali Update #747
January 3, 2011

Bali Update #746
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Bali Update #745
December 20, 2010

Bali Update #744
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Bali Update #743
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Bali Update #742
November 29, 2010

Bali Update #741
November 22, 2010

Bali Update #740
November 15, 2010

Bali Update #739
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Bali Update #738
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Bali Update #737
October 25, 2010

Bali Update #736
October 18, 2010

Bali Update #735
October 11, 2010

Bali Update #734
October 4, 2010

Bali Update #733
September 27, 2010

Bali Update #732
September 20, 2010

Bali Update #731
September 13, 2010

Bali Update #730
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Bali Update #729
August 30, 2010

Bali Update #728
August 23, 2010

Bali Update #727
August 16, 2010

Bali Update #726
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Bali Update #725
August 2, 2010

Bali Update #724
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Bali Update #723
July 19, 2010

Bali Update #722
July 12, 2010

Bali Update #721
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Bali Update #720
June 28, 2010

Bali Update #719
June 21, 2010

Bali Update #718
June 14, 2010

Bali Update #717
June 07, 2010

Bali Update #716
May 31, 2010

Bali Update #715
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Bali Update #714
May 17, 2010

Bali Update #713
May 10, 2010

Bali Update #712
May 3, 2010

Bali Update #711
April 26, 2010

Bali Update #710
April 19, 2010

Bali Update #709
April 12, 2010

Bali Update #708
April 05, 2010

Bali Update #707
March 29, 2010

Bali Update #706
March 22, 2010

Bali Update #705
March 15, 2010

Bali Update #704
March 08, 2010

Bali Update #703
March 01, 2010

Bali Update #702
February 22, 2010

Bali Update #701
February 15, 2010

Bali Update #700
February 8, 2010

Bali Update #699
February 1, 2010

Bali Update #698
January 25, 2010

Bali Update #697
January 18, 2010

Bali Update #696
January 11, 2010

Bali Update #695
January 4, 2010

Bali Update #694
December 28, 2009

Bali Update #693
December 21, 2009

Bali Update #692
December 14, 2009

Bali Update #691
December 7, 2009

Bali Update #690
November 30, 2009

Bali Update #689
November 23, 2009

Bali Update #688
November 16, 2009

Bali Update #687
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Bali Update #686
November 2, 2009

Bali Update #685
October 26, 2009

Bali Update #684
October 19, 2009

Bali Update #683
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Bali Update #682
October 05, 2009

Bali Update #681
September 28, 2009

Bali Update #680
September 21, 2009

Bali Update #679
September 14, 2009

Bali Update #678
September 07, 2009

Bali Update #677
August 31, 2009

Bali Update #676
August 24, 2009

Bali Update #675
August 17, 2009

Bali Update #674
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Bali Update #673
August 03, 2009

Bali Update #672
July 27, 2009

Bali Update #671
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Bali Update #670
July 13, 2009

Bali Update #669
July 06, 2009

Bali Update #668
June 29, 2009

Bali Update #667
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Bali Update #666
June 15, 2009

Bali Update #665
June 08, 2009

Bali Update #664
June 01, 2009

Bali Update #663
May 25, 2009

Bali Update #662
May 18, 2009

Bali Update #661
May 11, 2009

Bali Update #660
May 04, 2009

Bali Update #659
April 27, 2009

Bali Update #658
April 18, 2009

Bali Update #657
April 11, 2009

Bali Update #656
April 04, 2009

Bali Update #655
March 28, 2009

Bali Update #654
March 21, 2009

Bali Update #653
March 14, 2009

Bali Update #652
March 07, 2009

Bali Update #651
February 28, 2009

Bali Update #650
February 21, 2009

Bali Update #649
February 14, 2009

Bali Update #648
February 7, 2009

Bali Update #647
January 31, 2009

Bali Update #646
January 26, 2009

Bali Update #645
January 19, 2009

Bali Update #644
January 10, 2009

Bali Update #643
January 05, 2009

Bali Update #642
December 29, 2008

Bali Update #641
December 22, 2008

Bali Update #640
December 15, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #638
December 01, 2008

Bali Update #637
November 24, 2008

Bali Update #636
November 17, 2008

Bali Update #635
November 10, 2008

Bali Update #634
November 03, 2008

Bali Update #633
October 27, 2008

Bali Update #632
October 20, 2008

Bali Update #631
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Bali Update #630
October 06, 2008

Bali Update #629
Septembe 29, 2008

Bali Update #628
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Bali Update #627
September 15, 2008

Bali Update #626
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Bali Update #625
September 01, 2008

Bali Update #624
August 25, 2008

Bali Update #623
August 18, 2008

Bali Update #622
August 11, 2008

Bali Update #621
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Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
July 21, 2008

Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
July 07, 2008

Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
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Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
June 02, 2008

Bali Update #611
May 26, 2008

Bali Update #610
May 19, 2008

Bali Update #609
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Bali Update #608
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Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
April 07, 2008

Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
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Bali Update #601
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #600
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
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Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
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Bali Update #587
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Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
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Bali Update #581
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Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
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Bali Update #578
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Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
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Bali Update #573
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Bali Update #572
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Bali Update #571
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Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
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Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
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Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
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Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
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Bali Update #557
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Bali Update #556
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Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
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Bali Update #551
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Bali Update #550
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Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
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Bali Update #541
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Bali Update #540
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Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
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Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
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Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
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Bali Update #530
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Bali Update #529
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Bali Update #528
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Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
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Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
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Bali Update #523
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Bali Update #522
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Bali Update #521
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Bali Update #520
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Bali Update #519
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Bali Update #518
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Bali Update #517
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Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
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Bali Update #512
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Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
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Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
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Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
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Bali Update #503
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Bali Update #502
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Bali Update #501
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