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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #1036 - 11 July 2016

IN THIS UPDATE


Nothing to Fear
After Lone-Wolf Terror Attack in Central Java, Tourism Minister Assures Indonesia Remains a Safe Holiday Destination

Following a failed suicide bomber attack on a police station in Surakarta, Central Java, on Tuesday, July 5, 2016, Indonesia's Minister of Tourism, Arief Yahya, has issued a statement declaring that the entire Indonesian archipelago remains safe and conducive for Tourism.

As reported by Beritabali.com, Yahya said: "In the aftermath (of the Surakarta incident), there are no indications of terrorism in tourism areas. Domestic and international tourists, therefore, have no need to worry. There's no need to delay plans to holiday at Indonesian tourism attractions."

The Tourism Minister also condemned several anonymous letters making the circuit intended to irresponsibly raise fears among the public. Adding: "Our police are clever. That's been proven. Don't worry. Everything will be all right. Out enforcements agencies are in motion."

A suicide bomber riding a motorcycle tried to enter the Surakarta (Solo) police precinct early on the morning of July 5, 2016. Stopped by an alert policeman guarding the station, the bomber only managed to kill himself by detonating his bomb in a driveway.

After that incident that took place in the middle of the busiest travel period of Lebaran, Indonesian Transport Minister Ignasius Jonan instructed the various components of the national transport system to be on guard. With immediate effect, security were stepped up at all air, sea and rail ports across Indonesia.

Jonan said: "In accordance with guidance given by the President, security measures for activities during the Lebaran period for air, sea and land transport - including the national rail system - have been tightened up."

The Minister called on the public to assist officials in security measures by reporting any suspicious activities or unattended luggage as they travel across Indonesia to visit family and friends. Jonan asked for the public's understanding for any delays they encounter traveling over the holiday period resulting from heightened security measures.


A Dozen Million Will Do
Tough Slog Ahead as Indonesia Targets 12 Million Foreign Visitors in 2016

Indonesia remains steadfast, determined to achieve a total of 12 million foreign tourist visitors for all of 2016. In 2015, the Republic of Indonesia fell short of its stated goal of 10 million tourists.

As reported by The Jakarta Globe, the government estimates that 12 million foreign tourists visiting Indonesia in a single year will yield US$12 billion in much-needed foreign exchange for the nation.

With national foreign tourist totals through the end of May 2016 reaching only 4.43 million, the Tourism Ministry is admitting that more tourism promotion may be needed to successfully end the year with 12 million visitors.

Statistically, the liberalization of visa-on-arrival policies is bearing fruit in the form increased visitor totals to Indonesia. Meanwhile the government is working frantically to promote new tourism destinations, designating the following 10 areas for special infrastructure and promotional attention: Borobudur Temple in Magelang, Mandalika in Lombok, Labuhan Bajo near the Komodo National Park, Bromo Volcano in East Java, the Thousand Islands outside Jakarta, Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Wakatobi at Southeast Sulawesi, Tanjung Lesung Resort in Banten, Morotai in Maluku, and Tanjung Kelayan in Belitung.

On a nation-wide basis, according to The Jakarta Globe, the top sources of foreign n tourists to Indonesia are shown below with visitors totals January-May 2016:
  • Singapore - 692,680
  • China - 615,288
  • Malaysia - 563,042
  • Australia - 471,967
  • Japan - 136,666
  • India - 36,882 (sic)
  • South Korea - 33,845 (sic)
By contrast, the top 7 sources of foreign tourists to Bali during the same period of January - May 2016:
  • Australia - 492,017
  • China - 385,360
  • Japan - 91,174
  • United Kingdom - 80,428
  • Malaysia - 75,663
  • India - 73,939
  • U.S.A. - 68,549

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Rude Russian
Russian Man Runs Amuck Near Uluwatu

A 25-year-old Russian man, Ilya Malyshev, was taken into custody by police on Jalan Uluwatu, South Kuta, for disorderly behavior on Friday, July 8, 2016.

As reported by Metrobali.com, the Russian became involved in an altercation with local residents during which, at one point, he reportedly tried to choke a local man.

Police were called when Malyshev lost control and began hitting a local resident who tried to prevent the Russian, said to have been naked at the time, from driving onto the main road at 8:00 am. Police were told how the foreign visitor struck and tried to choke the local Balinese.

rs who tried to separate the Russian from his victim were rewarded with additional blows from Malyshev.

Community watch officials (Babinkamtubmas) arrived quickly at the scene preventing Malyshev from falling victim to retaliatory mob anger from a growing group of local residents.

According to The Bali Post, the Moscow resident was brought by police to the South Kuta police precinct for an interview before being turned over to immigration authorities for deportation processing.

When police were asked to comment on the case, they told the press "it was only a simple misunderstanding." Police also confirmed the man was under the influence of alcohol at the time of the confrontation.


A Joke that Bombed Badly
Two North Bali Children Caught by Police Trying to Coerce Money by Threatening Neighbor with a Bomb

Two young children from the village of Kalibukbuk in North Bali have had to deal with the police after writing a bomb threat and posting it on the fence post of a neighbor.

As reported by Metrobali.com, the two errant children, identified as only KA (10) and US (10), anonymously threatened their neighbor Hinardi (41) on Wednesday, July 6, 2016, prompting the neighbor to report the letter to the Singaraja Police Precinct.

The childlike quality of the written threat and further enquiries led police to the doorstep of the two children who quickly admitted their crime before the police and their parents.

The children's note had demanded money or threatened they would bomb the house within 3 hours.

The children's parents have signed pledges to the police to provide better level of adult supervision, promising also the children will not be allowed to associate with any radical movements.


Business is Leaping
Dolphin Watching Trips in Bali's North Surge During Lebaran Holidays

Fishermen working Bali's northern shore at Lovina have seen their income increase by as much as 100% during the Lebaran Holiday 2016.

Metrobali.com reports the holidays brought on onrush of bookings from domestic tourists eager to see the pods of free-swimming dolphins that visit the area each morning.

The head of the local tourism fishing group at Lovina, Putu Budista, said on Friday, July 8, 2016, that fishermen were taking groups of 10 people out to see the dolphins when, in normal times they would only serve one to four passengers.

Each passenger wishing to see the offshore dolphins pays a tariff of around Rp. 100,000.

The peak season to see the dolphins living off Bali's north shore is between June and August, with Chinese and European tourists predominating among passenger.

During the Idul Fitri holidays, the mass movement of domestic holidaymaker brings a windfall of local travelers keen to see the swimming dolphins and snorkel above the coral reefs near Lovina.


Rising Seas, Shrinking Island
Soka Beach in Tabanan, West Bali Under Threat from Erosion

The beach abrasion along Soka Beach in Tabanan, West Bali continues to make itself felt with an estimated 700 square meters of land owned by villages in Atap disappearing into the sea since 2012.

One Atap villager, Ni Nyoman Suiki (58), told Beritabali.com on Monday, July 4, 2016, that the erosion has carried away 7 ares of village land and a coconut tree. Adding, “Each year, little by little, the land is being swept away into the sea.”

A life-long resident of Atap, Suiki said that in the past erosion of village land by waves was not a problem. In 1989, the shoreline was still some 20-meters from the fish weighing station that is located in front of her small shop. But rising sea levels over the years have now halved the distance of the station from the ocean waves to only 10 meters.

Suiki explained, “If there are big waves on the shoreline, the fish weighing station and performance pavilion are surrounded by seawater.”

The chief of the Fisheries and Shores Service, I Made Subagia, has surveyed Soka Beach and reported his findings to his agency. Subagia warned that the problem of shoreline abrasion was not the sole responsibility of his agency, with any solution requiring assistance from other government bodies as well.


Tanah Lot a ‘Must See’ for Lebaran Tourists
Bali’s Tanah Lot Temple Complex Welcomes Record Number of Visitors During Idul Fitri Holiday Week

Dominated by domestic tourists, a record total of 13,799 tourists visited Bali’s iconic Tanah Lot Temple on Wednesday, July 6, 2016. On the first day of the 2-day Islamic celebration of the Idul Fitri, 9,439 domestic tourists (68%) and 4,540 foreign tourists (32%) visited the complex.

During the week-long holiday period, domestic tourists flocked to the Tanah Lot Temple coming from other major population centers in Indonesia, such as Jakarta, Surabaya, Bogor, Malang, Sidoarjo, Bandung, Jogjakarta and Makassar.

As reported by BeritaBali.com, the managers of the Tanah Lot Complex have anticipated the holiday rush by enhancing gate services, adding parking space, installing additional CCTV surveillance and suplementing security personnel.


The Many Wonders of East Java
A Short Distance from Bali, East Java Offers a Large Number of Interesting Attractions for Tourist Visitors

Designated by the Indonesian government as an up-and-coming tourism destination, the many attractions of Banyuwangi being after a 30-minute ferry ride from Bali’s western port of Gilimanuk and landing at Ketapang, the port of Banyuwangi.

The remarkably clean and well-organized city and the surrounding regency now annually attract 1.5 million domestic tourists and 30,000 foreign tourists.

Recently, Indonesia’s Minister of Tourism, Arief Yahya, took time to extol the many tourism attractions in Banyuwangi. Yahya, a native of the area, said, “there are many interesting locations.” Yahya went on to enumerate just some of the many local attractions, including mountains, the “blue fire” of the flaming caldera atop Mount Ijen, excellent beaches, surfing and diving. Adding: "If you are impressed seeing interesting natural phenomenon: Come to Banyuwangi!”
  1. Kawah Ijen – The Ijen active caldera stands 2,368 meters above sea level, measure 20-kilomters across and is surrounded by a caldera wall measuring 300-500 meters in height. Located administratively in the regencies of Bondowoso and Banyuwangi, the Kawah Ijen is internationally famous for its “Api Biru” or “Blue Fire” – a blue fire located within the crater that presents a spectacular light show after dark.

    No less interesting is the large sulfur mining operation that is underway every day at Kawah Ijen. One of only two traditional sulfur mining operations in Indonesia, Kawah Ijen together with Welirang at Mojokerto, also in East Java, where valuable sulfur is mined by hand and men walk deep into an active crater to carry loads weighing between 80-100 kilograms out of the crater to mobile transport centers.
    Depending on which route your take the trip from Banyuwangi to Kawah Ijen can take between 2 – 4 hours.

  2. Plengkung Beach – G-Land
    Plengkung Beach is an East Java surfing destination, more popularly known by both local and international surfers as “G-Land.” Many who have surfed this area label G-Land, cite this area as home to one of the “Seven Giant Wave Wonders” – a name earned by the “7” shape of incoming waves that can reach 6 meters in height. Other surfers compare the waves on this beach to be on a par with those found in Hawaii.

    The best surfing at G-Land occurs during the months of July-September, but anytime is the right time for a relaxing beach holiday.

  3. Rajegwesi Beach
    Located at the village of Sarongan in the sub-district of Pesanggaran, offers visitors natural vistas together with sites of historical interest. Located on this beach are the remnants of old Japanese war bunkers used in WW II.
    The sand along Rajagwesi Beach is chocolate in color and soft in texture, the result of indigenous sand mixing with mud washing down from a river during seasonal flooding.
    Also of interest are the daily activities of local fishermen who use Rajegwesi Beach as their homeport and a nearby beach preserved as a turtle nesting area.

  4. Watu Dodol Beach
    Easily found when traveling from Jember to the Port of Ketapang is Watu Dodol Beach. To locate the Beach, look for a large boulder and the statue of a Banyuwangi dancer. The beach is only some 2-kilomters from the Port of Ketapang. A nearby hill can be climbed to enjoy a panoramic view of the busy port’s operation. On the beach, sample the local and r affordable cuisine served by local food vendors.

  5. Teluk Hijau – Green Bay.

    Green Bay offers sparkling clear water encircled by pristine white sand beaches against the backdrop of a tropical jungle. Located within the confines of the Meru Betiri National Park, Green Bay is a favorite for those seeking to swim, snorkel, build sand castles and fish.
    Nearby to Green Bay is the Bidadari Waterfall – an 8-meter high waterfall.

  6. Pantai Pulau Merah – Red Island Beach.
    Another beach named for a color, Red Island Beach is named after a nearby mountain known for the red color of its soil.
    Located in the sub-district of Pesanggarn, Red Island Beach is the home of Pura Tawang Alun – a Hindu Temple used for religious ceremonies on specific dates. Simple accommodation providers abound in this area for those wishing to spend more than a single day to swim, windsurf or conduct a photo safari.

  7. Air Terjun Kalibendo – Kalibendo Waterfall

    Located 20-kilometers from the center of Banyuwangi, the Kalibendo Waterfall boasts clean, cool water at a 10-meter high waterfall located in a higher, more refreshing altitude.
    The road to Kaliendo passes through scenic tea, coffee and clove plantations.

  8. Air Terjun Lider – Lider Waterfall

    This waterfall is located in the village of Sumber Arum in the sub-district of Songgong. Situated 1,300-meters above sea level, the area offers some challenges in terms of access and demands a degree of fitness for the hike to the waterfall.
    The hike, however, has its own rewards with views of agricultural plantations and a number of Jungle Rivers. Monkey encounters and bird watching opportunities are other bonuses to trekkers walking to the Lider Waterfall.

  9. Agrowisata Kali Klatak – Kali Klatak Agro-tourism Site
    Kali Klatak was once a plantation owned by the Dutch under Moorman & Company before being transferred to Indonesian ownership under R. Soehoed Prawiroatmodjo. Located on a mountain slope, Kali Klatak sits 450-meters above sea level and is home to rich soil that grows rubber, coffee, chocolate, coconuts, fruit and a range of spices.

  10. Cagar Alam Baluran – Baluran Nature Reserve

    Home to a large savannah, Baluran Nature Reserve provides a range for a large number of wild animals. Trekking through the Reserve or sitting in one of its observation towers can provide glimpses of wild banteng, oxen, deer, kijang, boar, wild cats and 196 species of birdlife.
To arrange an exploration of East Java from Bali, contact Bali Discovery Tours


Identity Left
Those arriving at a Bali Seaport without a Valid ID Could be Refused Entry to the Island

Indonesians visiting Bali for a short or more extended period are reminded that they should be prepared to show a valid National Identity Card (KTP) or risk being turned away and sent back to their point of origin.

Quoting Surabaya resident, Iskandar, who told Kompas.com: “There was an inspection. But that didn’t matter. I came to Bali with my KTP ready. Once I came (to Bali) and my KTP had expired and was ordered to return to Java. I’ve learned my lesson.”

A check for a valid KTP applies for all Indonesians landing in Bali by foot at a ferry landing, entering in a private vehicle or on board a bus.

Passengers arriving by foot pass through metal detectors and then stop at a KTP inspection desk. Those arriving in a private vehicle or a bus will be asked for their identity papers following a vehicle inspection conducted by the police.

Foreign nationals arriving via one of Bali’s seaports should be prepared to show their passport, if requested.

For reasons that are unclear, travelers arriving on domestic flights at Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport are not asked to show their identity papers upon arrival.


Bali as a Bargain
Bali Proves to be a Price-Friendly and Increasingly Destination for Indonesian Holidaymakers

The State News Agency Antara recently highlighted how Bali can be highly affordable destination for visitors, both foreign and domestic.

Visiting North Bali during the 2016 Lebaran Holiday, Winda Salwati (48) was pleasantly surprised when she received her bill at a BBQ fish restaurant located in Lovina, Buleleng. The mother of two from Cikarang, West Java, received a bill for a meal with her family that was much lower than anticipated. A lunch for eight people that included several kinds of fish, prawns, chicken, vegetables, fish soup and fresh coconut juice came to only Rp. 234,000 or Rp. 29,250 per person. Winda told Antara that such prices were much lower than she could find in Jakarta.

Originally from Payakumbuh, West Sumatra, Winda bitterly recalled her disappointment during a homecoming in West Sumatra on Lebaran 2105 when she was presented with a hefty bill for Rp. 500,000 for three simple “nasi kapau” lunch parcels.

Winda was reportedly very pleased to find affordable and tasty meals during the remaining days of the family’s Bali holiday.

Riri Ridwan of Garut, West Java, who traveled to Bali with her family for the Lebaran Holidays, encountered a similar experience. According to Riri (39), she was filled with trepidation when she invited her family to dine on Bali’s popular seafood center of Jimbaran Beach, a fear made worse by the large number of foreign tourists dining there that left her thinking the prices would be high.

A helpful waiter shared ordering tips on "food packets" that ensure plenty of food at affordable prices resulting in a price of only Rp. 175,000 for a dinner packet that can be shared by two diners.

Both Winda and Riri told Antara that they came to Bali with the mistaken assumption that an expensive holiday awaited them.

Among the destinations and attractions most visited by domestic visitors to Bali are Kuta Beach, Tanah Lot, Sanur Beach, Uluwatu Temple in Jimbaran, Tanjung Benoa and Lake Beratan.

With some estimates placing the average mix of Indonesian visitors to Bali at 65% that number surges during the Lebaran period that represents the peak period for Indonesian travel.

A growing domestic market to Bali has made service providers on the Islander more receptive in pricing, products offerings and levels of service required to attract and retain Indonesian travelers.

During the 2016 Lebaran Holiday parking lots, including emergency parking area, were filled with vehicles bearing license plates from places outside Bali. Accommodation ranging from those costing less than Rp. 200,000 a night up until jetset properties costing more than US$1,000 per night attract both local and foreign travelers.


A Brain is a Terrible thing to Waste
Governor Calls for Sharper Thinking Among the Balinese at Tumpek Landep Celebrations

On Saturday, July 9, 2016, Bali celebrated Tumpek Landep – one of five separate Tumpek days that include Landep, Uduh, Uve (Kandang), Kuningan and Wayang.

Each Tumpek day is celebrated once every 210 days on the Balinese calendar set aside for paying respect to different fundamental components of the physical world. Landep is a day for honoring the tools of our trades, including any kind of transportation; Uduh respects living plants and the crops that sustain us; Uve or Kandang is a day set aside for paying homage to the members of the animal kingdom, including a family's livestock and pets; Wayang offers deference to the many puppets used in portraying ancient tales; and Kuningan is an all-purpose Tumpek day to give thanks for all the components of the physical universe – especially those items possibly overlooked on the other Tumpek days.

Tumpek Landep is used to figuratively sharpen the weapons of our daily lives. Tools, cars, motorcycles, bicycles, computers, kitchen equipment and other tools of trade undergo cleansings, blessings and prayers on this day.

Bali’s Governor Made Mangku Pastika, quoted by Metrobali.com, said on the most recent celebration of Tumpek Landep should be used as a point of departure to emulate clearer and sharper thinking in the process of personal decision making.

The Governor shared his comments in an interview following participation in Tumpek Landep prayers at Pura Penataran Agung Kerta Sabha, near his official residence in Denpasar. Adding,“Let us celebrate Tumpek Landep as an expression of our thanks and sharpen out thinking so we make the correct decisions in facing the many problems we face.”

The formal ceremony included a short religious procession, formal prayers and the presentation of a number of Balinese traditional dances before joining a group meal.


Time Off for Good Behavior
225 Moslem Prisoners at Bali’s Kerobokan Prison Receive Sentence Reductions

Seven Moslem convicts housed at the Kerobokan Prison in Bali were formally granted their freedom via a “special remission” on the occasion of Hari Raya Idul Fitri 1437 H.

As reported by the State News Agency Antara, the chief of Prisons for the Justice and Human Rights Ministry in Bali, Nyoman Putra Surya, confirmed that 225 Islamic prisoners in Bali received sentence reductions, with 7 allowed to walk free as part of traditional Lebaran rewards to Indonesia’s prison population.

Sentence reductions ranged in length from 15 days to 2 months.

The Kerobokan Prison continues to suffer from severe overcrowding with 1,082 prisons living in a facility designed to house only 323 people.


Voices from Coastal Communities
‘Voices from Coastal Communities’ – Photo Exhibition on East Bali Marine Conservation July 24 – August 6, 2016, at Casa Luna, Ubud

Casa Luna and the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (UWRF) will host “Voices from Coastal Communities” - a Lensa Masyarakat Nusantara (LMN) photography exhibition, showcasing 70 extraordinary images from their first project with the East Bali Marine Conservation Program.

Based on Photovoices International, the exhibition presents a powerful visual essay from the coastal areas of Amed and Tulamben, in East Bali.

Fishermen, farmers, housewives, dive guides and young people have taken the photographs. Camera and photography training were provided by Lensa Masyarakat Nusantara (LMN) with the aim to record important issues in the communities, such as the environment, traditions, culture, and the strengths and challenges of the community.

The East Bali Marine Conservation Program is a project of Lensa Masyarakat Nusantara along with the Coral Reef Alliance and Yayasan Reef Check Indonesia. Their combined focus is to increase communities’ sensitivity to their surroundings and consequent problem mapping through a visual learning process.

asa Luna is intimately connected with the international Ubud Writers & Readers Festival. Both organizations believe in the power of storytelling and promoting the unique voice of the Indonesian the people” said Janet DeNeefe, owner of Casa Luna, and Founder & Director of the Ubud Writers & Readers Festival. “Our commitment is to provide an ongoing platform for Balinese communities, and human rights issues, to assist in the betterment of lives.”

The goal of the exhibition is to create important dialogue locally, as well as in the broader community, and to raise funds from photo sales for future projects.

The exhibition will open at 4:00 pm on July 24 and run until August 6, 2016, at Casa Luna.

The exhibition is supported by Casa Luna Ubud, Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, The Body Shop Indonesia, Australian Consulate General Bali, Yayasan Reef Check Indonesia, Coral Reef Alliance, MPIG Sea Salt Amed, Amed Coastal Society and the Yayasan Mudra Swari Saraswati.

The photographs will be on sale and all proceeds go to funding community projects.


Caught on Camera
Major Change of Personnel at Gilimanuk, Bali KTP Inspection Post Following Video of Corruption on Social Media

Following the wide distribution on social media of a video showing an official at a Gilimanuk, West Bali checkpoint turning a blind-eye to an invalid National Identity Card (KTP) in late June, eight enforcement officers (Pol PP) from the KTP Inspection Post at the Port of Gilimanuk were rotated out of their positions and relocated to new locations.

According to DenPost, a number of officers from other agencies suspected of involvement in graft were reassigned in the reshuffle.

The Jembrana Chief for Population and Civil Registry (Kadis Dufduk), Ketut Wiaspada, said on Sunday, July 3, 2016, said his office had left the final disposition of the scandal with the Inspectorate. Adding: “As a result of the Inspectorate’s investigation, a decision was taken (to reassign staff) by the Regent of Jembrana to be executed by the Civil Servants Bureau (BKD). We have just accepted that decision.”

An employee, identified by the initials ES, who was caught on film taking the bribe has reportedly been fired.

Wiaspada insists the job rotation has less to do with the recent scandal and more to do with refreshing job performance in a key area of the Island’s security.

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Bank-rolling on the River
Bali’s Telaga Waja Rafting Operators Facing Bankruptcy

DenPost reports that a number of rafting companies operating on the Telaga Waja River in Karangasem Regency are threatened with insolvency due to a downturn in customers and the resulting price war among those companies working the River.

A visiting team of officials led by the Regent of Karangasem, IGA MasSumatri, heard bitter complaints from a group of rafting operators on Friday, July 8, 2016. The owner of Telaga Dewata Rafting, I Wayan Sami, told the officials: “Now is a battle to win over the visiting tourists. In the end, a destructive tariff war has broken out.”

Sami, who also serves as chairman of the Association of Telaga Waja Rafting Companies, said there are 11 rafting companies operating on the river. Because of the downturn in tourists taking a trip, the tariff has gone down to only Rp. 175,000 to Rp. 200,000 per person. Sami explained that members of his association are now encountering difficulties meeting their payrolls and are in danger of going bankrupt.

Sumantri expressed his understanding and sympathy for the plight of the rafting operators in his regency and said he hoped business would soon improve.

The Telaga Waja River is famous for offering a somewhat more challenging rafting trip than that found on the Ayung River in Gianyar. Those who join a thrilling rafting trip on the Telaga Waja enjoy a 14-kilometer trip that takes 2.5 hours through scenic Bali countryside.


English Footballer Falls in Bali
Manchester United Star Chris Smalling Treated at Bali Hospital

Chris Smalling, a star defender from the Manchester United Football Club was rushed on Monday, July 4, 2016 to the Bros International Hospital in Denpasar, Bali from a luxury boutique resort in Ubud.

An initial report that Smalling was injured while surfing has been denied by those close to the soccer star, who now report that the footballer became faint after suffering severe food poisoning and subsequently collapsed and hit his head.

Pictures taken at the Hospital show Smalling with lacerations to the face and on intravenous medications.

Smalling traveled to Bali on a holiday after the English side made an early exit from the European Cup 2016 after being defeated by Iceland on June 27, 2016.

Doctors at the Bros International Hospital declined comment on their VIP patient except to say he received treatment in the emergency care unit of the hospital from a specialist in plastic surgery.

Smalling was released from the hospital a short time later and returned to his accommodations in Ubud.

He is scheduled to return to active practice at Manchester United in late July 2016.


Asking Susi to Just Say ‘No’
ForBALI Protestors Call on Minister Pudjiastuti to Refuse Request to Extend Location Permit for Benoa Bay Reclamation

Once again, tens of thousands of Balinese from a wide range of traditional villages took to the streets of Bali on Sunday, July 10, 2016 , in continuing protests against plans to reclaim Benoa Bay.

As reported by Balipost.com, the demonstrators filled the Ngurah Rai Bypass Highway, bringing traffic to a standstill.

The demonstrators have timed the latest protest to coincide with a deadline falling in the coming week for the Indonesian Minister of the Seas, Susi Pudjiastuti, to answer a request from the project developer – PT TWBI (PT Tirta Wahana Bali Internasional) for an extension on their environmental impact permit (Izin Amdal) needed for the reclamation to continue.

Led by ForBALI, the protestors briefly occupied the Gili Gita Intersection at Nusa Dua. The group initially gathered at the Lagoon Field in Bualu before marching to the intersection.

A declaration rejecting the reclamation was read and then the protestor marched on to the entrance to the Bali Mandara Toll Road where they unfurled a giant protest banner over Benoa Bay.

The Coordinator of ForBALI, Wayan “Gendo” Suardana, spoke to the crowd and urge all to lend their support to the Minister of Seas and Fisheries, Susi Pudjiastuti, hoping she would have the courage to refuse an extension to the location permit for PT TWBI.

PT TWBI has requested an extension of its location permit from Pudjiastuti that must be responded to before July 14, 2016.

Gendo warned that if Minister Pudjiatuti fails to answer the request for a permit extension that inaction can be legally interpreted to mean the permit has automatically extended.

The Protestors are calling on Pudjiastuti to formally deny the request for an extension to the location permit, a move that would arguably bring the reclamation project to an end.

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The Strong Arm of the Law
KontraS HAM: Police Brutality on the Increase in Indonesia

NusaBali report that the National Commission for Missing Persons and Violence (KontraS) is recording a sharp increase in torture reports in Indonesia, increasing from 90 cases to 134.

A staff member of the civil rights division of KontraS, SatrioWirataru, said the Commission’s investigations indicate that the police commit most cases of torture.

“Those practicing torture are dominated by the Indonesian Police. From 134 cases, 91 cases of torture and inhumane treatment were committed by the police,” said Satrio speaking in a public forum on Saturday, June 25, 2016.

KontraS gathered these results via media reports covering the period May 2015 until May 2016. The 134 cases reported involved 260 victims, the majority aged between 15-25 years.

The next most prominent groups involved in torture were members of the Indonesian Armed Forces with 24 cases followed by prison guards with 19 cases.

Satrio said most cases tracked by KontraS occur in heavily populated regions of the Country, such as North Sumatra, West Java and Central Java.

“Cases involving the police mostly occur at the polsek and polres level,” Satrio explained.

KontraS said that 66 of the cases of torture take place in police cells during the interrogation process. The remaining cases occurred in public places, offices, and the victim’s home.

Satrio continued, saying, “This shows that law enforcement’s image for violence and brutality remains high in the investigative process.”

Satrio told the press that one glaring case is that of Siyono, a man from Klaten, arrested as a suspected terrorist. Siyono died in police custody after being beaten while being transported by members of Indonesia’s elite anti-terror Densus 88 squad. Moreover, according to the KontraS official, police undertook steps to pressure the dead man’s family not to pursue an investigation into his death that occured while in police custody.

“There was an effort to silence the victim’s family with cash payments so the case not be brought forward. There was also a program of character assassination (by the police) against Siyono, depicting him as a “general” operating a terrorist group," said Satrio.


A Shift in National Tourism Sales Strategies
Tourism Ministry to Focus on ‘Hard Selling’ to Achieve Target of 12 Million Foreign Tourists by End of 2016

The Bali Post reports that the Indonesian Ministry of Tourism has announced that moving forward they will employ a program of “hard selling” involving digital marketing in cooperation with airlines, travel wholesalers, travel agents and tour operators.

Speaking at a fast-breaking gathering in Jakarta on Tuesday, June 28, 2016, I Gde Pitana, the Tourism Ministry’s Deputy for Market Development, said, “The hard selling program will represent a breakthrough to increase foreign tourist arrivals in order to achieve the targeted 12 million tourist arrivals for this year.”

Pitana said that hard selling would now receive more attention than current branding programs for “Wonderful Indonesia” and advertising programs. “We will undertake more selling, as compared to branding and advertising, apportioned at 50% selling, 30% branding and 20% for advertising,” said Pitana.

Pitana said that hard selling is bearing positive results with 3,518,726 foreign tourist arrivals nation-wide during the period January-April 2016. This total exceeded arrivals for the same period in 2015 by 7.54% and surpasses the government target of 3.3 million.

Bali’s three main gateways for foreign tourism remain - Bali, Jakarta and Batam. On a countrywide basis, the three largest markets for foreign tourists are Mainland China, Singapore and Australia.

Strongest growth in tourist arrivals for the period January-April 2016 was seen in the following markets: PRC (+2147%), Singapore (+3.46%), Indian (+31.44%), Saudi Arabia (+14.26%) and Egypt (+50.73%).

The Ministry revealed that part of its hard selling initiative would include facilitation of private sector participation at Table Top Travel Shows and overseas sales missions.


PayPal Just Got More Affordable
Hotel Links Solutions and Pay Pal Team-Up to Offer Lower Transaction Rates for Indonesian Hotel and Villa Operators

Hotel Link Solutions Indonesia – the digital online marketing solution for a growing number of Indonesian hotels and villas can now offer a very special deal for accommodation providers using PayPal.

Under the terms of a special agreement with PayPal, Hotel Link Solutions client hotels can now list PayPal among their payment portals and pay only 2.8% commission on the sale. This represents substantial savings over the 4.4% or more normally charged hotels on PayPal Sales.

Hotel Link Solutions Indonesia provides state-of-the-art websites offering highly functional websites, sophisticated booking engines and channel management for all major online travel agents (OTAs). Working on a flat fee basis (no commission) with no set-up charge for websites, total packages start from as little as US$80 a month.

Commenting on the special commission rate now available from PayPal on Hotel Link Solution Indonesia client hotels and villas, general manager of Hotel Link Solutions Indonesia, Chandra Himawan, said: “The lower and more competitive transaction charge from PayPal is certain to be an instant success with many of our hotels and villa clients. In addition to the range of payment portals options already in place, hotels who have found the high transaction fee form PayPal burdensome in the past will welcome the new, less expensive PayPal option. The ability to offer this cost saving on to our clients is in keeping with our role as digital marketing consultants to the hospitality industry. Hotel Link Solutions-Indonesia clients pay only a modest flat fee for our website-based services each month. Our simple mission remains to help our hotels and villas partners maximize their online booking, both direct from clients and via our extensive network of OTAs  using Hotel Link managed websites operated in accordance with current best industry practice."

Email to learn more about Hotel Link Solutions Indonesia

Hotel Link Solutions Website


 
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Bali Update #584
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Bali Update #583
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Bali Update #582
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Bali Update #581
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Bali Update #580
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Bali Update #579
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Bali Update #578
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Bali Update #577
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Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
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Bali Update #574
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Bali Update #573
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Bali Update #572
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Bali Update #571
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Bali Update #570
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Bali Update #569
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Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
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Bali Update #557
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Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
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Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
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Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
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Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
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