Bali Discovery Tours: Homepage
Bali Hotels, Bali Villas and Bali News from balidiscovery.com
Home Bali Contact Bali Practicalities Bali News Bali Services Bali Transportation Bali Sports Bali Excursions Bali Villas Bali Hotels
Home · News · Bali Update · Archive
Bali Hotels, Bali Villas and Bali News from balidiscovery.com
Bali Hotels
Bali Villas
Bali Excursions
Bali Sports
Bali Transportation
Bali Services
Bali News
Bali Practicalities
Bali Contact
Home
 
Bali Update
Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter!
 
Feedback
"Your web site is an amazing calling card for the style and class of your business."

Bruce Austin, Backroads
Send us your [Feedback]!
 
Bali Reasons
Reliability and Credibility
We are members in good standing of The Association of Indonesian Travel Agents (ASITA), Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA), Bali Village, and the International Conference Association (ICCA)
More good [Reasons]?
 
Bali Contact
Bali Discovery Tours
Komplek Pertokoan
Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
Sanur, Bali, Indonesia

Tel: ++62 361 286 283
Fax: ++62 361 286 284
24h: ++62 812 3819724



PATAASITAICCA
VisaMasterCardAmerican Express
 
 
Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #451 - 02 May 2005

Crackdown on Villa Builders Continues
Local Press Reports Several Villa Projects Halted by Sub-District and Regency Officials.

The crackdown on villas that violate local zoning codes continues in Bali with the Indonesian-language Denpost reporting that South Kuta authorities have halted construction of the 12-unit Halcyon Villa complex on Jalan Wanagiri in Jimbaran.

According to the Denpost article, the project, listed as "Hollycon Villa" (sic) in the Denpost report, was subsequently confirmed to be Halycon Villas following a call to the Contractor listed on the Halycon Web Site . The individual answering the telephone at the Construction company confirmed both the correct spelling of the villa project and that they had recently been cited by local sub-district officials for building while permits were still under process.

According to the Denpost report, the project, which is already in an advanced stage of construction, lacks a number of required official permits that must be in hand before commencing construction. The article also quoted the Head of the South Kuta Sub-District Chief, Drs. I Putu Eka Merthawan, as saying that the project located on the road leading to the Ritz Carlton Bali Resort is located in a "Class I" Conservancy Area in which development is restricted.

According to the Denpost story, local officials claim developers have repeatedly failed to heed warnings to halt the project until the required permits are in hand with Sub-District officers now threatening to seize construction equipment if the latest warning continues to be ignored.

A spokesperson for Halcyon Villas told balidiscovery.com on Monday, May 2, 2005, that they had just spoken to the Contractor for the project who had assured them that all permits were in an 'advanced stage' and "would be in hand in the coming days."

Continuing Crackdown Across the Island

As reported previously on balidiscovery.com in [ Crackdown on Bali's Beach Builders ], Sub-District officials in several parts of the island are increasing their scrutiny of villa owners who construct projects without the required permits or in violation of local zoning rules, such as the 100-meter no-build zone from the high water mark.

The Indonesian-language Bali Post in its April 30, 2005 edition reported that the builders of the Villa Kalinka and the nearby Villa Boeddha have both received formal warnings to halt construction until all the required permits are in place with a teask force from the regional legislature scheduled to inspect the building sites in the near future.


The Greenhouse Effect
Ubud's Newest Dining Sensation Opens at Pertiwi Resort and Spa on Jalan Monkey Forest.

A live jazz band, fashion models, drinks and canapés were on hand to welcome friends and travel industry colleagues at the official opening of the The Greenhouse - Ubud latest addition to swank dining venues on Friday, April 29, 2005.

Located on Jalan Monkey Forest, adjacent to the Pertiwi Resort and Spa - Greenhouse's bold design features large windows, a minimalist approach to interior design, and a healthy natural menu using only the finest and freshest local ingredients.

To learn more about this exciting addition to Ubud's restaurant scene read [ Ubud's Pertiwi Resort & Spa Opens the Greenhouse] from balidiscovery.com .

Featured on balidiscovery.com are snapshots from Greenhouse's gala opening party, including a picture of its proud owner, Dewa Gede Putra Arimbawa, standing before the restaurant's green neon signboard next to Resort and Restaurant Manager, Wayan Supandi.




Rotary Club 's 7th Annual Charity Golf Tournament
Two Days of Competition and Prizes at Bali Handara Kosaido Golf & Country Club May 21-22, 2005.

Rotary Club Bali Nusa Dua will sponsor its 7th annual charity golf tournament at Bali Handara Kosaido Golf and Country Club located in Bali's mountain-lake district near Bedugul on Saturday and Sunday, May 21-22, 2005.

Trophies and prizes in 10 separate categories for men and women players will be up for grabs with all funds raised via the event going to vital community projects sponsored by Rotary.

Cost and Registration

Golf players pay only Rp. 1,250,000 (approximately US$128) which covers one person in twin-sharing accommodation for 1 night, 2 games of golf, 1 dinner, 1 breakfast, an award's luncheon and an entry in a Luck drawn. A single room supplement of Rp. 150,000 (approximately US$15.30) is also available.

Non-players joining the weekend pay only Rp. 500,000 (approximately US$51.00) for half of a twin-share room for one night accommodation, 1 dinner, 1 breakfast, and attendance at the award's luncheon.

For more information telephone Edward Naus at ++62-(0)8155722178 or Jo Rosarius at ++62-(0)811393635.



Trafficking in Confusion
Major Changes Introduced to Kuta's Traffic Grid.

Starting from Sunday, May 1, 2005, a number of major changes in traffic flows and one-way streets will be introduced on a trial basis in Seminyak, Kuta and Legian areas in an effort by Bali authorities to alleviate vehicular congestion in those areas.

An area of Bali whose existing maze of one way streets and cul-de-sacs can leave people confused even at the best of times, the many changes just introduced are likely to create added confusion during their implementation phase.

In an effort to help people plot their journeys, here's a brief summary of some of the changes you're likely to encounter on your next visit to Seminyak, Kuta and Legian:

Jalan Arjuna to operate as a one-way street exiting on Jalan Werkudara, also a one-way street, exiting onto Jalan Legian.

Jalan Legian between Bemo Corner and the Jalan Melasti/Jalan Sriwijaya intersection is still a one-way street BUT now running in the opposite direction, from south to north.

Jalan Patih Jelantik connecting Jalan Legian to Lapangan Tri Sakti remains a one-way street BUT now running in the opposite direction, running from west to east.

Jalan Pantai Kuta connecting Bemo Corner to the Hard Rock Hotel is partially a one-way street going in the opposite direction of west to east starting from Jalan Dewi Sartika and exiting at Bemo Corner.

Jalan Pantai Kuta lremains a one-way street following the beach starting from its new feeder street, Jalan Dewi Sartika, which now becomes a one-way street running south to north, past the front of Matahari Department store.

Jalan Dewi Sartika in front of Kuta Square is now a one way street running south to north (motorcyles excepted).

Jalan Raya Kuta connecting the Jalan Singosari and Jalan Raya Kuta intersections which was formerly one-way heading south to north is now open to two-way traffic.

Kuta area road-side shops are reported to be doing a brisk business in traffic maps and St. Christopher medals.



Garuda Indonesia Sees Red in Q1 2005
National Airline's Losses Mount at US$14 Million for Q1 2005. Fuels Surcharges Planned on Australian and Middle-Eastern Services.

Garuda Indonesia - the national flag carrier of Indonesia, reported losses during the first 3 months of 2005 totaling Rp. 139 billion (approximately US$14.5 million). On a daily basis, that's equal to a loss of Rp. 1.54 billion (approximately US$157,500) each and every operational day - a total slightly better than the estimated Rp. 1.6 billion lost during every day of operation by Garuda in 2004. On a quarter to quarter comparison basis, however, Garuda's first quarter losses are 89% larger than the same period a year before fueling concern that the final numbers for 2005 may exceed the Rp. 618 billion operating loss (approximately US$63 million) posted in 2004.

Speaking to the Indonesian-language daily Kompas, the Airline's newly-appointed President Director, Emirsyah Satar, said that the Airline lost money on 65% of its 33 international routes while suffering losses on 71% of its 27 domestic routes.

Garuda is burdened with debts of US$ 826 million requiring yearly repayments totaling US$110 million. With targeted "break-even" annual revenues for 2005 of only Rp. 10.6 trillion (approximately US$ 1.1 billion) there is genuine concern among Garuda's management funds in hand will be insufficient to meet the Company's debt service. As a result, Garuda's bosses will soon be meeting in coming days with the European Credit Agency - the creditor who holds the Airline's debt, to seek a further rescheduling of their current debt load.

Garuda operates a total of 57 aircraft, 26 of which are Boeing 747-400's. At the height of its corporate glory, the airline flew to both the U.S.A. and Europe and was the largest airline in the Southern hemisphere. In recent years, however, Garuda has shrunk to become a shadow of its former self now serving destinations only within Austral-Asia and the Middle-East.

In a step to counteract the effect of rising fuel costs, the Jakarta Post reports that Garuda plans to impose a US$25 surcharge on flights operating between Australia and Indoneisa and US$12 on flights between Indonesia and the Middle-East.



Giving Illegal Money Changers a Black Eye
Legian Villagers Beat an Illegal Money Changer Caught Cheating an Australian Tourist.

On Wednesday, April 27, 2005, an Australian tourists, identified in the press only as "Miss Merry," tried to change US$225 into Indonesian Rupiahs at John's Shop, located in the mid-Legian area. A short time later, Miss Merry ended up literally giving a black eye to one of Bali's numerous dishonest money-changer.

As reported in the Indonesian-language Bali Post, Miss Merry and a traveling companion were lured into John's Shop by a sign falsely proclaiming the location as an authorized money changer. Once inside, they exchanged their money only to discover at the end of the transaction that they had been short-changed by the unscrupulous owner of the shop, Nyoman Yasa, some Rp. 720,000 (approximately US$73.50) .

Distraught and upset at the shoddy treatment received from Nyoman Yasa, Merry left the art-shop-cum-moneychanger location and came to tears whilst standing in front of the shop.

Young men and women from the surrounding community, standing nearby and participating in a local religious ceremony, saw the very visibly upset Ms. Merry and enquired after her welfare. Once the crowd determined the root cause of Merry's distress, a frightened Nyoman Yasa quickly admitted his fraud causing the crowd to angrily set upon the young trickster.

A short time later, badly bruised and beaten, Nyoman Yasa was handed over to the Kuta police precinct who continue to investigate the case.




The Launch of 'Piknik'
Bali Chapter of ASITA Holds Gala Launch of its New Monthly Newsletter.

The Bali Chapter of the Association of Indonesia Tour & Travel Agents (ASITA) held a beach-side dinner party at Sanur's Puri Santrian Resort on Saturday, April 30, 2005, to celebrate the launch of its new monthly newsletter Piknik.

The full-color publication 12-page inaugural edition, printed entirely in Indonesian, carries information intended to fill the gap in information and data existing among members of the local travel industry. With in-depth interviews with local tourism figures and analysis of news developments impacting on Bali's tourism scene.

Also featured in its first edition was an interview with Bali Discovery Tours' President Director, J.M. Daniels, examining the issues delaying the recovery of Bali's meeting, incentive, conference and exhibition industry.

With an initial print-run of 4,000 copies distributed to ASITA members and other tourism stakeholders, Piknik hope to eventually become a bi-lingual publication that encourages a lively dialogues between all components of Bali's tourism industry. Scheduled to be published once each month for its first four months of operation, Piknik hopes to become biweekly thereafter.

Preceding the signature endorsement of a symbolic inaugural issue by I Gde Nurjaya, the Chief of Bali Tourism, and representatives of all of Bali's main tourism organizations, the Chairman of ASITA-Bali, Bagus Sudibya, gave and inspiring and spirited address. Sudibya emphasized the need for Bali to take control of its own tourism industry by calling on Bali's government and tourism players to invest heavily and aggressively in tourism, striving over time to place majority ownership of the local tourism industry in local hands.

More information: Tabloid Piknik Web Site



Bali's Soaring Unemployment Levels Cause Concern
Local Economist Sees 4.8% Unemployment Level at Near-Crisis Level.

Current statistics from the Department of Manpower estimate that Bali's unemployment level stands at 144,000 workers, approximately 4.8% of the island's entire population.

According to the Dean of the Faculty of Economics at Bali's Udayana University, Drs. Made Kembar Sri Budhi, an unemployment level approaching 5% in Bali should be viewed by all as very critical.

Quoted in the Indonesian-language Bali Post, Drs. Budhi sees the salvation of Bali's workers resting firmly with three sectors of the economy namely tourism, agriculture and small industry.

The Need to Support Tourism

Pointing out that Bali's tourism is slowly returning to life, the respected Economist said that no efforts should be spared in guaranteeing the safety of holidaymakers in Bali. In the same vein, he said the Government must be prepared and able to handle rumors surrounding outbreaks of contagious diseases that have the potential of frightening potential visitors away from the Island.

Agricultural and Handicraft Sectors

He also called on the Government to pay attention to Bali's farmers, ensuring that markets for produce offering fair rates of return are preserved and developed. Similarly, Drs. Budhi said credit facilities must be simplified for handicraft producers in order to stimulate job creation in that sector.



We Get Mail
Balidisocvery.com Editorial on Bali Drug Cases Provokes Many Readers' Responses.

balidiscovery.com's editorial [Editorial: Bali is Not the Problem, Drugs Are] was picked up and reprinted by a number of overseas publications, featured as a lead-in article on Australia's E-Travel Blackboard and re-broadcast by an Australian radio station. As you might expect, it also brought lots of letters, excerpts of which we share below.

Nick Lawson, a travel agent from Australia wrote:

". . . . These nay Sayers put a wet blanket on people's holiday plans but are not seeming to convince anyone to stay home. I bet if any of these knockers were handed a free ticket then they'd go in an instant.. . . It's a bumper year for Bali which makes me happy as to boycott only punishes the innocent Balinese and not the guilty drug dealers where ever and who ever they may be. Happy Travels."

R. Brampton wrote to raise what he sees as inconsistency on local sentencing practices :

"I congratulate the Indonesian Authorities on their work and hope the case is proved beyond doubt against any drug trafficker who gets caught. The one thing I can't understand is drug trafficking can bring the death sentence or life in prison but terrorist found guilty get a much more lenient sentence even when involving the death of so many (and) affect permanently countless others who lost family, friends or were injured and disfigured. Maybe that is where the inconsistency lies. . .I visit Bali often with my wife and bring what we can to help orphans and locals in way of clothing & toys the last thing these people need is a drug distribution centre operating out of Bali."

Australian Tony Swanson took issue with our editorial and calls for a greater distinction to be drawn between Shapelle Corby's case and that of the "Bali 9" :

"I generally enjoy your weekly newsletter, but today I found it very unfortunate that you draw a parallel between Ms Corby and the 'Bali 9.' That there would be anything like the level of support for the heroin 9 is an absurd proposition. The possibility of Ms Corby's innocence seems very real to many people, and this is a HUGE factor in the extent of support for her."

Sharon Camilleri of Australia wrote in :

"I have to agree with you - Bali is definitely not the problem, it is the drugs. . .While in Bali my friend and I got offered drugs but of course the answer was always 'no thank you' and it is not just Bali (this) happens in, it (also) happens here in Australia ...I also believe that no matter what country you visit you must have respect for their laws. I am hoping to return to Bali as I had a wonderful time while I was there I only hope that people do not continue to try and take drugs in and out of you beautiful country. I am hoping and praying for Schapelle and that your judges see that she is innocent and let her come home."

Philip Hilton wrote from Australia to say :

"Most Australians believe Corby is the innocent victim of Australian airport drug smugglers. They also consider the Bali 9 to be guilty. So I don't think you need to be too concerned about the Bali 9's conviction having a serious affect on Australian tourist numbers. Most Australians know your Police and ours work well together these days, and are learning to trust your Justice system. I have just booked for my 11th holiday in Bali and hope to continue visiting in the future."

Trevor Harrington, also writing from Australia, thinks the airline that flew Ms. Corby to Australia has missed its fair share of the criticism in the current case:

"As an Australian, I'm embarrassed by my countrymen who expect an Australian to be given preferred treatment simply because they are Australian. This applies just as much to identification of tsunami bodies as it does to the Indonesian legal system. Australians should ask how the situations initiated, rather than demand exemption in return for aid and assistance of tsunami victims. In the case of Shapelle Corby, I haven't heard a single complaint against the airline that had responsibility for the baggage and yet failed to cooperate in the early stages when a proper defense could have been secured."

Fiona wrote to insist she won't come back to Bali if Shapelle Corby is found guilty by the Indonesian courts :

"I agree that drugs are a major problem and have no sympathy for the 9, only their families. What they did was stupid and greedy, but Shapelle Corby is a different matter. I feel as do so many Australians that she is innocent. I don't think those drugs were ever meant to leave Australia. I have been to Bali 15 times and love everything about it but I will definitely not go back if she is found guilty as I am so convinced that she had nothing to do with those drugs. I went back to Bali 6 weeks after the bomb with no hesitation, but I just would not feel the same about Bali anymore if this poor girl is not listened to."

Jessica Pinkerton wrote regarding the hypocrisy in Bali's high profile street dealing in drugs when seen against the background of the current cases before the Indonesian Courts:

"I agree with a lot of what you said but I cannot agree with the way the Indonesian justice system works....guilty until proven innocent. When there is reasonable doubt, surely that must count for something. . .But when there is so much doubt surrounding the marijuana in Shapelle Corby's body board bag and there is not concrete evidence, I just don't see how you can demand life in prison. I think that is a bit hypocritical when you walk around in Bali and almost every 4th person offers you drugs. I am a yearly visitor to Bali and will not sign the petition to boycott travel, but I do think that Shapelle Corby deserves a fair trial."

Richard also writes from Australia to make a similar point :

"It is about time the local constabulary did something about all the drug sellers on the streets. On a recent trip I would barely walk 50 meters before I was offered anything in the drug line - and the sellers were quite blatant about what they were doing. Another point of dismay was the increasing offer to sell you pornography. So, who do I write to air these grievances?"

Also from Australia, Khatijah said :

" . . . I think that if you break the laws of the land you should be tried by the law of that land. But can you please tell me what a tourist should do when they are walking down the streets of Bali and having drug pushers trying to sell every kind of drug imaginable to them? Why aren't the drug pushers shot! They, too, are the scum of the earth and should be punished.......are they let off because it is the 'silly tourist' that buys the drugs that should be shot?"

Graham Hornel, a reader in Perth, wrote to say:

"Congratulations on a much-needed presentation of the rest of the facts, plus some realistic commentary on what has unfolded as a sad and sorry matter - one that has the potential to seriously damage both Australia-Indonesia relations and certainly Bali's tourism arrivals from Australia. . . .Drugs are indeed the problem and until law enforcement authorities in both countries combine to work back from the end user through the chain to the supplier, this situation will happen again. . . .Crack down very hard on those who openly sell death on the streets of Kuta and on those stupid enough to buy and then to use drugs in Bali and that will be positive progress. . . .No-one involved should be spared prosecution for involvement in any aspect of the drugs industry, be they Australian or Balinese, Policemen or Tourists."



Bali Sheraton Laguna Appoints New Managers
Janet McNab Head Sales While Former Pacific World's Eka Putra Gede is Named Event Manager.

Starwood Hotels Indonesia Vice President, Stephen Ford, has appointed Australian Janet McNab as Regional Director of Marketing Starwood Indonesia, including responsibility for the Director of Sales & Marketing Role at the Sheraton Laguna Nusa Dua Bali.

Janet McNab

Janet McNab comes to Bali from Sheraton Nanjing Kingsley Hotel & Towers, China, where she served as Director of Sales and Marketing and an Executive Assistant Manager for two and a half years.

Janet began her career with Starwood Hotels & Resorts at Sheraton Brisbane Hotel & Towers, Australia, working in various capacities including Convention Services Manager, Sales Manager and Catering Manager. In 1997 she was appointed as the Brisbane hotel's Director of Sales & Marketing.

Fluent in Italian, she holds a master of business administration degree from Queensland University of Technology majoring in strategic management and marketing.

Eka Putra Gede

Sheraton Laguna Nusa Dua Hotel Manager, Richard Suter, has appointed Eka Putra Gede as the Hotel's Events Manager.

A native of Bali and a 1991 hotel school graduate, Eka most recently was a groups, meetings and incentives account executive for Pacific World Nusantara in Bali, handling domestic and international accounts.


The Porpoise of a Good Breakfast
North Bali's Puri Bagus Lovina Resort Offers Guests a Breakfast Cruise with Local Dolphins.

A 2-hour drive away from Bali's South and a world away in terms of its relaxed and laid-back atmosphere, Bali's north shore holds many wonders to visitors who take the time to explore its beaches, vineyards, and ancient temples.

On a recent brief visit to the luxurious Puri Bagus Lovina Resort & Spa we also discovered another unique treat awaiting those who spend a night at this very comfortable and well-run resort.

Guests now have the options of bookling an early morning breakfast cruise aboard the Resort's specially-designed 17-meter teak outrigger cruise boat. Powered by 2 x 85 HP outboard engines, the spacious vessel offers a delicious breakfast while guest sit at their tables watching the sun rise over nearby Mount Agung. Shortly after you start your second cup of piping hot coffee, you'll find the ship passing Bali's original capital of Singaraja.

Comfortable and extremely stable, the breakfast vessel comes equipped with its own grill for eggs-made-to-order, radio communications and toilet facilities.

The highlight of the early morning cruise, however, is unarguably the frequent encounters with pods of playful dolphins that make their home in these waters. While the boat's operators wisely warn that dolphin sightings can never be completely guaranteed, the crew estimated that guest manage to encounter these majestic mammals on nearly 90% of all breakfast cruise departures.

And should you be unfortunate and miss the dolphins on your morning cruise, take compensation in the form of a quick snorkel over local reefs on the sail back to shore and then sign up for another night and tomorrow's breakfast cruise at North Bali's best resort.

Canadians at Home in Bali
Canadian Couple Make Kuta's Bali Hai Resort and Spa and Bali their Second Home.

Dr. and Mrs. Nicholas Rety are just two of the nearly 1.5 million foreign tourists visiting Bali each year.

Flying halfway around the globe, Dr. Rety and his wife, Eva Dimitrov, regularly spend six weeks in Bali, visiting in March and September. This past March was their 17th visit to Bali where they make their home away from home the Orchid Villa at the Balihai Resort & Spa.

"This place makes me feel at home. There is no glass barrier between you and the staff. The attitude is genuine-from the heart. And I found that staying at Orchid Villa is a simple form of life. This is a perfect end of the destination, where every day is like the embrace of a loving mother," said Dr. Rety.

In December 2003, Dr. Rety, a surgeon from British Columbia, Canada, delivered surgery equipment donated by fellow Canadians in response to the Bali Bomb tragedy of 2002. As a token of what Dr, Rety says is his fond attachment to Bali's "spirit of acceptance," the Doctor is bringing more donations on his upcoming visit.

When not practicing his much-in-demand skills as a surgeon, Dr Rety spends time gathering and re-writing personal journals and pictures to capture the experiences in life, dedicating them to his children and grandchildren. "It's like walking on the beach, you leave footprints in the sand, and if you look back at all the footprints behind you. You must leave some footprints in life." And, as you might expect, Bali plays an important role in his journals and writings, finding the island a never-ending source of inspiration.

Shown on balidiscovery.com are Dr. and Mrs. Rety relaxing together at their favorite Bali hotel.

 
Bali News by Bali Update
Subscribe to the Bali Update
Receive the latest news from Bali by email!

Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter and receive every Monday the latest information from the Island of the Gods.

Simply enter your email address below and join the community of more than 15,000 readers of Bali's only weekly newsletter.

 
Bali News by Bali Update
Explore the Archive of the Bali Update
Find related articles in our news archive!

The Bali Update is published since more than 5 years. Thousands of articles are waiting for your exploration.

Simply enter your search terms below and travel back in time with Bali's most popular newsletter:

Bali News by Bali Update
HTML-Archive
The links below provide access to the graphical version of the Bali Update.
Bali Update #451
May 02, 2005

Bali Update #450
April 25, 2005

Bali Update #449
April 18, 2005

Bali Update #448
April 11, 2005

Bali Update #447
April 04, 2005

Bali Update #446
March 28, 2005

Bali Update #445
March 21, 2005

Bali Update #444
March 14, 2005

Bali Update #443
March 07, 2005

Bali Update #442
February 28, 2005

Bali Update #441
February 21, 2005

Bali Update #440
February 14, 2005

Bali Update #439
February 07, 2005

Bali Update #438
January 31, 2005

Bali Update #437
January 24, 2005

Bali Update #436
January 17, 2005

Bali Update #435
January 10, 2005

Bali Update #434
January 03, 2005

Bali Update #433
December 27, 2004

Bali Update #432
December 20, 2004

Bali Update #431
December 13, 2004

Bali Update #430
December 06, 2004

Bali Update #429
November 29, 2004

Bali Update #428
November 22, 2004

Bali Update #427
November 15, 2004

Bali Update #426
November 08, 2004

Bali Update #425
November 01, 2004

Bali Update #424
October 25, 2004

Bali Update #423
October 18, 2004

Bali Update #422
October 11, 2004

Bali Update #421
October 04, 2004

Bali Update #420
September 27, 2004

Bali Update #419
September 20, 2004

Bali Update #418
September 13, 2004

Bali Update #417
September 06, 2004

Bali Update #416
August 30, 2004

Bali Update #415
August 23, 2004

Bali Update #414
August 16, 2004

Bali Update #413
August 09, 2004

Bali Update #412
August 02, 2004

Bali Update #411
July 26, 2004

Bali Update #410
July 19, 2004

Bali Update #409
July 12, 2004

Bali Update #408
July 05, 2004

Bali Update #407
June 28, 2004

Bali Update #406
June 21, 2004

Bali Update #405
June 14, 2004

Bali Update #404
June 07, 2004

Bali Update #403
May 31, 2004

Bali Update #402
May 24, 2004

Bali Update #401
May 17, 2004

Bali Update #400
May 10, 2004

Bali Update #399
May 03, 2004

Bali Update #398
April 26, 2004

Bali Update #397
April 19, 2004

Bali Update #396
April 12, 2004

Bali Update #395
April 05, 2004

Bali Update #394
March 29, 2004

Bali Update #393
March 22, 2004

Bali Update #392
March 15, 2004

Bali Update #391
March 08, 2004

Bali Update #390
March 01, 2004

Bali Update #389
February 23, 2004

Bali Update #388
February 16, 2004

Bali Update #387
February 09, 2004

Bali Update #386
February 02, 2004

Bali Update #385
January 26, 2004

Bali Update #384
January 19, 2004

Bali Update #383
January 12, 2004

Bali Update #382
January 05, 2004

Bali Update #381
December 29, 2003

Bali Update #380
December 22, 2003

Bali Update #379
December 15, 2003

Bali Update #378
December 08, 2003

Bali Update #377
December 01, 2003

Bali Update #376
November 24, 2003

Bali Update #375
November 17, 2003

Bali Update #374
November 10, 2003

Bali Update #373
November 03, 2003

Bali Update #372
October 27, 2003

Bali Update #371
October 20, 2003

Bali Update #370
October 13, 2003

Bali Update #369
October 06, 2003

Bali Update #368
September 29, 2003

Bali Update #367
September 22, 2003

Bali Update #366
September 15, 2003

Bali Update #365
September 08, 2003

Bali Update #364
September 01, 2003

Bali Update #363
August 25, 2003

Bali Update #362
August 18, 2003

Bali Update #361
August 11, 2003

Bali Update #360
August 04, 2003

Bali Update #359
July 28, 2003

Bali Update #358
July 21, 2003

Bali Update #357
July 14, 2003

Bali Update #356
July 07, 2003

Bali Update #355
June 30, 2003

Bali Update #354
June 23, 2003

Bali Update #353
June 16, 2003

Bali Update #352
June 09, 2003

Bali Update #351
June 02, 2003

Bali Update #350
May 26, 2003

Bali Update #349
May 19, 2003

Bali Update #348
May 12, 2003

Bali Update #347
May 05, 2003

Bali Update #346
April 28, 2003

Bali Update #345
April 21, 2003

Bali Update #344
April 14, 2003

Bali Update #343
April 08, 2003

Bali Update #342
April 07, 2003

Bali Update #341
March 31, 2003

Bali Update #340
March 24, 2003

Bali Update #339
March 17, 2003

Bali Update #338
March 10, 2003

Bali Update #337
March 03, 2003

Bali Update #336
February 24, 2003

Bali Update #335
February 17, 2003

Bali Update #334
February 10, 2003

Bali Update #333
February 03, 2003

Bali Update #332
January 27, 2003

Bali Update #331
January 20, 2003

Bali Update #330
January 13, 2003

Bali Update #329
January 06, 2003

Bali Update #328
December 30, 2002

Bali Update #327
December 23, 2002

Bali Update #326
December 16, 2002

Bali Update #325
December 09, 2002

Bali Update #324
December 02, 2002

Bali Update #323
November 25, 2002

Bali Update #322
November 18, 2002

Bali Update #321
November 11, 2002

Bali Update #320
November 04, 2002

Bali Update #319
October 28, 2002

Bali Update #318
October 21, 2002

Bali Update #317
October 14, 2002

Bali Update #316
October 07, 2002

Bali Update #315
September 30, 2002

Bali Update #314
September 23, 2002

Bali Update #313
September 16, 2002

Bali Update #312
September 09, 2002

Bali Update #311
September 02, 2002

Bali Update #310
August 26, 2002

Bali Update #309
August 19, 2002

Bali Update #308
August 12, 2002

Bali Update #307
August 05, 2002

Bali Update #306
July 29, 2002

Bali Update #305
July 22, 2002

Bali Update #304
July 15, 2002

Bali Update #303
July 08, 2002

Bali Update #302
July 01, 2002

Bali Update #301
June 24, 2002

Bali Update #300
June 17, 2002

Bali Update #299
June 10, 2002

Bali Update #298
June 03, 2002

Bali Update #297
May 27, 2002

Bali Update #296
May 20, 2002

Bali Update #295
May 13, 2002

Bali Update #294
May 06, 2002

Bali Update #293
April 29, 2002

Bali Update #292
April 22, 2002

Bali Update #291
April 15, 2002

Bali Update #290
April 08, 2002

Bali Update #289
April 01, 2002

Bali Update #288
March 25, 2002

Bali Update #287
March 18, 2002

Bali Update #286
March 11, 2002

Bali Update #285
March 04, 2002

Bali Update #284
February 25, 2002

Bali Update #283
February 18, 2002

Bali Update #282
February 11, 2002

Bali Update #281
February 04, 2002

Bali Update #280
January 28, 2002

Bali Update #279
January 21, 2002

Bali Update #278
January 14, 2002

Bali Update #277
January 07, 2002

Bali Update #276
December 31, 2001

Bali Update #275
December 24, 2001

Bali Update #274
December 17, 2001

Bali Update #273
December 10, 2001

Bali Update #272
December 03, 2001

Bali Update #271
November 26, 2001

Bali Update #270
November 19, 2001

Bali Update #269
November 12, 2001

Bali Update #268
November 05, 2001

Bali Update #267
October 29, 2001

Bali Update #266
October 22, 2001

Bali Update #265
October 15, 2001

Bali Update #264
October 08, 2001

Bali Update #263
October 01, 2001

Bali Update #262
September 24, 2001

Bali Update #261
September 17, 2001

Bali Update #260
September 10, 2001

Bali Update #259
September 03, 2001

Bali Update #258
August 27, 2001

Bali Update #257
August 20, 2001

Bali Update #256
August 13, 2001

Bali Update #255
August 06, 2001

Bali Update #254
July 30, 2001
 

Home · Bali Hotels · Bali Villas · Bali Excursions · Bali Sports · Bali News · Site Map