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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #528 - 23 October 2006

Where the Bali Hell are You?
Bali Spoof Ad Underlines Growing Frustration with the Long-Absent Australian Travel Market.

A small group of Bali hotel and travel operators recently produced a tongue–in-cheek video advertisement to draw attention to their growing frustration with the Australian market's prolonged recalcitrance to return to Bali for their holidays.

Seeking to launch a low-cost Bali awareness campaign, the Little Bali Hotel & Resort Company (LBHRC) tore a page out of the controversial Australian Tourist Commissions "Where the Bloody Hell are You" campaign and created an amateur-quality video narrated by a traditionally dressed Balinese on a walking tour of Bali asking where the Australian tourists had gone?

The guerilla marketing campaign by Little Bali Hotel & Resort Company(LBHRC) is comprised of two parts: the initial spoof ad program distributed by Internet followed by a program of heavy discounts to the Australian market.

The eight members hotels of LBHRC are the Baleka Beach Resort, Bali Ayu Hotel & Villas, Bali Garden Hotel, Puri Etnik Hotel, Samsara Hotel & Spa, Su's Prince Cottages and Villa Coco.

Australian visitors have traditionally ranked as the second largest inbound market to Bali with Bali, in times past, being the most preferred overseas holiday destination for Australians. Current Austrial arrivals to Bali are nown by more than -55%, following a second terror attack in October 2005.



Call for a Halt to More Golf Courses in Bali
Water, Land and Limited Road System Prompts Leading Academic to Join Growing Chorus to Stop New Golf Course Projects in Bali.

The Saturday, November 4, 2006 edition of the Indonesian language Bali Post carried the headline story: "Stop the Development of Golf Courses in Bali."

The article, quoting Sri Budhi, the Dean of the Economics Faculty of Bali's Udayana University, suggests that Bali will only suffer both economically and environmentally from the development of additional golf courses on the Island. According to Professor Budhi, seen from a profit-loss perspective, Bali loses much more than it gains from more golf courses. More golf courses will put added strain on Bali's already limited water resources in the creation of a facility only enjoyed by a minority in the elite economic classes of society. From a carrying capacity standpoint, the construction of more golf courses usurps Bali's very limited supplies of water and land, while placing added strain on an already over-burdened traffic grid.

The Professor called for the government to be more thorough in evaluating feasibility proposals for projects, such as golf courses, reminding the Island's bureaucrats that Bali already has 4 golf courses that are generally under utilized. Because of this, Sri Budhi suggested that the Government halt plans for golf course at Pecatu and Gianyar (Selasih).



Police Bust Bali Airport Theft Ring
8 Held with More Arrests Expected as Bali Police Crack Down on Airport Workers Stealing from Passenger Baggage.

Members of a special team from the Bali Police assigned to beef-up airport security made 8 arrests last week among airport workers in a raid to break a ring of thieves pilfering the contents of passengers' checked baggage.

Included among those apprehended by police were ground handlers, porters, and security personnel who reportedly had developed a sophisticated scheme to steal items of value from the checked baggage of passengers.

According to local press reports, many of the victims targeted by the thieves were passengers traveling to Australia and Japan on Garuda who had personal items - such as video cameras, digital cameras, jewelry, and personal music devices taken from their checked luggage. The stolen items were reportedly either removed from unlocked bags or from zippered suitcases easily opened by inserting a sharp object, such as a ball point pen.

Bali police are giving the case a very high priority because of its wider implications for airport security, with investigations continuing to determine potential other accomplices who may have facilitated the thefts.


M.S.U. Comes to Bali
Indonesian and Regional Alumni of Michigan State University to Gather in Bali December 8-10, 2006.

Indonesian and regional alumni of Michigan State University (MSU) will gather in Bali for a relaxing and entertaining weekend December 8-10, 2006.

Highlight of the weekend in Bali will be a "Green and White" dinner sponsored by Burhanuddin Abdullah, M.A. (1984, MSU Economics) who now serves as the Governor of Bank Indonesia and a friendly round of golf, also sponsored by Bapak Burhanuddin.

All MSU alumni are welcome to attend with transfers, accommodation, and special meals included in package prices starting from Rp. 1,425,000 (approximately US$151.60), twin sharing.

For more information and registration, "click" the email link provided.



Dance Like an Egyptian
Bali Skal Travel Industry Ball on November 17, 2006 Adopts 'Caesar & Cleopatra' as its Theme.

Join Bali's travel industry for a night of revelry on Friday. November 17, 2006, at the Annual Skal Travel Industry Ball.

This year's event, with a "Caesar & Cleopatra" theme, will be held at the Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel with cocktails commencing at 7:00 p.m. followed by dinner, music and dance at 7:30 p.m..

Dress for the evening is in keeping with the theme - so come dressed in togas, or in characters as gladiators, Cleopatra, Caesar, ancient slaves, or as a eunuch.

All are Welcome to Attend

Non-travel industry members are welcome to join in what promises to be a fun-filled evening.

Admission covers cocktails, wine, beer, dinner and the evening's entertainment.

Prices:

Rp. 450,000 per person (net) (approximately US$47.90) or Rp. 4 million (approximately US$425) for a table of ten.

For Reservations:

Telephone Gede at the Skal Secretariat at ++62-(0)361-7840212

More on Skal

SKAL International, founded in 1934, is the largest organization of travel and tourism professionals in the world with 23,000 members in 500 clubs in 87 countries. Members are derived from every sector of the travel and tourism industry. SKAL aims to promote global tourism by giving members access to its worldwide network, and also works to benefit the community at large.

SKAL Club of Bali was launched in 1991 and is currently the only club in Indonesia. Since 1997, the local club has raised in excess of US$40,000 to aid local orphanages and charities, as well as providing scholarships to Balinese travel industry students.


Garuda Ambivalent on Bali?
While Criticism Mounts Regarding Garuda’s Decision to Drop Bali as an International Air Hub, Airline Now Suggests it is Only Considering Such a Move.

The Indonesian language Bisnis Bali reports that the plan by Garuda Indonesia to end direct flights to Bali, [See: Garuda Drops Bali as a Secondary Hub], have greatly disappointed the Island’s tourism industry who see the decision by the National Carrier as "shocking" within the context of the many recent events that have besieged Bali.

The Head of the Bali Tourism Authority, Gede Nurjaya, told Bisnis Bali that the Airline's plans are "unfair" complicating Bali's role as an international tourism destination. Explained Nurjaya: "this policy will have an effect on Bali's tourism. . . it will cause a 'shock' for many, especially in the currently difficult situation.”

Nurjaya explained how Garuda’s plans to stop direct flights to Bali will make it increasingly difficult to attract tourists to the Island. Given the depressed state of tourism, he insisted, Bali needs the full support of airlines, especially the support of Garuda as the National Carrier.

"Separate from the problems within the management structure of Garuda, the plan (to stop direct flights) will at least temporarily shock the tourism industry," elaborated Nurjaya. The top government tourism official for Bali insisted that a solution must be found including the possibility of shared operations with other carriers to Bali.

Nurjaya questioned how a number of international carriers, including Singapore Airlines, Air Asia, Thai Airways and Cathay Pacific can routinely fly to Bali, but how is it that the Indonesian National Carrier has to end direct service to Bali?

Nurjaya called for research to determine Garuda contribution to Bali’s tourism in order to know the true impact of the Airline’s decision to end direct service. Pointing to the improving arrivals from Europe despite Garuda' withdrawal from that market, Nurjaya hoped that the effect of the National Carrier decision would be mitigated.

Open Skies for Bali?

Bisnis Bali quotes the Bali Chairman of the Association of Indonesian Travel Agents (ASITA), Al Purwa, who said he feared that Bali would lose its appeal in some markets, particularly the largest market of Japan which only stays for 3-5 days in Bali who will find the long delays in flying to Bali a disincentive to holiday here.

Expressing his amazement that foreign carriers can viably operate direct flights to Bali while the National Carrier cannot, he questioned why applications from foreign carriers for additional seats or landing rights to Bali encounter problems in the approval process? The ASITA Chairman for Bali said air access for foreign carriers to Bali should be liberalized in the face of the incapability of Garuda to operate direct flights to the Island.

Garuda Denies Hub Close-Down News

Meanwhile, TempoInteraktif reports that Garuda Indonesia is denying widespread reports in the national press indicating that Bali will be abandoned as a secondary air hub. A Garuda spokesperson, Pujobroto, insists that the Airline is only evaluating its networks, including the effectiveness of international routes to Bali.

Speaking to Tempo, Pujobroto said there were already many airlines that fly directly to Bali and that "not all" tourist come directly to the Island, with some stopping for business in Jakarta first. Because of this, he explained, Garuda simply wishes to provide the option of visiting Bali through Jakarta.


An Island to Die For?
Government Figures Showing High Rates of Suicide in Bali Have Local Authorities Concerned.

Bali has the dubious distinction of ranking top among Indonesia provinces for rates of death by suicide, according to results made public at a seminar held in Bali on October 6, 2006. Data collected counted 127 suicide deaths in Bali between January and September 2006.

A closer look at the data connected with suicide rates in Bali, according to information published in the Indonesian language DenPost, showed that 25 suicides occurred in the age group 31-40 years; 21 deaths in the age grouping 21-30 years; and 21 deaths among teenagers between 11-20 years.

A somewhat morbid fascination with the detailed statistical analysis of suicide in Bali was presented at the seminar entitled "Seeking a Solution for Suicides" which also reported that Wednesdays followed by Sundays were the days most preferred by those taking their own lives. Moreover, morning hours between 06:00 a.m and noon was the favored time slot for taking your own life in Bali.

According to the data, the overwhelmingly preferred method of self-destruction in Bali was by hanging (79.52%) followed by poisoning (15%), self-mutilation (2.4%), self-immolation (1.6%) and drowning (1.6%).

Bali's highest rate of suicide is reported from Karangasem, followed by Buleleng and Karangasem.

Male suicide outranks female by a factor 196%.

Poverty Not the Main Factor in Balinese Suicides

Speaking at the opening of a Community Outreach Office (Kantor Layanan Hidup Bahagia) in Singaraja, North Bali, on Friday, November 3, 2006, well known local psychiatrist, Professor Dr. LK Suryani, said that economic difficulties were not the leading cause of suicides in Bali, with family background playing a more prominent role in self-desruction cases.

According to Dr. Suryani, quoted in the Indonesian language Bali Post, while economic considerations may be one factor in local suicides, financial circumstances are a secondary consideration in comparison to psychological make up of the individual.

The new Community Outreach office in Singaraja will provide counseling services to local residents. The Kantor Layanan Hidup Bahagia's address is at BTN Puri Sukasada A/35 in Singaraja. Telephone ++62-(0)362-27275 or ++62-(0)8123964415.


Drop Reported in Visa on Arrival Revenues
Lack of Long-Staying Visitors Results in Drop on Revenues Generated by Visa-on-Arrival Fees.

State revenues generated by the visa-on-arrival (VOA) collected at Bali's International Airport and Padang Bai Seaport declined 34% in the second quarter of 2006 compared to the same quarter just one year before. Total VOA revenues during the April-June period of 2006 equaled US$6.8 million as compared to US$10.4 million collected for that period in 2005.

The causes of the decline in revenues are chiefly attributed to:

• The massive drop in foreign arrivals in 2006 following a second terrorist attack in October 2005. Arrivals declined 14.6% during the second quarter

• A change in policy that extended the period of the less expensive US$10 visa from 3 to 7 days, while the 30 day visa cost remains unchanged at US$25.

Length of Stay

Current tourism statisticsdemonstrate an average length of stay for foreign tourists of 6.16 days, with domestic tourists staying an average 2.01 days.



Yoga, Meditation and Massage in Bali
Le Meridien Nirwana Golf & Spa Offers More Lifestyle Options with Opening of Yoga and Meditation Center.

Bali's luxurious Le Meridien Nirwana Golf & Spa Resort recently opened recently opened a dedicated Yoga and Meditation Center at the sprawling 103-acre complex stretching along a dramatic Indian Ocean seascape.

Part of a repositioning for the Resort as a lifestyle destination, the Yoga and Meditation Center joins the other world-class facilities already in place at the award-winning resort which include swimming pools, water sport activities, a traditional Balinese spa and its Greg Norman 18-hole Championships Golf Course.

The new Yoga and Meditation Center is complemented by a Health and Spa Bar serving light fare, freshly blended juices, herbal teas and salads.

The Spa offers guests the opportunity to pamper and invigorate themselves via a wide variety of health and beauty treatments offered in both indoor and outdoor settings. Treatments can be taken in either an outdoor bale, with spectacular views of the adjacent ocean, or in the privacy of a guest's room or suite.

An entire range of massages and treatments are presented, each designed to enhance the relive the stress of daily living and enhance well-being. The Spa's signature treatment is the Nirwana Lulur - a soothing Balinese massage followed by a traditional body cleansing that uses traditional Indonesian herb and spices to exfoliate the skin.

Shown on balidiscovery.com are pictures from the resorts new Yoga and Meditation Center and Spa.

Spa Lounge Cendana Restaurant Waterfall
Spa Garden Relaxation Yoga
Click thumbnails to enlarge!






Interview: David Hall on Selling MICE in Indonesia
Expert on Managing Conference and Visitor Bureaus Shares His Views on Selling Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions in Indonesia.

As reported on balidiscovery.com, [Minister Wacik to Establish a Directorate of MICE], the Indonesian government is growing increasingly aware of the potential of the MICE (meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibition) markets and the critical role they can play in the national tourism economy.

To shed further light on this important subject, balidiscovery.com recently caught up with David Hall of David Hall & Associates, an acknowledged expert on the subject of convention and visitor bureaus.

David an Australian who was born in England, has more than 30 years experience in the convention and exhibition industry.

His early career was spent in London, Montreal and New York in corporate public relations roles before moving to New Zealand. Since the late 1960s, David has been the CEO of various convention and visitor bureaus in New Zealand, Australia and Indonesia. In the early 1990s, following a one year contract at the Bali International Convention Center (BICC), he was invited to consult on the establishment of the Jakarta Convention Bureau, resident in the capital from 1993 to 1997.

A board member of the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA), the International Association of Convention and Visitor Bureaux (IACVB), and The Asian Association of Convention and Visitor Bureaux (AACVB) - David also served as the President of the Association of Australian Convention Bureaux (AACB) for five years. He authored the governmental submission on construction of the Adelaide Convention Centre, and was the consultant on the start-up of convention bureaus in Jakarta, Istanbul, Cape Town and Sarawak Malaysia.

During the past 12 years, with his own company David Hall and Associates, he has consulted to various governments and destinations in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe, Australia and New Zealand on the development and operation of convention & visitor bureaus and the international marketing requirements for dedicated convention and exhibition facilities. His most recent assignment this year was the establishment of the Sarawak Convention Bureau (Malaysia).

The Editor of Bali Update from Balidiscovery.com was fortunate to catch up recently with David Hall and tap in on his considerable expertise durig the following exclusive interview.

David Hall – The Interview

Balidiscovery.com: Jakarta took the initiative 15 years ago and under your guidance established the Jakarta Convention Bureau, but it would appear, certainly at a national level, that little or nothing has been done to capitalize on that initiative.

David Hall: I am not being critical of Indonesia, the destination and its MICE Directorate idea. It is just on ten years since I left Jakarta after four very challenging but happy and exciting years establishing the Jakarta Convention Bureau. Naturally I have a genuine heartfelt interest and bond with Indonesia but really do believe there is potential to do so much better when it comes to the highly competitive but lucrative MICE market. May I add that it is imperative for Governments to understand the long term nature of MICE marketing – it is not an instant panacea to shortfalls in other market segments. The long term understanding of the market must be matched by a sustained commitment of realistic funding.

Balidiscovery.com: Indonesia as a nation spends millions on tourism promotion, so why do you think it is not attracting as many MICE activities as it should?

David Hall: It needs to be recognized that whilst convention and exhibition visitors use much of the same infrastructure - hotels, restaurants, transportation as the leisure visitor, there is absolutely no similarity whatsoever in the marketing strategies required by both these visitor segments. In fact, and unfortunately as a consequence of the now widely used acronym MICE, the Incentive Travel component of that grouping also needs strategies totally different to Meetings, Exhibitions and the leisure sectors.

Balidiscovery.com: It is always difficult to convince any government that extra spending is required to meet the needs of what could be perceived as a 'boutique' segment of the tourism market. What would you say to the government to encourage them to consider additional funding for this specialized sector of the visitor market?

David Hall: Sadly, too many destinations, particularly in emerging nations, simply do not recognize the enormous social and economic benefits that attracting MICE business can provide across the whole community. Its not just about delegates spending four or five days in a destination, and indeed up to five times (more) expenditure per delegate than the leisure tourist, but much more important is the longer term benefits through investments and joint ventures that flow by attracting influential business people from around the world to attend meetings and exhibitions. Interestingly, research is showing that some destinations are attracting up to 50% of delegates returning as leisure visitors within five years of their initial visitation as a convention or exhibition delegate.

To achieve sustainable growth, in what I have already stated is a fiercely competitive market, requires a well planned, long-term commitment by governments in funding the marketing needs of an appropriately structured body such as an impartial and unbiased Convention Bureau. In terms of the Republic of Indonesia's Convention Bureaus, (it must demonstrate) a return to the community with well-structured strategic marketing plans which recognize and abide by the two fundamentals of successful convention marketing; that it must be a 'pragmatic' and a 'systematic' approach.

Balidiscovery.com: If additional funds were made available, how would you suggest it be allocated to increase MICE business to Indonesia?

David Hall: Put simply, in the international Association Meeting Market there are about ten thousand meetings held annually, of which half have the potential to meet in the Asia/Pacific Region. However, the level of a destination's capability of attracting a share of this business is also influenced by various factors such as rotational policies, necessity of local host Association, etc. When all these factors are taken into consideration, any one destination will find the final list of potential meetings they can attract is down to several hundred. So, why not focus and concentrate on these qualified potential pieces of business?

Unfortunately too much time, effort and therefore unnecessary expenditure is thrown at too large a target before the essential 'research and qualify' criteria are applied.

Balidiscovery.com: There is bound to be some opposition to the suggestion of more government funds being directed into this lucrative niche of the tourism industry. How would you counter this resistance?

David Hall: MICE marketing is target marketing and, as I say, if the correct research effort is applied using such marketing intelligence sources as the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) much can be achieved at a reasonable cost to Government(s). It needs to be kept in mind that of the 600 plus Convention Bureaus world-wide, the average financial support from Government is approximately 80% of the total funding requirement. So, it's no use any Government saying that industry must pay - yes they will make some contribution, but they simply cannot and should not be asked to be the primary funding source.

Balidiscovery.com: What, in your opinion, is the direction required for marketing Indonesia?

David Hall: It is imperative to remember that a convention and/or exhibition is a business event, and, yes, having an 'attractive' destination helps but uppermost in the buyers' criterion for deciding where their event will be held (after of course first establishing that the destination under consideration has the capability to provide the required facilities and services), is "will my event be a success?". That assessment is based on the outcome of the success of the business conducted - not on how many golf courses, swimming pools, white sandy beaches, et cetera the destination has to offer. Indeed, one can oversell the attractiveness of a destination - if delegates find the swimming pool more attractive than being in a plenary session! In simplistic terms, the decision as to where a meeting is to be staged comes from the mind not from the heart!

And remember - these days with most destinations having purpose-built convention and exhibition facilities, having such (infrastructure), no longer gives the destination a marketing edge - it simply makes it competitive!

Balidiscovery.com: So what is your personal opinion of the establishment of the 'Coordinating National Convention Bureau/Directorate' and what are its chances of meeting the expectations of the MICE industry in Indonesia?

David Hall: For such a large country as Indonesia - both in terms of geographical mass, spread and size of population, just one national Convention Bureau simply will not work. It must be remembered, firstly, that apart from Western Europe, other countries get less than 15% - 20% of their total Meetings and Exhibitions revenues from the International Marketplace - the remainder is made up of local, national and regional business. This means of course that in large countries where there a several cities who have the infrastructure and services to compete in the MICE market, they will in fact compete with each other for business in all geographical markets.

I often find that when Governments are thinking of a single national 'Convention/MICE Marketing Agency' that they will 'direct' the buyers where they should stage their future meeting or exhibition. In reality the buyer decides which destination within a large country they will meet and cannot be directed on the basis that 'City A' had the last meeting therefore you must therefore go to 'City B' and the next piece of business goes to 'City C' - it simply doesn't work that way.

Personally I have always held the view that for Indonesia they should by all means have a 'Coordinating National Convention Bureau/Directorate' but that major destinations such as Bali, Jakarta (who already have the JCB), Surabaya, Yogyakarta and Medan - just to name a few, should establish a network of provincial convention bureaus. The criteria have to be, of course, that such communities have the capability in terms of facilities and service required/demanded by international meeting buyers. It is imperative, however, that such entities have very strict terms of reference and they do NOT – MUST NOT - become involved in the general tourism leisure market.

Balidiscovery.com: If the government invests more into the specific marketing of the MICE industry, what would be the returns and when would we see them?

David Hall: Attracting meetings and exhibitions is not instantaneous - it is a long term business. The time between identifying and qualifying the prospect, making and winning the bid and materialization of the event is rarely less than three years and often five, six or more years for international events. One to three years for national and regional meetings. Indeed, I would go so far as to say that as we hit November 2006 the chances of securing International Association Meetings at this stage for 2007 is practically zero! I mention this because Governments and indeed industry often ask from day one a convention bureau opens its doors - "so where's the business?" - "It don't work that way"...... is my response!

And finally, the all important return on investment (ROI) question. Using recent research data just one convention of 1,000 international delegates would leave behind USD1.2 million or IDR 11 billion. Over a four day convention this would include individual delegate expenditures, hotel and venue costs and then applying the multiplier return to show the overall economic benefit.

Whilst these levels of expenditure are impressive, I must again emphasize, particularly for a destination like Indonesia, that equally important is the undisputable fact that there are long-term benefits for the whole country to be gained. Conventions and Exhibitions provide a 'shop-window' on the destination with a consequence that by hosting these important Association and Corporate activities investment and joint venture opportunities will unquestionably be identified and the benefits will flow on to the community.


Ibu Cenik: A Living Balinese Cultural Treasure
Bali Hotel Public Relations Executives Spend a Morning with Ibu Cenik, a Living Icon of Balinese Dance.

Well into her eighth decade of her life, Ni Ketut Cenik is arguably the oldest "working" Balinese dancer. An inspiration to all she meets, Ibu Cenik welcomed the members of Bali's Hotel Public Relations Professionals on a visit to her Batuan residence on a recent Saturday morning.

Cenik Dance


Still very energetic, full of humor, and mentally sharp - Ibu Cenik is happiest when surrounded by young people. Accordingly, she regaled her visitors as she recounted her life's journey as one of Bali's most celebrated dancers. Born in Batuan Village, Gianyar, Ibu Cenik started dance lessons while still a young girl. Family lore portrays the youthful Cenik as a rebellious character – resisting restrictions and control in any form. As a young dancer, she tried the patience of those who tutored her in dance. Precociously talented and highly opinionated, she worked her way through several teachers in a continuing search for a mentor who combined her idealized mixture of wisdom, creativity and internal beauty.

Age and the passing years have not dulled Ibu Cenik's unwavering commitment to perfection in performance. Still regularly presenting the colorful Calonarang dance, Ibu Cenik brings her undying enthusiasm for the lively arts to each performance, always managing to move her audience via her riveting portrayal of Bali's most famous witch. In explaining her ability to retain command of a stage as a soloist dancer, Ibu Cenik explained: "When performing, you have to understand your audience; take control, look in their eyes and fly them away with you in your dance."

Eager to share the magic of Bali through dance, Ibu Cenik still regularly travels across Indonesia and overseas to perform. When not jet-setting to another performance or teaching formal classes in dance at Ubud's Arma Museum, this great-grandmother spends her time in the family courtyard, surrounded by children eager to absorb her wisdom, personal warmth and impromptu "master classes" in dance movement.

Living proof that you're never too old to dance, Ibu Cenik provided an impromptu dance tutorial to the members of the Bali Hotel Public Relations Association (HHPB) during their visit - with each of executives hoping to garner some practical insights on the techniques of projecting personal charisma and poise from a very lively, living cultural treasure of Bali.


Resignations at Bali Tourism Board
BTB Supervisory Board Members Resign as Chairman Issues Statement Defending Management Style and Use of Recovery Funds.

Five members of the supervisory body charged with monitoring the financial accountability of the Bali Tourism Board (BTB) resigned on Wednesday, November 1, 2006.

As reported on balidiscovery.com [Bali Tourism Board Under Attack], the BTB has been criticized for a lack of communication and transparency with the stakeholder organizations that comprise the tourism promotion body.

According to a report published in the Indonesian language Bali Post, the five members who resigned en masse from BTB are: I Gusti Agung Prana, Hadi Taryoto. John Ketut Pantja, Cok Putra and I Gusti Bagus Yudhara. In resigning, the five stated they were no longer prepared to share responsibility for decision made by BTB.

The resignation was tendered at an internal meeting held in Denpasar last week at which the leadership of BTB was criticized by the five who resigned the organization. Also joining the chorus of criticism leveled at BTB's leadership were Yos WK Amerta, the Bali head of the Water Sports Association (Gahawisri) and Rudy Antara of Bali Village.

Quoted in the Bali Post, John Ketut Pantja complained: "I speak frankly. The Chairman of the BTB cannot operate independently. If everything's fine, then why are members of the Supervisory Body resigning? The Chairman must correct himself."

In a separate press conference, the Chairman of BTB Bagus Sudibya insisted that he had clarified all the various problems surrounding Bali's recovery funds. Moreover, he reminded everyone that the Secretary General of the Department of Culture and Tourism, Hengky Hermanto, had attended the just completed meeting with stakeholders in order to clearly explain the funding issues which are, in the end, controlled by the Central Government.

Hermanto assured the group that all Bali Recovery programs are now underway in accordance with government regulations. He said that approximately 65% of the subject funds have been expended.

In a press release from the Bali Media Center operated by BTB, Chairman Bagus Sudibya expressed his disappointment, saying, "I'm just so sad that this negative sentiment has emerged. There have been a number of set backs for the Bali Recovery Program and this negativity won't help us help Bali. That is my key motivation, to do what's right for Bali's future."

In reply to critics of the BTB who claim there has been a lack of transparency in the management of funds, Sudibya said that these claims are based on a lack of understanding of the arduous processes imposed by the Government on the expenditure of funds for the recovery project. Explaining further, Sudibya said any promotional activities for the Bali Recovery Fund are self-funded, and only reimbursed by the Government through the Ministry of Culture and Tourism once the correct reporting requirements has been met. Sudibya added: "It would be helpful if more people were prepared to bridge the costs of promotional activities for the benefit of Bali out of their own pockets and risk the delays in reimbursement from the government. And, to ensure your company has the correct licenses and meets Government regulations in order to be able to implement promotional activities representing the tourism industry is a very complicated and involved process."

According to Sudibya, those companies holding the proper license to conduct the recovery events and prepared to pay the up-front costs and risks then the additional risk of being reimbursed on a case-by-case basis, and that only after each activity or event is completed.

The BTB press release explained that appointment of an event or convention organizer is subjected to a stringent selection process. The statement went on to say that the BTB only has the authority to propose potential organizations to the Bali Tourism Authority (BTA) who then selects the companies or organizations for final recommendation to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Finally, the decision on which companies are authorized to conduct promotional programs or events under the Bali Recovery Fund lies solely with the Ministry, based on the proposals and recommendations made by the of the BTB and BTA.

Defending the decision to appoint his own Company - Nusa Dua Bali Convex (NDBC) to manage a number of Bali Recovery projects, Sudibya pointed to NDBC's status as a company licensed to "partner with the Government on promotional or community initiatives."

Saying, "I aim to assure the public that the funds for the Bali Recovery Project are well managed," Sudibya presented the following chart showing the status of recovery fund spent to date:

BTB Budget
Click to Enlarge!




Custom's Service with Less Red Tape, Stiffer Penalties
Government Moves to Clean Up and Improve Efficiency in Custom's Office.

As part of the Government's pledge to create a more favorable investment climate through the reduction of red tape and corruption, the Indonesian House of Representatives recently ratified a new Customs Law.

Highlights of the new law, include:

• The eventual introduction of a fully computerized customs clearance system in accordance with agreements made by Indonesia under the World Trade Organization (WTO).

• Absolute time limits of 30 days imposed on the Custom's department for determining applicable duties payable on any import or export commodity.

• An absolute time limit of 60 days has been set in deciding any challenge filed by an importer or exporter regarding a duty rate or commodity classification for a specific shipment.

• Exemptions or lower duty tariffs for raw materials or capital goods required by companies classified as "pioneering enterprises."

• The provision of interest-free installment payments for exporters and importers in the payment of any duties due to the government.

• Export duties of up to 40% of value on selected items deemed essential to the domestic market in order to stabilize both supply and prices.

• Stiffer penalties for smugglers of up to 20 years in prison and fines of US$10.8 million.

• Punitive penalties adding 33% to the sentences for Custom's officials found guilty of involvement in smuggling activities.

• Payment incentives of 50% of any penalties imposed by Courts or half of the value of seized commodities to those who assist the Government in preventing smuggling activities.

• Substantially enlarged investigative, audit and inspection authority for Custom's officials in the enforcement of export and import regulations.


Ferry Fees to Increase in November
Passengers and Vehicles at Ketapang-Gilimanuk and Padang Bai-Lembar Crossings to Pay 20% More from November 01, 2006.

Official ferry fees for sea transportation from Java and Lombok to Bali are set to increase 20% effective November 1, 2006.

The government's approval of the 20% increase in ferry fees is much less than the 76% increase sought by ferry operators to meet rapidly escalating operating costs.

Acknowledging the difficulty of meeting the rising costs of ferry operators on the one hand without, on the other, creating public unrest by introducing higher fares for inter-island passengers, Minister of Transportation Hatta Rajasa has not ruled out the possibility of a further hike beyond the November 20% increase if operators continue to suffer unsustainable losses.


Governor: Stop the Extortion at Pura Besakih
Governor Orders A Clean Up of Con Men and Extortionists Operating at Bali's Most Sacred Temple Site.

As recently reported in the Indonesian language Bali Post, Bali's Governor Dewa Made Beratha called on the Regent of Karangasem to put an end to the extortion being practiced against visitors to Bali's most sacred Mother temple of Besakih.

The Governor's comments were made during commemoration ceremonies for World Environment Day held at the Pura Besakih Wantilan on October 12, 2006.

The Governor told his listeners how, during a recent commercial flight, a stewardess complained bitterly of the extortion encountered by her family during a visit to Besakih. Repeating the comments made by the Stewardess, the Governor quoted, saying: "Mr. Governor, why were there individuals still practicing extortion when my and my family visited Besakih? The guide provided good commentary during the tour of the temple, but in the end we were extorted. When we entered we paid for a ticket and other charges at the locket, but the 'guide' demanded more money and would not accept the Rp. 50, 000 (approximately US$ 5.30) offered, but demanded hundred of thousands of Rupiah."

The Governor also told of complaints he had received regarding traders operating at Pura Besakih who, according to tourist visitors, were defrauding visitors purchasing local fruits, such as salak. The Governor called on Karangasem Regent I Wayan Geredeg to take definite action, warning: "Guides and traders are acting irresponsibly and must be brought into line. Don't allow small problems to create greater damage and hurt the image of the Besakih, giving Bali's most sacred temple a profane image."

The head of the Regency's Control Team for Besakih, Drs. I Wayan Gede Mustika, who is also the District Chief for Rendang, claimed that local traders were resisting efforts to bring order to the temple area. Recently his team made formal complaints against two unruly traders to local police officials.



The Pied Piper of MICE
Plan to Establish a MICE Directorate Seen by Some as Too Little, Too Late and Reflective of Lack of a Structured Plan for Tourism.

As reported on balidiscovery.com, Indonesia’s Minister of Culture and Tourism, Jero Wacik, [Minister Wacik to Establish a Directorate of MICE],recently announced his intention to establish MICE Directorate in order to promote and encourage inbound conference, convention and exhibition business Indonesia.

Following the announcement by the Minister, the Chairman of the Bali Chapter of the Indonesia Congress and Convention Association (INACCA), Ida Bagus Lolelc, said the Government’s plan to create a MICE Directorate was a good idea, although the timing was late. In comments made by Lolec to the Indonesian language Bali Post, Lolec suggested the proper timing for the new government department was following the first terrorist attack in 2002 in order to address the numerous travel warnings and advisories that have devastated Indonesia's international inbound MICE market.

Lolec hopes the soon-to-be-established MICE Directorate will establish a priority of tasks, giving emphasis to inter-departmental efforts with the National Police and the Minister of Political Affairs and Security (POLKAM) to coordinate an international lobbying effort to downgrade the current cautionary travel warnings and travel advisories.

Claiming that the Government has somehow assigned national tourism a secondary priority preventing serious discussion of tourism issues on a presidential cabinet level, Lolec urged that the proposed MICE Directorate must be in possession of a clearly defined short, medium and long-term vision and program for success.

The well-known MICE operator suggested the following action points should be included in the working plans of the new MICE Directorate :

Short Term Programs

• A coordinated lobbying effort to remove or reduce the current level of negative travel warnings and advisories.

• The assessment and inventorying of all MICE assets and supporting infrastructure in the 12 national destinations designated by the government as MICE destinations.

• The upgrading and training of human resources to create awareness of the potential and specific requirements of the MICE market segment.

• The effective marketing of Indonesia’s MICE products through accurate websites and well-maintained data bases.

Medium Term Programs

• Concrete funding supports for the MICE independent of the burdensome and time-consuming State Budget Process.

Long Term Programs

• Concrete programs that strive for sustainability in all Indonesian MICE and tourism destinations through the fostering of a sound national infrastructure, and the furthering of a peaceful and just society living in peace.

SIPCO Chairman's Comments

The Chairman of the Society of Indonesian Professional Conference Organizers (SIPCO), John Ketut Pantja, called on Minister Wacik to worry less about operational issues and, instead, focus on strategic areas connected with the MICE segment, such as preserving Garuda's international route structure and simplifying the process for obtaining a visa-on-arrival.

Pantja also called on the Government to ensure that MICE operators in Indonesia secure certification an maintain a Rp. 500 million (approximately US$ 53,200) bank guarantee.

Jro Gede Karang T. Suarshana

Meanwhile, the President Director of Suartur, Jro Gde Karang T. Suarshana, offered a dissenting opinion, telling the Bali Post that the establishment of a MICE Directorate at this time was an inefficient use of money at this point of time.

Insisting that sufficient expertise already exists within the current structure of the Department of Culture and Tourism to support MICE marketing. Suarshana suggested that the establishment of a new department at this time was a contra-productive use of limited resources.


Bali Tourism Board Under Attack
BTB's Lambasted for a Lack of Financial Transparency and Poor Communication with Bali Travel Stakeholders.

A series of articles in the Indonesian language Bali Post have cast the Bali Tourism Board (BTB) in a negative light, suggesting the private sector promotion initiative group is badly managed, unresponsive and guilty of malfeasance in how it is handling the Rp. 67 billion (approximately US$7.3 million) in funds allocated for the recovery of Bali's tourism industry,

The BTB's Supervisory Board (Badan Pengawas) charged with internal supervision of the organization's finances has reportedly sent two letters to the BTB outlining complaints of a lack of transparency in how fund are handled.

The BTB's Supervisory Board - drawn from the leadership of BTB's stakeholder organization and comprised of I Gusti Yudhara, Hadi Taryoto, John Ketut Pantja, I Gusti Agung Prana and Cok Putra are reported by the Bali Post are calling for a complete accounting of Bali tourism recovery funds from the BTB Chairman Bagus Sudibya.

Local press coverage has called into question Rp. 1 billion in funds (approximately US$106,400) supposedly allocated for the Bali Tourism Festival. Meanwhile, the Society of Indonesian Professional Conference Organizers (SIPCO), who claim they were appointed to run the Bali Tourism Festival, say thay have received no funds which have reportedly been diverted to a company owned by the BTB Chairman.

One Man Show

The Chairman of the Indonesian Water Sports Association (Gahawisri), Yos WK Amerta, has now joined the debate, telling the Bali Post that the BTB Chairman has been running a one-man show creating an atmosphere that does not encourage a dialogue with the tourism stakeholder organizations.

BTB In an exclusive interview with balidiscovery.com, Chairman Bagus Sudibya has repudiated the claims being leveled against the organization he leads questioning his style of management. ([See:An Interview with Bagus Sudibya]) insisting that participation and supervision of BTB's operations is open to all members of the tourism stakeholder associations that comprise the grouping.

Bali Parliament to Summon BTB

In response to the public debate and growing controversy surrounding BTB the Chairman of Commission B of the Bali Parliament (BRRD Bali), Ir. Nengah Usdek Maharipa, has told the Bali Post that the Chairman of the organization and the Head of the Bali Tourism Office will soon be summoned to a hearing to examine the operations of BTB and the expenditure of recovery funds.

Meanwhile, the Chairman and Secretary of the BTB placed an advertisement in the local newspaper Tokoh listing BTB's achievements and defending their financial administration.



An Interview with Bagus Sudibya – Chairman of BTB
Bali Tourism Board Chairman Answers His Critics.

As reported on balidiscovery.com [Bali Tourism Board Under Attack], the Chairman of the Bali Tourism Board (BTB) Bagus Sudibya has come under intense criticism in the local media surrounding the management of his organization and its financial accountability.

Through the kind coordination of BTB's Executive Director, Wiwin Suyasa, balidiscovery.com was able to obtain answers from BTB's Chairman, Bagus Sudibya, on some of the issues populating the current controversy.

THE INTERVIEW: Bagus Sudibya, Chairman -Bali Tourism Board

Balidiscovery.com: What's your initial feeling abut the torrent of criticism unleashed against you in the press over recent days?

Bagus Sudibya: . . .understandable.

Balidiscovery.com: You mean, it's true?

Bagus Sudibya: No, not at all.

Balidiscovery.com: If the allegations are untrue, why haven't you responded to the stories in the Bali Post?

Bagus Sudibya: We (BTB) are prioritizing our energy and effort on the action that would give Bali the greatest potential return.

Balidiscovery.com: Does this mean that the current polemic and the many negative allegations are not considered important by BTB?

Bagus Sudibya: (Joining the) polemic will not bring any good to anybody.

Balidiscovery.com: Regarding charges of corruption in how recovery funds are handled that allege your company - Nusa Dua Bali Convex (NDBC) was appointed to handle recovery events – what's your response?

Bagus Sudibya: It's not true.

Balidiscovery.com: But, excuse me, isn't it a fact that NDBC –was appointed to handle at least 7 separate BTB recovery events?

Bagus Sudibya: : Maybe, but I don't know exactly as I am not executing all activities of my Company. I am spending more of my time for BTB than on my own company.

Balidiscovery.com: So, is it correct to say that your company got appointed to handle many of these recovery events?

Bagus Sudibya: I don't know. We have over a hundred activities.

Balidiscovery.com: Why weren't the various stakeholders not actively involved in these programs?

Bagus Sudibya: I don't understand either.

Balidiscovery.com: You've been accused of having an "One Man Show" style of management. Is that a fair description?

Bagus Sudibya: Maybe they (those that say such things) are right, but it should not be like that.

Balidiscovery.com: So, are you admitting that you are an "one man show" type of chairman?

Bagus Sudibya: No, I am not saying that. But, do I have any other choice?

Balidiscovery.com: Are you saying that you get little or no support from the BTB stakeholders?

Bagus Sudibya: No ...they have been very supportive, in their own way. You may (want to) ask them how many times have they been to BTB's office and lent a hand?

Balidiscovery.com: Bali Post reports says that you have received two written letters asking for financial accountability from the BTB Supervisory Board and have not responded? Is this correct?

Bagus Sudibya: The first enquiry was answered via a meeting with stakeholders held at the Bendega (Editor: a local restaurant) in August. Please don't hold me responsible if people failed to attend.

Balidiscovery.com: What about the second letter?

Bagus Sudibya: That will be answered at a meeting scheduled for October 31, 2006, but now moved to November 1, 2006, at the request of Mr. Hengky from the Department of Culture and Tourism.

Balidiscovery.com: What do you want to say at that meeting?

Bagus Sudibya: First, the person authorized to use the recovery funds (pejabat pengguna anggaran) is Mr. Thamrin Bachri, the Director General of Tourism. Second, the person authorized to commit recovery funds (pejabat pembuat komitmen), is Mr. Hengky, the Secretary of the Director General of Tourism. Third, BTB is in a position to facilitate the whole process and ensure that programs will benefit Bali's recovery. Fourthly, BTB will facilitate anyone who wants to know about the usage of the funds and will provide contacts at the Ministry in order to obtain a better and clearer picture.

Balidiscovery.com: When will the recovery funds be released?

Bagus Sudibya: Some of the funds have been released already. If documents and (the required) reports are done, the remaining funds could be immediately processed and released.

Balidiscovery.com: Some event organizers and stakeholders are complaining that no fund have been released. Is this correct?

Bagus Sudibya: Well, it might be that they haven't completed the necessary reports and documents.

Balidiscovery.com: What can be done to end the current atmosphere of extreme negativity?

Bagus Sudibya: Negative statements in the media help nobody. Therefore, lets us work in a positive manner. We have our promotional tag line ready to be launched. Let's show the world that Bali is entitled to their holiday visit and worthy of their admiration as a leading world tourism destination.



Stacking Bali's Arrival Cards
Bali by the Numbers – balidiscovery.com Looks at Arrivals through September 2006 from Bali's Major Overseas Market.

As reported on balidiscovery.com [A September Song], Bali arrivals through the end of the third quarter are down -21.92% when compared to the same period in 2005. Despite official assurance that “business is back to normal” there’s little evidence that the gap in business is narrowing with September 2006 arrivals month-on-month with September 2005 down -27%.

This installment of "Bali by the Numbers" graphically presents an overview of arrivals for January-September 2000-2006 from the following source markets:

• Total Foreign Arrivals – showing the seasonality of January–September arrivals has been maintained, albeit on a reduced level from 2004 and 2005, but somewhat higher than 2003 which was another "terrorist affected" year.

• Japanese Arrivals – September 2006 arrivals from the Japanese market are down -32.26 % from September 2005.

• Australian Arrivals – September month-on-month arrivals continue to occupy basement territories, down -55.05%. Perhaps most noteworthy, Australian arrivals are singular in operating at figures below arrivals in the post bombing year of 2003.

• Taiwanese Arrivals – Early signs of a possible weakening in Taiwanese arrivals may be contained in September arrivals, down -35.94 as compared to the same month last year.

•South Korean Arrivals – One of the few bright spots is the significant growth over the last 6 years from the South Korean market, up +1.58% month-on-month in September 2006.


Birds – An Exhibition by Carola Vooges
A Multi-Media Exhibition by Dutch Sculptor Carola Vooges at The Ganesha Gallery November 7 – December 1, 2006.

Ganesha Gallery's third exhibit of works by multi-talented Dutch sculptor, Carola Vooges, marks her digression into monumental free-standing sculptures.

The aesthetic pieces herald Vooges's expressive and conceptual intentions of extending a subject matter linked with immortality, high virtue and grace and a form that is sacred and manifest in myth, beyond its usual structure.

Through the shrewd use of an array of visual mediums including wood, chosen for color and pattern, a fragment of wave polished shell or a miniature seed pod as well as light and shade, Vooges coerces interaction with her art. Using scale, texture and material, she subtly detaches forms from their natural world beginnings and alchemically transforms them into zoological and anthropomorphic creations.

The sequential nuance of man made plumage and talon design elements throughout the exhibit evoke diverging responses to her visual forms. Juxtaposing reflective imagery and thought, her works include the provocative jagged beak-like tops of her totem-like bird series whilst other pieces draw on sensuous surfaces and curves to mirror her personal quest for a sense of balance against the backdrop of a complex world.

Indulge in a restful moment of sculptural commentary. Pause, examine and react to the visually aesthetic and expressive narrative of her pliant technique of manipulating conventionality . . . you won't be disappointed.

At the Ganesha Gallery at The Four Seasons Resort at Jimbaran Bay, daily from November 7 – December 1, 2006.

Gallery open from 10:00 a.m. until 6: 00 p.m..


An Evening with Adam Gyorgy
Famed Pianist to Perform in Bali Charity Recital on Saturday, November 11, 2006.

Although only 24 years old, Hungary piano virtuoso Adam Gyorgy can rightfully claim to be a performance veteran. Discovering the keyboard when he was only 4, Adam was only 16 when he won the National Youth Piano Competition in 1998 and 18 when he was named "Pianist of the Year 2000" in his native Hungary. An active and much-in-demand performer, he won 2nd prize at the Trieste Piano Competition for his interpretation of Haydn and a special prize at the San Remo International Piano Competition in 2003. A year later, he swept the First, Grand and Special prizes at The First International Chopin Piano Competition in Budapest.

Likened by many critics to Liszt for the virtuosity of his performances, the physical structure of his hands, and his tremendous interpretive sensibility - Adam Gyorgy is one of today's "rising stars" in classical music performance.

One Night Only in Bali

This Steinway Artists - a title acknowledging his leading position among classical pianists – will be visiting Bali for a single evening's solo recital on Saturday, November 11, 2006 at the Auditorium of the Bali International Conference Center (BICC) at the Westin Resort Bali, Nusa Dua.

Proceeds from this special charity concert will go to the Yayasan Senyum and the Bali International Women’s Association (BIWA) support for surgeries to correct cranial facial deformities and injuries. The performance commences at 6:00 p.m. with tickets priced at:

• VVIP – Rp. 780,000

• VIP Rp. 500,000

• Gold Rp. 300,000

Tickets and Information

For tickets and more information contact the following numbers:

• ++62-(0)818352644

• ++62-(0)361-7471672

Master Class

Adam Gyorgy will be conducting a "Master Class" on Sunday, November 12, 2006 at the Frangipani Room of the BIIC from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m..


Bali's 'Wunderkinds' of the Kitchen
Winners Announced of the 10th Annual MLA Black Box Culinary Challenge.

An international event that traces its roots of ten years back to Bali, the MLA Black Box Challenge celebrated it's first decade in style with a Gala "cook-off" between Bali's leading young chefs at the Nikko Bali Resort and Spa on Thursday, October 26, 2007.

Unique in its concept and execution, the Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) competition presents teams of young chefs with "black boxes" containing select ingredients and then gives the teams 24 hours to devise a three-course menu for 20 people demonstrating creativity and originality in the use of the ingredients. This year's black box contained a range of fine products including salmon fillets from Norway, beef and lamb products from Australia, and fine cheeses.

Each participant in a cooking team had to be a local young professional with a minimum of 2 years and a maximum of 5 years kitchen experience. In all, some 50 young Indonesian chefs from the island's hotels and restaurants worked feverishly to dazzle the more than 300 sophisticated guests who attended the event. An international panel of top chefs flew in to serve as judges and select which team would win the right to represent Bali in a national final against the Jakarta Black Box winner and represent Indonesia at the International MLA Black Box Culinary Challenge to be held in 2007.

Bali's Winners

The winners of the Bali MLA Black Box Challenge were:

• Winner: The Bulgari Resort

• First Runner Up: Four Seasons Resort

• Second Runner Up: Nikko Bali Resort & Spa

• Best Soup Course: Nikko Bali Resort & Spa

• Best Fish Course: Bulgari Resort

• Best Main Course: The Four Seasons Resort

• Best Dessert Course: Le Meridien Nirwana Gold Resort & Spa

• Best Table Display: Four Seasons Resort



More information: Black Box Dinner


High Altitude Swim for Peace in Lake Batur
American Endurance Swimmer Monte Monfore Crosses Bali's Batur Crater Lake as Part of UN Fight Against Poverty.

On October 16, 2006, Bali-based world-record ocean swimmer Monte Monfore made the first-ever-recorded swim across Bali's holy Lake Batur. "The Bali Swim for Peace and Against Poverty" was held in support of two major events: Dewa Sraya - a Bali Hindu ceremony conducted at Pura Tuluk Biyu Temple overlooking the mountain lake, and the United Nations Stand Up Campaign.

The epic swim, in Bali's mountain-lake district, crossed the crater lake of Batur situated at a height of 1,050 meters above sea level, a site considered sacred by the Balinese. After first seeking formal permission to conduct the swim, the 45-year-old Californian received a blessing from a Hindu priest at the lakeside Pura Jati temple.

Monte's swim connected the two holiest locations on the lake: the isolated village of Trunyan nestled under the eastern rim of the crater wall, and Toyabungkah at the foot of Mount Batur - a still active volcano. In a pre-swim announcement the endurance athlete dedicated his swim to "the beautiful Balinese people."

United Nation's Stand Up Campaign

Part of Monfore's continuing series of endurance swims in support of the United Nation's Stand Up Campaign, the American joined more than 23 million people worldwide and more than 300,000 in Indonesia who undertook community-based rallies and activities on October 15 and 16, 2006 as part of the UN's Millennium Development Goals.

The official goals of the campaign are:

• Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger

• Achieve universal primary education

• Promote gender equality and empower women

• Reduce child mortality

• Improve maternal health

• Combat HIV/AID, malaria and other diseases

• Ensure environmental sustainability

• Develop a global partnership for development

The Swim

Monte and Ketut Putranata, a local community leader, recited the Stand Up Pledge together with 30 children and ten adults. The swimmer and participants - from boatmen and children to gamelan musicians and priests, all wore white wrist bands as a symbol of their shared commitment to the Global Call to Action Against Poverty.

Entering the water at 3:40 p.m. the swimmer was accompanied by a small boat decorated with Balinese ceremonial offerings and carrying local Hindu priests, community leaders, and a gamelan bronze-gong orchestra which performed continuously throughout the swim. Fighting high winds and the frigid mountain water Monte made the three kilometer crossing in just under one hour (58 minutes 25 seconds).

The crossing took place just prior to the conclusion of the nineteen-day Dewa Sraya Purification Ritual at Pura Tuluk Biyu Temple in Kintamani. Held only once every five years, the Dewa Sraya Ceremony this year attracted thousands of devotees from across the island, who prayed for the restoration of balance and harmony in Bali and the entire world.

In Love with his Adopted Home

Speaking after the epic swim, Monte waxed eloquently on the many virtues of his adopted home, saying: "Bali is no longer only a place of transience for surfers and holiday makers. It has evolved into a place of substance. More than 20,000 foreigners live here. Many, like me, are planting roots and intending to spend the rest of their lives on the Island of the Gods."

Urging the world to continue to visit its favorite island, Monte added: "Bali is one of the most spectacular places on the planet. It has one of the richest cultures and most beautiful people in the world. This place is a tropical paradise with incredible scenery, fantastic beaches, and great surf. There's a reason readers of international travel magazines continually vote Bali the most beautiful island in the world and I encourage everyone to visit this magical place."

A Bali resident since 2004, the marathon swimmer holds numerous channel crossing records throughout the region. The Batur swim was Monfore's third UN-related event in six months. Earlier this year he participated in two World Food Program efforts. In May, as part of the worldwide Walk the World/Fight Hunger Campaign, the athlete swam a double crossing of the four-kilometer Bali Strait. In June, following the devastating earthquake in central Java, Monfore’s 12.5-kilometer Yogyakarta Earthquake Relief Swim raised awareness and support for victims and publicized WFP emergency relief efforts.

Related Articles:

[Stroking Monte]

[Monte Sets Record and Fights Child Hunger]

[The Full Monte]

Shown on balidscovery.com are pictures taken during Monte Monfore's swim across Lake Batur.


Bali Police Chief Sunarko Replaced
Inspector General Paulus Purwoko to take over as Bali's Top Cop.

After serving only a 10-month assignment as Bali's top policeman, Inspector General Sunarko Danu Ardanto has been reassigned to a new posting as Chief of Police for West Java, effective November 1, 2006.

Part of a mutation of 26 ranking police officers nation-wide, Sunarko's sudden transfer is claimed by national police headquarters as a normal rotation in assignments.

Sunarko, who came to Bali after serving as head of public relations and national spokesman for the police at national headquarters, will be replaced in Bali by Inspector General Paulus Purwoko who will be following the same career path as Sunarko, leaving his current post as head of public relations for the Indonesian police.

Sunarko, with his assignment to West Java, will be replacing Inspector General Paiman, the outgoing Chief of Police in that locale who has attained official retirement age.

Prior to his last posting as the head of the public relations division for the Indonesian police, Bali's newly appointed Chief of Police Paulus Purwoko served as the Director of the Semarang Police Academy serving simultaneously as the Director for the Jakarta Center for Law Enforcement Cooperation (JCLEC).


Bali Suffers an Island-Wide Power Outage
October 16th Blackout Blamed on Runaway Kite in East Java.

Bali's precarious balance in the national electrical power grid was underlined, once again, as the entire island suffered an electrical power interruption on Monday morning, October 16, 2006 when a 150 kilowatt transformer failed at Banyuwangi, East Java.

The failure, which apparently triggered a chain-reaction across the entire island, caused Bali to lose power at 6:26 a.m. local time, only to be restored more than an hour later at 7:52 a.m.

At a press conference convened by the State Power Board (PLN) and PT Indonesia Power an apology was issued to the people of Bali for the power outage blamed on a short circuit caused by a kite that fell on the subject transformer, causing a short circuit.

The electrical suppliers complained that power interruptions due to fallen kites was, unfortunately, a common occurrence, particularly in Bali where kites can be enormous in size.

Officials estimate that the interruption in power caused direct losses in power billings by PLN equal to Rp. 176 million (approximately US$19,200).


Minister Wacik to Establish a Directorate of MICE
Indonesia to Appoint Government Body Charged with Increasing Conference, Meeting and Exhibition Markets.

Indonesia's Minister of Culture and Tourism, Jero Wacik, has announced plans to establish a dedicated Directorate within his Department to actively seek out a larger share of the lucrative MICE market (meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions).

The MICE Directorate is promised to be fully operational early in 2007.

Minister Wacik announced the plans for the new Directorate during a press conference in Jakarta on Friday, October 20, 2006. According to the Minister, the formation of the new body has already been approved and only awaits the formal issuance of a letter of approval from the State Minister for Administrative Reforms.

The Minister told the press, as quoted by the Indonesian language Bali Post, that the MICE Directorate will be charged with promoting Indonesian destinations as hosts for meetings, conferences and exhibitions as well as coordinating services to the MICE market.


Fire at Pavillions Private Villas
Quick Response by Local Authorities and Hotel Staff Minimize Damage and Avert a Possible Disaster.

Quick action by security staff and assistance by local fire and police authorities managed to quickly bring under control a late-afternoon fire on Friday, October 20, 2006 at the Pavillions Private Villas at Jalan Danau Tamblingan No. 76 in Sanur.

One of the Villas security staff raised the alarm when he saw smoke and fire emanating from the living room area of one of the villas. Local residents and hotel staff fought the blaze until they were relieved by the fire fighters responding with five units to the scene.

The fire, thought to have been caused by a short-circuit that ignited the villa's thatched roof was brought under control within 30 minutes of its discovery with damage limited to the combined dining-living area of one of the villa units.

No injuries were reported and the occupants of the affected villa, a visiting family from Germany, were away from the property on tour at the time of the fire.

According to the Pavillions Private Villas Manager, Ms. Il Soon Kang, the remaining 13 villas in the complex were unaffected and operations at the popular resort remain normal. Repairs on the damaged unit, expected to take several weeks to complete, will commence next week.



World Parliamentarians to Meet in Bali?
Inter-Parliamentary Union Sudden Shift from Thailand to Indonesia for 2007 Meeting May Bring Prestigious Gathering to Bali.

The recent coup d'etat in Thailand may bring an unexpected windfall to Bali as Indonesia has been suggested as the replacement venue of the 116th Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU). The Thai coup and dissolution of that Country's elected Parliament caused Thailand to be declared as "ineligible" to host a meeting dedicated to promoting representative democracy.

Established in 1889 and headquartered in Geneva, the IPU is comprised of members drawn from over 149 elected parliaments around the world. The IPU decision to move the 2007 Assembly from Thailand to Indonesia came as some members of the IPU unsuccessfully lobbied for the expulsion of Thailand from the Union. Thailand’s membership in the IPU has been reportedly "frozen" pending the election of a new Parliament promised by the Interim Government to take place with one year.

While the final decision to move the IPU 2007 Assembly to Indonesia will not be confirmed for several more weeks, it is widely assumed that either Jakarta or Bali will be selected to host that prestigious event.


We Get Mail
Kintamani Tourism, Made Pastika's Health and Garuda's Decision to Drop Bali as a Secondary Hub Prompts Readers to Write in.

Readers of Bali Update and balidiscovery.com continue to write and share what’s on their mind.

Our coverage of coverage [Kintamani Tourism Suffering] continue to elicit readers’ comments:

• Mark Maxwell wrote to add the following:

"I, too, have experienced the frightening and aggressive behavior by both the Kintamani police/guards who shamelessly extort a 'toll' from tourists as they pass through the town, and the vendors who, from very young age, force themselves through the cracks in your vehicle and refuse to let go until you have either screamed at them or driven away while they hang on. I have visited three times in 10 years and the same aggressive and intimidating attitude was experienced each time. I would strongly encourage folks to avoid this area until the locals have worked through this problem."

• Alan Jacobs in Australia had the following reaction to the article [The Robber Barons of Bali] :

"I totally endorse the sentiments of this article. I have been to Bali twice (the last time 10 years ago) when I stayed in Sanur. I fell in love with Bali and have continuously read books and kept up with the news about Bali. My concern is that it is now becoming just another commercially tacky tourist destination and I am now hesitant to return to Bali as I feel I will be most disappointed. I know you can't turn back the clock, but Bali was something really special. I hope it can return to its roots - and the attraction to the honest, culturally interested, tourist."

• As a follow up to the article [Made Pastika Hospitalized] we're pleased to report that General Pastika is recuperating well. Concerned at the news that he was ill, Australian Chris Miller wrote:

"Made Pastika had become the face of law enforcement in Bali in the past, of the bombings and drug problems he gave the people of Australia who have been to Bali great faith in the fact the he was able to bring these people to justice and once again make it a safe law-abiding place .. i wish him well and a speedy recovery and it would be a very good to see more of him in our news service as a good ambassador in restoring our confidence in Bali."

• Maria Ziegler, a reader in New Zealand, had the following to say about [Garuda to Drop Bali as a Secondary Club]:

”This is really awful for people from New Zealand. We had a direct flight over Brisbane and this will be stopped after 18 November. I had already paid for my booking to fly to Bali on December 2, 2006. Now I do not know where I am. It is bad public relations of Garuda to accept payment for flights that are not going to be honoured. My poor travel agent will have to sort this mess out. I am of the opinion that this is very poor management of a company who had built up its standing as a recommendable airline. And terrible for Bali, the loss of so many visitors!"

More information: Tell Us What's On Your Mind


The Bali AIDS Quilt Memorial
Make a Quilt and Remember Someone You Know Who's Died of AIDS.

On Friday, December 1, 2006, Bali will join world-wide celebrations to mark World AIDS Day with the unveiling of the Bali quilts of remembrance at Renon Field at 5:00 p.m.

The stated missions of the Indonesian AIDS Quilt Project are to preserve, care for, and use the Indonesian AIDS Memorial Quilt to foster healing, heighten awareness, and inspire action in the struggle against HIV and AIDS.

The Goals of the AIDS Memorial Quilt Project worldwide are:

• Provide a creative means for remembrance and healing.

• Effectively illustrate the enormity of the AIDS epidemic.

• Increase the general public's awareness of HIV and AIDS.

• Assist others with HIV infection-prevention education.

• Raise funds for community-based AIDS service organizations.

The Bali launch will take place at the People's Monument of Struggle in Renon, downtown Denpasar, on Friday, December 1, 2006 at 5 pm.

The highlight of the launch will be unveiling of a number of AIDS Memorial Quilts made by individuals or groups of individuals in remembrance of those who have died as victims of the HIV virus.

The public is invited not only invited to attend this important occasion, but to also make a quilt-panel and send it to the Yakeba Foundation to be included in the Bali memorial.

Bali panels be sewn together to make an AIDS Memorial Quilt which will be unveiled on December 1, 2006. Completed panels should arrive at Yakeba's office no later than November 15, 2006.

For information on panel sizes for the Indonesian AIDS Memorial Quilt and quilt workshops, please contact Saiful at Yayasan Kesehatan Bali's (Yakeba’s) office ++62-(0)361-724699 or call his hand-phone ++62-(0)81558654470.

If you cannot send a panel, Yakeba is also seeking small cash donations for the event or some black cloth donations for backing the quilts.


Breeze Restaurant
Excellent Seaside Dining is Now a 'Breeze' in Bali.

The Samaya Seminyak Hotel in Petitenget recently reopened its totally refurbished The Alang Alang Restaurant under its new branding as Breeze.

Located along the Seminyak-Petitenget beachfront populated by some of Bali's most sophisticated dining venues (e.g., LaLuciola, KuDeTa, and The Restaurant at The Legian), Breeze shares the same magical location and reputation for memorable meals enjoyed in the open air of Bali's best seafront.

Following its recent renovation, Breeze is now larger, closer to the beach with a whole new modern, minimalist interior and exterior design.

A new, open bar adjacent to the beach provides an enticing invitation for al fresco drinking and dining at the bar or in an outside seating area providing conventional seating or comfortable sofas. In total, Breeze can accommodate up to 100 dinners either under cover or outside on the attractive deck surrounded by an elegant water feature.

Open from 7 a.m. until midnight and the kitchen is managed by Chef Torsten Schubert offering a blend of American and European dishes. A simple beach-side snack or a full-fledge dining experience; the choice is yours at Breeze Enjoy a simply elegant club sandwich or indulge with roasted lamb loin served with a crispy potato crust on forest mushroom and tow-colored capsicum sauce. Those seeking something more exotic can sample Mexican-Style barbequed salmon with curried corn sauce and baked courgette taco. Chef Torsten strongly believes that every restaurant in Indonesia should offer a selection of Indonesian cuisine, the basis of his 'Island Favorites' section, which includes Sate Campur, Nasi Goreng and Pepes Ikan – all very reasonably priced.

A wine list details the contents of a comprehensive, newly built-air-conditioned wine cellar holding over 100 wine varietals. Guests will find the wines attractively priced, and a handy rating system designed by leading wine educators useful in choosing the perfect wine to complement a meal.

Unique to Bali, Breeze stocks 12 different types of whiskey, including 8 single-malts. A relaxed beach-side lunch, sundowner drinks or a romantic dinner candlelight under coconut palms –all part of the experience that awaits at Breeze - the newest "Hot Spot" along the Seminyak-Petitenget beach.

For reservations, telephone ++62-(0)361- 731149.


Bali is My Life
New Branding and Advertising Campaign Launched to Aid Bali's Recovery.

In an effort to create a branding to complement recovery promotion efforts in Australia and Japan, the Department of Culture and Tourism have just launched a "Bali is My Life" campaign for strategic advertising in selected markets.

Based on the certain knowledge that Bali's brand equity is squarely founded on the island's culture and the warm welcome traditionally extended to visitors by the Balinese, the "Bali is My Life" slogan is used in combination with vignettes describing the daily life of each Balinese pictured in each add.



Examples drawn from the current "Bali is My Life" campaign are shown on balidiscovery.com.


Chartering Executive Jets from Bali
Luxurious Embraer Legacy 600 Now Available for Private Air Charter from Bali.

The growing availability of quality executive jets available for charter from Bali has been enhanced with the addition of a luxurious Embraer Legacy 600 to the fleet of VIP Aircraft available through balidiscovery.com.

Embraer Legacy 600

Configured to accommodate 13 passengers, this brand new business jet can fly 3,250 miles on a 7-hour nonstop flight.

The first Legacy 600 available for Charter in Asia. The jet is equipped with the latest avionics and entertainment system to make each flight both safe and enjoyable.

As demonstrated by the pictures shown on balidiscovery.com, the new Embraer Legacy 600 is the perfect solution for busy executives, artists and holiday-makers for whom time is valuable wishing to fly in or out of Bali in ultimate style.



More information: For A Charter Quote


Garuda Drops Bali as a Secondary Hub
ASITA Bali Chairman Says Decision to Drop Bali as a Hub is Now 99.9% Certain.

As reported on balidiscovery.com [Garuda to Abandon Bali as a Secondary Air Hub], Garuda Indonesia has apparently confirmed that Bali will be dropped as a secondary hub commencing from the start of its Summer Schedule for the Southern hemisphere.

Confirmation of the decision by the national carrier to re-centralize its operation to a single Jakarta-base was reported to colleagues in the Bali travel industry by Al Purwa, Chairman of the Bali chapter of the Association of Indonesian Travel Agents (ASITA), following a meeting last week with a member of Garuda's management team.

In explaining the reasons given by Garuda, Purwa reported:

Garuda claims it has lost large sums of money serving Japan and Australia with Bali acting as an air hub.

Garuda's managers claim that operating services from 2 separate hubs incurs costs almost on a par with operating two airlines. Reportedly, if an engine failure happens in Bali a new engine has to be shipped from storage in Jakarta requiring the charter of a special Russian aircraft, a process requiring 1 to 1.5 months during which the airplane remains idle.

• Negotiating traffic rights flying with other carriers serving Jakarta are complicated by the use of Bali as a secondary hub.

Garuda complains that landing and parking fees in Bali are too expensive with insufficient uplift of cargo traffic ex Bali.

Cities Affected

Commencing from the actual date of the change in schedules:

• Sydney and Melbourne Garuda flights will operate directly to Jakarta from where Bali-bound passengers will change to domestic flights.

• Brisbane and Auckland services by Garuda are suspended until further notice.

• Japanese service from Nagoya is also being suspended.

Garuda flights from Tokyo and Osaka will now fly directly to Jakarta with Bali-bound passengers changing to domestic flights.

Garuda will reportedly add more domestic flights between Jakarta and Denpasar to the increase in international passengers destined for Bali.

Predicting the Fallout of Garuda’s Decision

While it's difficult to predict the total impact of Garuda’s decision to close Bali as its secondary hub, the lack of direct seats from Australia and Japan can only further complicate efforts to establish recovery from those markets. Consumers from these markets will now face potentially higher air fares and trips that will now be 4-6 hours longer in flying to Bali or on their return trips home.

Meanwhile, many tourism observers will be watching carefully to see if the Government and Garuda adopt a more liberal "open skies" policies towards all airlines seeking more flight or greater seat capacity to Bali. Despite the poor arrival totals experienced by Bali over the past several years, applications by airlines seeking added capacity to Bali have often been stonewalled by the Indonesian authorities in close consultatrion with Garuda.

The Reaction from Bali

When ASITA's Bali Chairman, Purwa, was asked by balidiscovery.com to comment on Garuda's latest move he said: "Although we can understand the reasons why Garuda made the decision to close Bali as a hub, we are very sad to face these facts. Bali has faced so much since 2002, that we are really back to the bottom in tourist arrivals. With this decision, Bali will move further away from its tourism sources, including the traditional tourists sources of Australia and Japan. . . Adding between 3 hours to a half-day's time on transit, that is if the connection is not delayed in Jakarta, will make the passengers feel very inconvenienced . . . . Bali stakeholders should try to persuade other carriers to fly more planes to Bali directly in the short term, but in the long term Bali should its own airline, so that this favorite island will not be overly dependent on others."


Developing a Tourism Vision for Tomorrow
Tuti Sunario – a Much Respected Senior Figure in Indonesian Tourism, Outlines Lessons Learned and the Challenges Ahead.

Ibu Wuryastuti Sunario has spent her entire professional life working on behalf of Indonesian tourism. "Ibu Tuti," the editor of "Indonesia Digest" - an e-zine published by Strategic Communications that succinctly analyses Indonesian current affairs "in a nutshell." Formerly, she held the post of Managing Director of the Indonesian Tourism Promotion Board (ITPB) which valiantly tried to put national tourism promotion on higher, more professional plane. She has also served as the Director of the Indonesian Tourism Promotion Board for ASEAN, Taiwan and Hong Kong from a regional office in Singapore. She also once headed Indonesia's tourism promotion office in the United States.

When asked by balidiscovery.com for her views on the current state of Indonesia's tourism industry, she very kindly supplied the comments below.

Lessons Learnt From The Past in Constructing an Indonesian Tourism Vision For Tomorrow


By Tuti Sunario


In 1965 Indonesia started to develop Tourism almost from scratch. Those of us who were committed to Tourism, both within and outside government, actually knew very little how to organize and manage tourism. Therefore, many of us just followed our instincts, but most resorted to following Tourism Destination Management courses, in academies abroad, or through correspondence courses.

Thus we found experts agreeing that there are unchangeable basic principles and realities in developing Tourism, which are, as follows:

• If in any other production of goods, the product is transported (or exported) to the consumer, in Tourism, it is the consumer – the tourist – who must travel through, or experience the entire process to enjoy the product/service he or she requires. People must want to travel to Bali or Borobudur, for example, to enjoy the product. Bali or Borobudur can not be brought to the tourist (except now through secondary means of TV or film – but the experience is still different).

• Unlike other commodities, Tourism and Airline services can not be stored or stocked, to be sold later. Therefore, services not sold today are lost sales, as they can not be sold later. Therefore, continuous marketing and sales are essential.

• Another basic fact is that the tourist supply is rigid, whereas the tourist demand is very elastic. This means that the number of hotel rooms or aircraft seats available cannot be added or reduced overnight to adjust to market demand. Nor can a destination or a hotel be moved elsewhere when demand slumps.

• On the other hand, consumer demand may peak today and die tomorrow. Some experts even compare this phenomenon to swarms of locusts that are suddenly here today but gone tomorrow. Therefore, when, tourists suddenly avoided Bali as a result of past bombings, these tourists have many options to holiday elsewhere, and may or may not return to Bali.

• Because it is the tourist who must go through the process (from getting a visa, to buying an airline ticket, book hotel rooms etc., and enjoy these services) this means that each stakeholders in the production chain must work together to satisfy the need of that one single tourist. This follows that the government (this means national and regional governments) cannot do it alone. The private sector cannot work alone, communities cannot succeed alone, and airlines cannot do it alone. Therefore, in order to succeed, Tourism must be a joint and synchronized effort between government, airlines, the tourist industry and communities, and not to forget the media, to make it work within a specific timeframe.

• Since economic feasibility demands that there are economies of scale, meaning, that there must be sufficiently large numbers of consumers within a given timeframe to guarantee returns of investments, the marketing and sales of a tourist destination and its services must be guaranteed ahead of production.

That is the reason why, it is not enough for a destination or a country merely to campaign its "image" alone, separately from creating guaranteed sales, since this will be a waste of effort and expenses. Thus, although, "destination image" creation is a function of government, and "sales" is a function of the private sector, if it is for this reason alone, that the government and the private sector – including airlines – must work together in tandem to succeed, and not each going its own way.

• A number of positive actions that were made in the past to develop Indonesia's tourism, that can become lessons learnt for today is that the hosting of major international events were created as rallying points for cooperation among all tourism stakeholders, - from national government to communities - to reach the next milestone.

These are for example Indonesia’s hosting of 1974 PATA Conference in Jakarta and Bali, PATA Conference 1991 in Jakarta, the ASEAN Travexes held in Jakarta, Bandung and Surabaya, activating the Visit Indonesia Year 1991, the Visit ASEAN Year 1992, the Visit Indonesia Decade, and similar. These are milestones that were designated not only to become "promotional tools," but were meant to accelerate new investments in tourism. Many new hotels and convention facilities that were built just "for the sake of" PATA 74, PATA 91, were in fact built to be the next stepping stones to become the bases for further development, in making Indonesia into a major world tourist destination.

New rules and regulations were also made by the government to facilitate growth, which included visa-free facilities for major tourist markets, reduction in the tourism tax for visitors, etc. Structurally, the Public-Private sector Partnership was formalized in the establishment of Indonesia’s Tourism Promotional Offices abroad, the creation of the Indonesia Tourism Promotion Board, and the establishment of Pasar Wisata, Tourism Indonesia Mart and Expo (TIME).

In 1996, through such gradual and systematic growth, Indonesia managed to receive 5 million tourists.

• Since "Reformasi" in 1997, Indonesia experienced large transformations, from a highly centralized government to a very decentralized and democratic government. More than 440 autonomous regions have been created, transferring most powers from national government down to grass roots level. This includes Tourism.

Unfortunately, how this democratic, political transformation actually translates into real terms affecting Tourism destination development and the Tourism Supply, Marketing and Distribution chain has not been worked out until today.

This, I see as the major cause why Indonesia’s Tourism today seems to be fragmented, and therefore, losing its power and strength in competitiveness.

Latest ASEAN statistics of 2005 show that, while tourist arrivals to Indonesia have remained stagnant for almost one decade at around 5 million, other neighboring countries have shot ahead. In 2005, Malaysia received 16.4 million tourists, Thailand 11.5 million, Singapore 8.9 million. While Vietnam, a latecomer in ASEAN is closing in at 3.4 million visitors.

• In the meantime, in the past decade, the world has also moved rapidly into globalization and "Liberalization" while Indonesia was forced to look inward because of the many structural and political changes experienced. However, globalization and liberalization are today upon us, whether we agree to it or not, whether we like it or now. While we – including us in Tourism - are far from ready to be a competitive player in this new game.

Therefore, to come at par and become a respected player, first, Indonesia urgently needs a new Vision as how we – in this new constellation of the new Indonesian democracy on the one hand and present world realities in international politics and economy, on the other hand, can remain competitive. For us this means: How can Indonesia's Tourism remain competitive in a most competitive world environment.

Secondly, we need a common Strategy to achieve our common targets. We need a Roadmap with realizable stepping stones that can take us, together, to the next stage of development. The hosting of the 2007 PATA Mart in Bali should be one such momentum.

• Third, with Reformasi, Regions that have been given the constitutional power and autonomy should depend less on the national government, except for guidance and facilitation. Nonetheless, this does not mean that autonomous regions can do it alone. The basic principle of the need for all stakeholders to cooperate and work in tandem – of Public-Private Partnership in Tourism. still holds true. Now, more than ever. The private sector should also rally all their forces to unite all efforts, working together with concerned airlines, with regional governments and national government.

All these actions need leadership at all levels and in each sector of the industry. At the helm, Indonesia's Tourism, of course, needs a strong, and democratic, national leadership that can rally all funds and forces for us all to achieve Indonesia’s Tourism Dream.



A September Song
Bali by the Numbers: Despite Officials Assurances to the Contrary, Bali's Foreign Arrivals Numbers Remain Down -27%.

Foreign Arrival figures for September 2006 show that Bali has yet to regain the momentum lost following its most recent terror incident in October of last year. And despite official pronouncements that "business is back to normal in Bali," the simple fact remains that with 118,331 foreign arrivals counted in September 2006 arrivals are down a very significant -27% month-on-month compared to September 2005 (162,102). Aggregate totals for January-September show year-to-date arrivals are down -21.92%.

balidiscovery.com graphically presents arrival trends from October through September, tracking the effects of both the October 2002 and October 2005 terrorist attacks. While month-by-month trend lines exhibit a similar pattern following both incidents, the current recovery is operating on a higher plane with more foreign tourist on the island in 2006 than was the case in 2003.



Click images to enlarge


Some Crystal Ball Gazing

With arrival figures in hand through the third quarter of 2006 and barring any unexpected international or local events in the last quarter of 2006 that would have a negative impact on travel, balidiscovery.com predicts the following results for 2006:

• Using our trend-line analysis, Bali's foreign arrivals for all of 2006 will come in at around 1.18 million. That figure, if achieved, will be approximately 15% less than total arrivals recorded in 2005 (1,386,449).

• Statistically at least, arrivals for the last three months of 2006 will show a very marked improvement over the same months in 2005, bearing in mind that business plummeted in the last quarter of 2005 following the October 1st terror attack.

But, again, in an era in which the unexpected has become expected; any major global or local disturbance in the coming few months will automatically invalidate these projections.



Click images to enlarge


A Closer Look to Come

The next installment of “Bali by the Numbers” will examine September arrivals in closer detail, focusing on Bali's main markets and seeing which among them is fairing better in the current situation.



Click images to enlarge



 
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Bali Update #296
May 20, 2002

Bali Update #295
May 13, 2002

Bali Update #294
May 06, 2002

Bali Update #293
April 29, 2002

Bali Update #292
April 22, 2002

Bali Update #291
April 15, 2002

Bali Update #290
April 08, 2002

Bali Update #289
April 01, 2002

Bali Update #288
March 25, 2002

Bali Update #287
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Bali Update #286
March 11, 2002

Bali Update #285
March 04, 2002

Bali Update #284
February 25, 2002

Bali Update #283
February 18, 2002

Bali Update #282
February 11, 2002

Bali Update #281
February 04, 2002

Bali Update #280
January 28, 2002

Bali Update #279
January 21, 2002

Bali Update #278
January 14, 2002

Bali Update #277
January 07, 2002

Bali Update #276
December 31, 2001

Bali Update #275
December 24, 2001

Bali Update #274
December 17, 2001

Bali Update #273
December 10, 2001

Bali Update #272
December 03, 2001

Bali Update #271
November 26, 2001

Bali Update #270
November 19, 2001

Bali Update #269
November 12, 2001

Bali Update #268
November 05, 2001

Bali Update #267
October 29, 2001

Bali Update #266
October 22, 2001

Bali Update #265
October 15, 2001

Bali Update #264
October 08, 2001

Bali Update #263
October 01, 2001

Bali Update #262
September 24, 2001

Bali Update #261
September 17, 2001

Bali Update #260
September 10, 2001

Bali Update #259
September 03, 2001

Bali Update #258
August 27, 2001

Bali Update #257
August 20, 2001

Bali Update #256
August 13, 2001

Bali Update #255
August 06, 2001

Bali Update #254
July 30, 2001
 

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