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BALI UPDATE #570 - 13 August 2007

In Bali, God Doesn't Play Golf
Opposition Hardens to Proposed Golf Course Near Bali's Sacred Mt. Agung and Besakih Temple.

As reported on balidiscovery.com, recently surfaced plans to build a major golf resort complex on the flanks of Bali's sacred Mount Agung have met with strong opposition from traditional villagers, determined to stop the proposed 100 hectare project at any cost [See: Protests Mount Against Proposed Golf Course in Bali's North].

Following our initial report, the project has become front page news on all major dailies in Bali.

New developments over the past week include:

. Despite initial denials, the Regent of Karangasem, Wayan Geredeg finally admitted to the Bali Post that he had issued a "principal permission" (izin prinsip) to the developers, suggesting he perhaps forgotten these permits when claiming the gold course was "only an idea." The admission regarding his original issuance of the "izin prinsip" happened after a meeting with the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD) where legislators presented the Regent with a copy of the permit (No. 503/419 Disbudpar dated March 1, 2007) issued by his office.

. The permit was issued to a company named PT Nusantara Agung in the name of its director Hermawan Tjahjana at an address in Denpasar, Bali.

. Local press reports state that the address of the company listed on the project permit is an empty office in downtown Denpasar, guarded only by a watchman. While the identity and details of Hermawan Tjahjana remain largely a mystery.

. The Bali Post also reports that the issuance of the Regent's permit were preceded by supporting letters dated February 21, 2007, issued by the villages of Rendang and Tegenan, both occupying areas included in the proposed 100 hectare site. This was followed by a recommendation letter dated February 22, 20007, issued by the Sub-district chief of Rendang.

. The Chairman of the Bali Planning Board (BAPEDA), Drs. Made Adijaya, and the Provincial Secretary (SEKDA), Drs. Nyoman Yasa, told the Bali Post before meeting with Bali's Governor that the prohibition of such a development on the flanks of Mt. Agung near the Besakih Temple was absolute and not allowed under current regulations.

. Four members of the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD) met with Karangasem's Regent warning him that he "was digging a hole of himself" if he persists in supporting the proposed golf project.

. Bali's Governor, Dewa Made Beratha, has now joined the debate saying that if the proposed golf complex is refused by the people, he supports that refusal and respects the publics aspirations to preserve the areas surrounding the Besakih Temple.

. On Wednesday, August 8, 2007, student groups and local NGOs called on Regent Geredeg to revoke the izin prinsip he issued for the project.


The Pub with No Booze
Indonesia Customs & Excise Dept. Halts Liquor and Wine Imports Following Discovery of Duty Stamp Falsification.

A number of hotels and retail outlets across Bali are complaining of an increasingly critical shortage of wines and spirits posing a risk that holidaymakers to Bali may soon be without the liquid wherewithal for merrymaking.

According to a report in the Indonesian language DenPost, the Indonesian Customs and Excise Department have banned the import of all imported alcoholic beverages following the recent discovery of a smuggling ring using illegal duty stamps.

A number of leading hotels are complaining that new supplies of alcohol have been problematic for the past two months and supplies of wine and spirits are now in short supply. Meanwhile, the shortage is being manifested at local retail outlets where wine and spirits are largely missing from shelves with some shops closing there doors, at least temporarily.

Press reports indicate that a major importer/distributor of wines and spirits has lost its operating license in the wake of a shake-up in the Indonesian Customs and Excise Department and the uncovering of a smuggling operation using falsified duty stamps.

In the height of a continuing high season and major conferences facing the prospect of welcoming cocktail receptions minus the cocktails, hoteliers have called on the Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI) to petition the Government to help overcome the impending shortage of booze at local pubs and hotel.

Efforts by DenPost to obtain comments and confirmation of the current lack of wine and spirits in Bali from three main official distributors were unsuccessful.


The Need for Open Skies in Indonesia
Leading Bali Tourism Educator Calls for Declaration of 'Open Skies' as a Response to EU Blacklisting of Indonesian Aviation.

The director of the Bali Hotel School, Drs. I Nyoman Gede Astina, has called on the government to declare open skiesin order to overcome the current reluctance of European travelers to visit Indonesia and Bali.

Quoted in the Indonesian language BisnisBali, Astina said that the Indonesian government and national airlines must practice introspection and revisit the safety standards that are worrying to the European community. He also suggested that Indonesia invite member countries of the European Union to come to Indonesia and see the condition of Indonesian aviation first-hand.

The Need for Open Skies

Astina said the current embargo on Indonesian aviation must prompt the government to declare "open skies", allowing foreign airlines wider access to Bali. "This policy must be introduced as soon as possible in order to accelerate the recovery of tourism numbers to Bali," said Astina.


End of Winter Flight Specials from Australia to Bali
Fares from AU$745 from Melbourne & Sydney to Bali.

Garuda Indonesia is offering end-of-winter breaks in Bali from just $745 a person (plus tax and airport fees) from Melbourne and Sydney.

The packages - which must be booked by September 3 and paid by September 5 - include airfares, four nights' accommodation and bonuses such as transfers in Bali, free breakfasts and lower-cost additional nights, depending on accommodation chosen.

"With the Australian dollar nearly 500 per cent stronger against the rupiah than 20 years ago, there has never been a better time to go to Bali," says Garuda Indonesia Regional Manager, Southwest Pacific, Mr Suranto Yitnopawiro.

The offer applies to dates in September, October, November and December. Accommodation choices extend from the youth and entertainment-oriented through to more sophisticated and relaxing accommodation venues. They include the top value Fourteen Roses in the centre of Kuta and Legian; The Oasis in Kuta; the All Seasons Resort and Hotel Puri Raja in Legian; the Novotel Benoa Bali in Tanjung Benoa; and The Westin Resort in luxurious Nusa Dua.

Garuda operates Airbus A330 aircraft from Sydney and Melbourne.

Australian Government taxes and airport/airline fees and surcharges of AU$242.20 per person ex Sydney and AU$224.21 per person ex Melbourne. For departures ex Brisbane and Adelaide, add domestic airfares and taxes to/from Sydney and Melbourne.



Weekly Art Films in Ubud
Classic Cinema Every Tuesday Night at Gaya Fusion on Ubud's Sayan Ridge.

The Gaya Fusion Gallery on Jalan Raya Sayan in Ubud is hosting a weekly series of art films through October 2007. Held each Tuesday starting at 7:00 p.m. the current schedule of films includes:

. August 14, 2007: 8 - Fredrico Fellini (1963)

. August 21, 2007: Solaris - Andrei Tarkovsky (1972)

. August 28, 2007: Coffee and Cigarettes - Jim Jarmusch (2003)

. September 4, 2007- The Agony and Ecstasy - Carol Reed (1965)

. September 11, 2007 - Barry Lyndon - Stanley Kubrick (1975)

. September 18, 2007 - THX 1138 - George Lucas (1967)

. September 25, 2007 - Dead Man - Jim Jarmusch (1995)

. October 2, 2007 - Rembrandt: by Himself - British NET Playhouse Series (1980)

. October 9, 2007 - Dr, Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb - Stanley Kubrick (1964)

. October 16, 2007 - Frida - Julie Taymor (2002)

. October 23, 2007 - The Last Temptation of Christ - Martin Scorsese (1988)

. October 30, 2007 - Mickey Mouse Vintage Footage - Classic Mickey from the Studio of Walt Disney

For more information on Gaya Fusion's Tuesday Evening Art Films telephone ++62-(0)361-979252.


Modern Indonesian Masters
8 Senior Indonesian Artists Celebrate the 12th Anniversary of Ubud's Museum Rudana in a Joint Exhibition.

The role of a Museum of Art is to inform and educate! This is a common enough objective and one that could be expected of any museum. But Nyoman Rudana, the owner of the eponymous Museum Rudana, has purposely given this objective a supplementary function: his museum aims to be at the service of the image of the nation. And indeed, all the main exhibitions at the museum, have had, as their subject, Indonesian modern art - the sole purpose of which has been to establish the place it occupies, in the larger framework of international art - and, by so doing, to promote its international recognition. This attention, given to modernity in art in the national and international context, needs to be seen within the context of what is presently the museum owner's principal occupation: politics. As one of the four senators representing Bali in the Regional Representatives Council(DPD, Nyoman Rudana wishes to promote an image of Indonesia, and of Bali, that goes beyond tradition. He wants to affirm that his country is a contender on the scene of both cultural modernity and post-modernity.

Much has been written about modernism in art. Its presence in the international landscape has often been seen as a mere phenomenon of diffusion, as if the brands of modern art that now exist throughout the world were mere offshoots of a single Western trunk and, as such, were of little interest. What this viewpoint overlooks is that modernism sprang up under different circumstances in the West from in the rest of the world. In the West, it was self-generated, issuing from a questioning of form in relation to subjectivity that was closely related to the great socio-economic and cultural transformations of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In the rest of the world, however, it was exogenous. It was imposed top-down by colonization. Borrowed "modernist" form was never an issue per se. It became a simple garb in which artists expressed their local cultural concerns. The result can now be seen: as modernity is firmly establishing itself throughout the world, non-Western modernism, sometimes ambiguously called post-modernism, is coming back to haunt the Western world, its matrix: the modernist revolution is now dead in the West, and it is now from the non-Western world with its strongly localized art that the most original expressions of contemporary art are coming.

The exhibitions, held since its creation at the Museum Rudana, have been concrete illustrations of this phenomenon of plural modernism. This current exhibition does not simply aim at "comparing" Indonesian and foreign artists, as with previous events at the museum. The current event goes further and aims at illustrating what is Indonesia's specific contribution to international modernism in art: the insertion of an Indonesian ethnic symbolism within a modernist system of form. The logic of form espoused by the various artists in the show is undoubtedly that of modern art: exploration of color and form appears as a goal in itself, and does not seem to obey to any figurative constraints; yet, at the same time, carefully selected and often subtly connotative elements of figuration are present, in an obvious enough way to suggest spirituality-related forms of symbolism.

Eight artists are exhibiting at the present show "Modern Indonesian Masters." Among them are the greatest names of Indonesian and Balinese modern art. These eight selected artists represent the two modernist traditions of Hindu Bali and Islamized Java as well as the two schools of Bandung and Yogyakarta. These two schools are differentiated by the way modernism was introduced: it was taught as such in Bandung, but it infiltrated itself more spontaneously into Yogya, thus leading, in the latter case, to a larger share being given over to the ethnic component. All the Balinese artists included in the show were educated in Yogya, thus adding a supplementary layer to their adoption of the modernist principles of art. As the exhibition hopes to make clear, it is by its modern symbolic expression, derived from the traditional local cultures, that Indonesian modern art makes a significant contribution to international art.

Among the selected artists, two are from Bandung, Srihadi Sudarsono and Sunaryo, while the rest consists of Yogya-educated Balinese, Nyoman Gunarsa and Made Wianta, as well as the younger Nyoman Erawan, Made Jirna, Made Budiana and Darmika, all of whom, with the exception of Darmika, are well-established names in the Indonesian art world. The only newcomer is Darmika, whose star has risen only in recent years.

Srihadi Sudarsono

Of the eight artists participating in the exhibition, the name of Srihadi Sudarsono comes first. At 76, ever-productive, he is an important name in Indonesian art history. He began his career in the late forties as an illustrator of the national liberation struggle. In the early 1950s, while still a student in Bandung, it was his cubistic works that brought the accusation that the Bandung School was a laboratory of the West. After a short stint in the United States, where he studied on a scholarship, he settled into a long period of symbolic "color fields": in the most typical of these works - most of which were "horizons" - the layers of color, classical tools of minimalist abstraction, were enriched by barely visible figurative elements (offering, temple etc), so as to convey an impression of cosmic fusion between Man, Nature and the Cosmos. While working on this series, Srihadi became his country's most prominent colorist to the point where he could as in his "social" and "political" series from the 1970s, purposely "uglify" colors in order to convey a strong protest. Today, his concern is meditative, as illustrated by the extraordinary subtlety of his colors: his "Borobudur" series are studies in often barely perceptible color nuances; so that it is through the small white spot of light he puts at the very top of the great temple's highest stupa that the monument comes visually to life, poetically bringing down to us, to earth, the idea of godly transcendence. In his works shown at the museum, the accent is on ethereality, that of dancers between the real and the unreal, moving into the sublime.

Sunaryo

Sunaryo (66) is another star from the Bandung school. His work is characterized by a stunning breadth of skill. A painter, he also has a reputation as a sculptor as well as an installation and performance artist. His painting style, always highly artistic, is no less eclectic than his medium, sometimes abstract, at other times symbolically figurative in a poetic or social way - an illustration, if need be, of the fact that the "style" factor is always secondary to the artist's creative power. If Sunaryo's endeavor is often purely aesthetic, via abstraction, he is no stranger to making social statements through his works. One of his favorite themes is the encounter of "tradition over against modernity." He sometimes represents this in a symbolic way as the fight between a red barong mask and the forces of darkness, but in the present exhibition, the point is made bluntly by dancers holding a hand phone - modern reality and its related threat of the loss of cultural memory. Here the accomplished master casts aside, for a while, his aesthetic concerns and has us ponder on Indonesia's cultural future. He leaves the answer open. Another interesting facet of Sunaryo is his role as a cultural activist. His Selasar Sunaryo is one of the most active venues of modern art in Bandung.

Nyoman Gunarsa

The most senior Balinese artist at the exhibition is Nyoman Gunarsa. He was also the first Balinese to study at Yogyakarta's ASRI art school, where he was later appointed as lecturer. ASRI's lecturers all insisted on the need to "indigenize" Western influence and therefore refused to practice pure aesthetic research, as done in Bandung. In Yogya, Gunarsa was also influenced by Indonesia's great expressionist painter Affandi. His art is the result of these influences, skillfully combining Balinese subjects such as dancers and wayang puppets with the "expressionistic", almost "action painting" manner of modern art. His works typically consist of a softly hued background on which his brush draws in swift color swabs the canvas-size figures of Balinese dancers or wayang characters. Such a conjunction of softness of color, etherealness of form and dynamism renders his paintings magically appealing. By shrouding the expression of Bali in modern garb, Gunarsa succeeds, the first among Balinese artists to do so, to make Balinese art accessible to a wider national and international public. But Nyoman Gunarsa is not "simply" a painter. He is also a cultural activist. He owns Bali's most complete collection of Balinese classical paintings, which are on show for the public at his museum in Klungkung.

Made Wianta

No less important than Gunarsa is Made Wianta. Made Wianta, who first came to attention of Indonesians with his black and white works, after a stay with Balinese traditional artists. Shapeless monsters, nameless forms, the subconscious side of Balinese psyche suddenly spurted out as the obsessive expression of this strongly individualized artist. In the middle 80s, Wianta's attention shifted from black and white to color, from graphic lines to color dots, and from the figuration of the subconscious to the representation of pure formal archetypes: he thus became an abstract painter. His works have since been combinations of archetypal studies in geometry, calligraphy and color compositions - often in the form of colored dots. They combine elements of informal abstraction, op art and geometric abstraction. Many are based on dialectic of micro and macro elements, a reminder of Hindu concepts. Since the 1990s, Made Wianta has also come to our attention through his installations. His recent installation masterpiece was dreamland: an exhibition in a totally dark space of photographs of the "Bali Bombing" painted with cow blood. A strong statement on violence and universal call for peace.

Nyoman Erawan

Nyoman Erawan (55) is the master of what can be called Balinese abstract symbolism. His paintings look outwardly abstract but reveal themselves, on closer inspection, to be laden with typical Balinese symbols. Interestingly, these symbols are not, for him, merely instrumental or intellectual references; they come from the core of his personality. Besides being a modern painter, he is also a traditional sculptor and architect (undagi), for whom the symbols he uses have a living religious meaning: colors of the cardinal directions, Chinese kepeng coins, checkered black and white cloth, cosmic mountains etc. What he, thus, expresses in modern aesthetic language, and are accessible to anyone, are the Hindu concepts of eternal movement, of the life force surging and waning away, and of Man engulfed in this great cosmic whirling. Erawan's ideas are still better expressed under the form of 'installations' and performances with similar, but this time three-dimensional symbols. A whole school of Balinese artists is following in Erawan's path of abstract symbolism.

Made Djirna

Among Balinese artists, the collectors' favorite is probably low profile Made Djirna. Djirna's key to success lies in an uncanny mix of technical sophistication and thematic simplicity: the skills of the painter are put at the service of a simple vision of the world in which everyone can recognize some of his dreams - and nightmares. Djirna's favorite theme is that of Woman. Yet, Djirna's typical Woman embodies men's ambiguities toward their lifelong partner. A symbolic archetype, this Woman is either depicted as a mother or, on the contrary, as a witch. In the first case, her shape, rounded, conjures up the image of the egg and, ipso-facto, of fertility, found also in the way she sometimes wraps her children in an oval composition. The atmosphere is that of an idyllic, universal motherhood. But this positive image is reversed as soon as the Woman gives up her function as Mother, then, the state of balance, symbolized by motherhood and fertility, moves into a state of disorder and evil, in which the Woman is either victim or perpetrator of evil. Controlled horror prevails - and artistic mastery. This same mastery is also at work in the artist's abstract series - works of color dominated by a dialectic of green and red, the product of the emotional flux of this interesting master.

Made Budiana

Less easily accessible is Made Budiana. A master of pastels, as much as painting proper, his starting point is not so much color as "line". Figurative representation in his work is never purposely accidental. It occurs, but less as the result of intent than as an accidental consequence of a "scrabbling frenzy" to which a few additional touches give a figurative content. The purpose of this spontaneous technique is to allow for the subconscious to come up to the surface. It does so, in images usually at the border of figuration and abstraction. Indeed, here and there, there appear in his works shapes vaguely reminiscent of cultural images through which the Balinese usually express and codify their anxieties. With Djirna, above, Budiana is one of the few Balinese artists who gives room in his works to a "modernized" version of Balinese cultural archetype.

Darmika

The last artist of the show is Darmika. Darmika is part of those FEW artist who come to maturity late on, once they have undergone a sort of catharsis through which their expression, until then impeded, finds a sudden outlet. Like the painters above, Darmika belongs to the modernist Balinese tradition, that of artists hovering between figuration and abstraction, and who usually end up subtly connoting Balinese symbols through an abstract-looking color composition. All is indeed subtlety in Darmika's works. The contrasted colors, which seem to melt into one another, like opposed cosmic forces, eventually combine and blend in the great whirling of things.

These eight painters, who are among Indonesia's most famous, illustrate the encounter of modernity and tradition. Yet, all are aloof from reality. Their world is that of symbols, dreams or ethereality. The real world is absent. There lies for artists, and for the museum, the challenge of the future. (Jean Couteau)

Museum Rudana is located on Jalan Cok Rai Pudak No. 44 in Peliatan, Ubud. (Telephone ++62-(0)361-975779).

The current exhibition runs from August 16, 2007 until October 1, 2007. The Museum is open Monday through Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Sunday from 12:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m..


Indonesia: Winning the War on Terror
Time Magazine Examines Why the Indonesian Approach to Terrorism May be a Model Worth Imitating.

The on-line edition of Time Magazine carries a story by Joshua Kurlantzick paying all too infrequent homage to Indonesia's unequalled track record in the continuing war on international terrorism.

The article [See: How Indonesia is Winning Its War on Terror], chronicles recent devastating blows dealt to home-grown and imported terror cells, citing Indonesia as "one of the world's few triumphs in fighting terrorism."

Relating how police and anti-terror units have "arrested or killed some 300 alleged militants," Indonesia has also become a front-line member on the world effort to curtail money laundering and terror, earning praise from the U.S., Great Britain and Australia along the way.

Perhaps most fundamentally, Indonesia has avoided resorting to divisive and counter-productive draconian measures leaving J.I. a "much weaker" organization, according to terrorism expert Sidney Jones.

Persuasion Before Compulsion

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yodhoyono has pursued a policy of winning hearts and minds, persuading young Indonesians that extremism and radicalism have no place in Indonesian society. Leading religious figures have joined the President's public relations offensive in concert with film clips showing captured terrorists repenting their evil deeds.

Because the war on terrorism is a protracted a world-wide struggle, no Country can truly declare victory and free of its scourge. But the TIME article suggests that Indonesia may have turned the corner in dealing with terror and its perpetrators.

Related Articles

[It's a Mad Mad World - Except in Bali]

[Eenee, Meenee, Mianee, Mo! Catch a Terrorist by the Toe! ]

[Where You Gonna Run To? Bali or London?]


Bali Police Now On Line
New Web Site to Provide Information on Bali Law Enforcement.

The Bali police force are in the early days of launching a new web site [Bali Police Web Site] as part of their continuing efforts to increase operational transparency and improve their service to the public.

In its final form, the new web site will eventually allow the public to follow high-profile cases, access the Police's "most wanted" list, and obtain "real-time" images from eight "high-priority" areas across the island.

The web site is presented in Indonesian.

Commenting on the new web site, Bali's Chief of Police Inspector General Paulus Purwoko said the web site was a response to the public's demands for better public service from the police and his department's desire to use the advantages offered by modern technology. By providing direct access to the police and key areas across the island, Chief Purwoko said he hope that the public would be persuaded that Bali is indeed safe for international and domestic tourism.


Bali Bike-A-Fund 2007
It's All Downhill From Here as Rotary Club Bali Raises Funds on Sunday, August 26, 2007.

Join a 20 km mountain cycling tour from Kedewatan (near Ubud) to the Bali Bird Park on Sunday, August 26, 2007, and help raise funds to build libraries in two Seminyak primary schools.

Bali Bike-A-Fund 2007

Open to the general community as well as Rotarians, participants will gather at the Sobek office at Tirta Ening No. 9 in Sanur at 8:30 a.m. from where transfers will be provided to the starting point at Kedewatan. Designed for people who perhaps haven't ridden a bicycle for years, the trip follow relatively quiet downhill trails with frequent stops to visit temples, plantations and villages along the way.

Led by experienced guides the trip includes:

. Transport from Sanur to Kedewatan Village

. Return transfer from the Bali Bird Park to Sanur

. Drinking water and cold towels

. Customized Mountain Bikes

. A buffet lunch at the Bali Bird Park

. Free flight bird show

Cost & Registration

The normal charge for this trip offered on a daily basis by Sobek is US$68.

Participants in the special Rotary Bike-A-Fund will pay only Rp. 200,000 (approximately US$21.75), but are asked to donate an additional Rp. 300,000 (approximately US$32.60) either through direct contribution or sponsorship to support the library project.

Registration and More Information

Advance bookings before Wednesday, August 22, 2007, are needed to prepare the necessary transport, guides and catering arrangements.

Bookings and more information can be obtained via telephone at:

. Anita Lococo at +62-(0)81 238 00580

. Patrick van Kampen at +62-(0)81 138 6807.


Pastika Registers to Run for Bali's Governor
Bali's Former Police Chief Prepared to Leave Role as Top Anti-Narcotics Cop to Become Bali's Leader.

Bali's former Chief of Police, I Made Mangku Pastika, has formally thrown his hat into the ring for the coming election to choose Bali's Governor for the period 2008-2013.

The current Head of the National anti-Narcotic Board, Pastika formally registered himself as a candidate of the Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P Bali) in Bali on Thursday morning, August 9, 2007.

The Head of the Committee for Gubernatorial Candidate Registration at the PDI-P Bali, Anak Agung Gede Bagus, declared that any remaining doubts regarding Pastika's seriousness in seeking Bali's top job evaporated with the formal filing of his candidacy. To date, the only other candidate to register his candidacy with the PDI-P Bali is Professor Dr. Wayan Witha, the former Rector of Bali's Udayana University.

Pastika is legendary for his "no nonsense" approach to law enforcement and is credited for speaqrheading the investigation of the October 2002 Bali terrorist attacks and subsequent capture of the key players in that atrocity.

Time Magazine named Pastika is Asian Newsmaker of the Year following the arrest of the Bali Bombers.

Related Story [Mangku Pastika - Bali's Next Governor?]


St. Regis Comes to Bali
Luxury US$80 Million Nusa Dua Property to Focus Exclusively on Suite, Villas and Residences.

The luxury St. Regis Resort & Residence brand will open an 81 hotel suite, 41 villa and 14 private residence property within the Nusa Dua Complex in July of 2008.

Owned by the PT Rajawali Corporation, who also own the 271-room Laguna Resort & Spa, the new development is set on an 8.8 hectare lot leased from the Bali Tourism Development Corporation (BTDC).

The Resort, with an investment value of US$80 million, is owned by Indonesian businessman Peter Sondakh.

According to Edward Hotter, CEO for Hotel Operations at PT Rajawali, the new development is being built by Ground Kent Architects of Australia together with Bensley Design Studio from the Philippines.

Situated on a plot with direct access to the Bali Golf & Country Club, the published room rates will range from US$400 to US$3,000 per night.

Suites and residences will be available for sale with post-purchase rental management provided by St. Regis Resorts & Residences. Sales prices for the villas will start at US$700,000 and from US$1.2 million for the private residences. Press reports state that some of the top-end residences priced at US$2.2 million have already been sold.

Purchaser-investors have been promised a guaranteed 7% return on investment for the first three years and 40% of room rentals in the years thereafter.

St. Regis is a luxury brand of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide currently operating 12 properties world-wide, with 9 new properties - including Bali, now under development.


We Felt the Earth Move
Indonesia Suffers Little Damage from Massive 7.5 Earthquake. Bali Shaken, But Not Stirred.

A massive earthquake measuring 7.5 on the Richter scale struck 100 km east of Jakarta deep in the Java sea, shortly after 11:00 p.m. Bali time on Wednesday, August 8, 2007. Fortunately, because the quake's epicenter stood at a depth of 289 kilometers below the earth's surface, no tsunami resulted from the quake.

However, Buildings did sway in Jakarta and the quake was felt 900 kilometers away in Bali. But, with the exception of a single heart attack fatality linked to the earthquake in West Java, no major significant damage or casualties were directly attributed to the seismic event.

Approximately 12 earthquakes with an greater than 7 are recorded each year around the world.

The Boxing Day earthquake of December 2004 cost more than 500,000 lives while a July 2006 earthquake off Java's south cost resulted in the deaths of more than 6,000.


 
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Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
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Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
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Bali Update #542
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Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
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Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
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Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
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Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
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Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
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Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
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Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
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Bali Update #500
April 10, 2006

Bali Update #499
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Bali Update #498
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Bali Update #497
March 20, 2006

Bali Update #496
March 13, 2006

Bali Update #495
March 06, 2006

Bali Update #494
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Bali Update #493
February 20, 2006

Bali Update #492
February 13, 2006

Bali Update #491
February 06, 2006

Bali Update #490
January 30, 2006

Bali Update #489
January 23, 2006

Bali Update #488
January 16, 2006

Bali Update #487
January 09, 2006

Bali Update #486
January 02, 2006

Bali Update #485
December 26, 2005

Bali Update #484
December 19, 2005

Bali Update #482
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Bali Update #481
December 05, 2005

Bali Update #481
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Bali Update #480
November 21, 2005

Bali Update #479
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Bali Update #478
November 07, 2005

Bali Update #477
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Bali Update #476
October 24, 2005

Bali Update #475
October 17, 2005

Bali Update #474
October 10, 2005

Bali Update #473
October 03, 2005

Bali Update #472
September 26, 2005

Bali Update #471
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Bali Update #470
September 12, 2005

Bali Update #469
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Bali Update #468
August 29, 2005

Bali Update #467
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Bali Update #466
August 15, 2005

Bali Update #465
August 08, 2005

Bali Update #464
August 01, 2005

Bali Update #463
July 25, 2005

Bali Update #462
July 18, 2005

Bali Update #461
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Bali Update #460
July 04, 2005

Bali Update #459
June 27, 2005

Bali Update #458
June 20, 2005

Bali Update #457
June 13, 2005

Bali Update #456
June 06, 2005

Bali Update #455
May 30, 2005

Bali Update #454
May 23, 2005

Bali Update #453
May 16, 2005

Bali Update #452
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Bali Update #451
May 02, 2005

Bali Update #450
April 25, 2005

Bali Update #449
April 18, 2005

Bali Update #448
April 11, 2005

Bali Update #447
April 04, 2005

Bali Update #446
March 28, 2005

Bali Update #445
March 21, 2005

Bali Update #444
March 14, 2005

Bali Update #443
March 07, 2005

Bali Update #442
February 28, 2005

Bali Update #441
February 21, 2005

Bali Update #440
February 14, 2005

Bali Update #439
February 07, 2005

Bali Update #438
January 31, 2005

Bali Update #437
January 24, 2005

Bali Update #436
January 17, 2005

Bali Update #435
January 10, 2005

Bali Update #434
January 03, 2005

Bali Update #433
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Bali Update #432
December 20, 2004

Bali Update #431
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Bali Update #430
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Bali Update #429
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Bali Update #428
November 22, 2004

Bali Update #427
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Bali Update #426
November 08, 2004

Bali Update #425
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Bali Update #424
October 25, 2004

Bali Update #423
October 18, 2004

Bali Update #422
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Bali Update #421
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Bali Update #420
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Bali Update #419
September 20, 2004

Bali Update #418
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Bali Update #417
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Bali Update #416
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Bali Update #415
August 23, 2004

Bali Update #414
August 16, 2004

Bali Update #413
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Bali Update #412
August 02, 2004

Bali Update #411
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Bali Update #410
July 19, 2004

Bali Update #409
July 12, 2004

Bali Update #408
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Bali Update #407
June 28, 2004

Bali Update #406
June 21, 2004

Bali Update #405
June 14, 2004

Bali Update #404
June 07, 2004

Bali Update #403
May 31, 2004

Bali Update #402
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Bali Update #401
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Bali Update #400
May 10, 2004

Bali Update #399
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Bali Update #398
April 26, 2004

Bali Update #397
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Bali Update #396
April 12, 2004

Bali Update #395
April 05, 2004

Bali Update #394
March 29, 2004

Bali Update #393
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Bali Update #392
March 15, 2004

Bali Update #391
March 08, 2004

Bali Update #390
March 01, 2004

Bali Update #389
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Bali Update #388
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Bali Update #387
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Bali Update #386
February 02, 2004

Bali Update #385
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Bali Update #384
January 19, 2004

Bali Update #383
January 12, 2004

Bali Update #382
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Bali Update #381
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Bali Update #380
December 22, 2003

Bali Update #379
December 15, 2003

Bali Update #378
December 08, 2003

Bali Update #377
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Bali Update #376
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Bali Update #375
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Bali Update #374
November 10, 2003

Bali Update #373
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Bali Update #372
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Bali Update #371
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Bali Update #370
October 13, 2003

Bali Update #369
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Bali Update #368
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Bali Update #367
September 22, 2003

Bali Update #366
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Bali Update #365
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Bali Update #364
September 01, 2003

Bali Update #363
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Bali Update #362
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Bali Update #361
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Bali Update #360
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Bali Update #359
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Bali Update #358
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Bali Update #357
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Bali Update #356
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Bali Update #355
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Bali Update #354
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Bali Update #353
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Bali Update #352
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Bali Update #351
June 02, 2003

Bali Update #350
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Bali Update #349
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Bali Update #348
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Bali Update #347
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Bali Update #346
April 28, 2003

Bali Update #345
April 21, 2003

Bali Update #344
April 14, 2003

Bali Update #343
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Bali Update #342
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Bali Update #341
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Bali Update #340
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Bali Update #339
March 17, 2003

Bali Update #338
March 10, 2003

Bali Update #337
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Bali Update #336
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Bali Update #335
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Bali Update #334
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Bali Update #333
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Bali Update #332
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Bali Update #331
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Bali Update #330
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Bali Update #329
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Bali Update #328
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Bali Update #327
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Bali Update #326
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Bali Update #325
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Bali Update #324
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Bali Update #323
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Bali Update #322
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Bali Update #321
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Bali Update #320
November 04, 2002

Bali Update #319
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Bali Update #318
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Bali Update #317
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Bali Update #316
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Bali Update #315
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Bali Update #314
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Bali Update #313
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Bali Update #312
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Bali Update #311
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Bali Update #310
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Bali Update #309
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Bali Update #308
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Bali Update #307
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Bali Update #306
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Bali Update #305
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Bali Update #304
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Bali Update #303
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Bali Update #302
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Bali Update #301
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Bali Update #300
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Bali Update #299
June 10, 2002

Bali Update #298
June 03, 2002

Bali Update #297
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Bali Update #296
May 20, 2002

Bali Update #295
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Bali Update #294
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Bali Update #293
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Bali Update #292
April 22, 2002

Bali Update #291
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Bali Update #290
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Bali Update #289
April 01, 2002

Bali Update #288
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Bali Update #287
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Bali Update #286
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Bali Update #285
March 04, 2002

Bali Update #284
February 25, 2002

Bali Update #283
February 18, 2002

Bali Update #282
February 11, 2002

Bali Update #281
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Bali Update #280
January 28, 2002

Bali Update #279
January 21, 2002

Bali Update #278
January 14, 2002

Bali Update #277
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Bali Update #276
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Bali Update #275
December 24, 2001

Bali Update #274
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Bali Update #273
December 10, 2001

Bali Update #272
December 03, 2001

Bali Update #271
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Bali Update #270
November 19, 2001

Bali Update #269
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Bali Update #268
November 05, 2001

Bali Update #267
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Bali Update #266
October 22, 2001

Bali Update #265
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Bali Update #264
October 08, 2001

Bali Update #263
October 01, 2001

Bali Update #262
September 24, 2001

Bali Update #261
September 17, 2001

Bali Update #260
September 10, 2001

Bali Update #259
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Bali Update #258
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Bali Update #257
August 20, 2001

Bali Update #256
August 13, 2001

Bali Update #255
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Bali Update #254
July 30, 2001
 

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