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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #580 - 22 October 2007

Population Pressures in Bali

Bali’s Planning Experts say Population Density is 50% Higher than Ideal Levels.


The Bali Post reports that Bali is becoming increasingly over-populated. While experts estimate the ideal carrying capacity for Bali's 562,286 hectares of land area is 2.4 million, a number far below the more than 3 million people who now make their home on the Island.

The Regional Planning Board for Bali (BAPPEDA), Drs. Made Adijaya revealed that the current average of 600 people per square kilometer in Bali is 50% more than the ideal number of 400 residents per square kilometer. In municipal areas, such as Bali's capital of Denpasar, population loads are estimated to equal a very crowded 800 people per square kilometer.

In reaction to this data, the Chairman of Committee I of the Regional House of Representatives in Bali (DPRD-BALI), Made Arjaya, said now is the time to limit migration into Bali, prohibiting Indonesian nationals who do not hold an official Bali identity card from staying or seeking employment on the Island. Arjaya also called on Bali land and long-term rental accommodation owners to gather complete personal details and proof of Bali residency before leasing their lands and buildings to newcomers.


Keeping Bali's Vehicles on the Level

Government Officials Explain Why Overpasses, Suspended Highways and Monorails Won't Work in Bali


The Deputy Coordinating Economic Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, Dr. Ir. Bambang Susantono, told a national conference on transportation meeting in Bali on October 18, 2007, that building overpasses and elevated roadways in Bali was not a viable means of overcoming traffic congestion problems on the island. Susantono, who is also the Chairman of the Indonesian Transportation Community (TPI), told the meeting that social and cultural beliefs held by the majority of Bali's residents make overpasses an inappropriate means of addressing traffic issues.

Saying he did not agree with building overpasses in Bali, Susantono told the Bali Post said a more practical solution would be to upgrade the present road system and build underpasses, rather than building elevated roadways which unacceptably pass over and above the heads of the local Bali-Hindu populations, their communities and places of worship.

No Easy Solutions

Susantono warned his audience that there are no road-building solutions that will satisfactorily resolve Bali's growing traffic problems. To do this, he insisted, Bali must build a mass transit system that is safe, comfortable, affordable, and operates on a fixed and convenient schedule.

Such a mass transit system would have to be constructed so it could serve both local residents and tourist visitors to Bali.

Speaking to the conference, Susantono explained that he does not accept the popular perception that mass transit is incompatible with Balinese society, insisting a well-planned and affordable public transport system would earn the patronage of the people of Bali.

At the same conference in Kuta, Indonesia's Minister of Culture and Tourism, Jero Wacik echoed Susantono's sentiments saying that better roads are needed in Bali while discounting the appropriateness of suspended highways and monorail systems for the Island of Bali.

No One Knows What Goes on Behind Closed Walls

Bali's Governor Says Kintamani's Panoramic Views are Being Lost to Unregulated Building.

Bali’s Governor Drs. Dewa Made Beratha has called for a stop to illegal and unplanned development in the areas surrounding Kintamani's volcanic lake district.

Dismayed at the rapid growth of restaurants, shops and accommodation providers around the crater-lake's edge, the Governor warned, "if this (unplanned and illegal building) is not stopped, don’t hope for tourists to continue visiting Kintamani."

Beratha also warned that if businesses are allowed to continue to build structures and concrete walls the scenic views of nature and Lake Batur will be lost. "if visitors can no longer see nature's beauty, what's left for them to do at Kintamani?"" the Governor asked.

Governor Beratha told BisnisBali that many of the building dotting the roadside at Kintamani were illegally constructed. Calling for a halt on future illegal construction which is destroying Kintamani's natural beauty, Beratha said that Bali was in danger of losing one of the world's truly unique tourism objects.

When asked by reporters if his office had plans to introduce enforcement measures against the owners of unlicensed buildings at Kintamani, the Governor said it was the right and responsibility of the Regional government of Bangli to take knock down the illegal structures.

When contacted by BisnisBali, regional government official in Bangli said enforcement measures were difficult to coordinate with the Provincial Government with no one able to even agree on an acceptable deadline for the removal of the unlicensed buildings. Because of economic considerations, many of the illegal buildings at Kintamani have been given 10-15 year deadlines to operate before facing a final removal deadline.

 

Uncertain 'Welcome Back' Awaits Bali's Migrant Population

Authorities Tighten Control at Ferry Crossings and Conduct Identity Checks in Bali Neighborhoods to Control Domestic Migrants.


An estimated 100,000 common laborers have begun traveling to Bali following Lebaran celebrations in Java and other areas of Indonesia.

Among those traveling by bus, motorcycle and on foot crossing on the ferry from Ketapang (Java) to Gilimanuk (Bali) will be many first-time travelers to Bali, accompanying friends and relatives back to Bali in search of employment and better fortunes.

To help stem the human swell, Bali officials staffing the entry point to Bali are requiring all arriving passengers to show an ID card issued in Bali and demonstrate that they are gainfully employed on Bali.

According to the man in charge of population and civil registration in North Bali, I Gusti Ngurah Sudirama, travelers unable to present the required identification and prove an economic link to Bali will be placed back on the ferry bound for Java.

Inspections are being conducted at Bali's gateways as well as on a neighborhood level in communities across the Island. Inspections carried out in Kuta on Thursday, October 18, 2007, netted 260 undocumented residents who were hit with administrative sanctions and required to present a guarantor or face possible expulsion from the island.



Continuing Struggle Between the Sacred and the Profane in Bali

Demolishment of Two Balinese Temples in Sanur Makes Front Page News in Bali and Local Villagers Very Angry.


Local villagers and community leaders in Sanur's Mertasari beach area are reportedly offended and angered by the actions of property developer who demolished two religious temples, supposedly to make way for a new resort project.

The land, registered to PT Restu Maharani was occupied by the investor on August 16, 2006 as part of a court-ordered seizure following a lengthy civil court action.

Local community and religious leaders complained that the demolishment of Pura Ketapang and Pura Sembyangan took place on October 1, 2007 while people of the surrounding village were busy attending a local cremation ceremony.

The temples destroyed by the developer form an important part of the religious life of the surrounding community, serving as the location for specific ceremonies on the local religious calendar.

While community leaders admit an approach from the developer asking permission to demolish the temples had been made, they insist that no permission to carry out the "knock-down" was ever granted because of fears that such an act would be unacceptable to local residents.

In order to preserve cosmic balance and avoid natural and personal disasters that might befall those who ignore their religious obligations, Balinese temples are the site of numerous ceremonies with strict rules in place for their care and maintenance.

Whenever necessity dictates that a temple or pura must be built, demolished or moved - a number of carefully scripted ceremonies are mandated.

Developers claim that ceremonies were performed prior to demolishing the two temples, an argument rejected by the local community who question the completeness and adherence to ritual stricture of the ceremonies conducted by the owners.

The development site measuring 60,000 square meters was the object of a legal battle between the Denpasar Mayor's office who granted the permit to PT Restu Maharani and a man claiming to be the true owner of the land. In August 2006 the local courts ruled in favor of the Mayor and the developer allowing the company to take charge of the property and proceed with the resort project.

Power to the People

State Power Board Says Bali Power Grid is Under Severe Strain.


Bali is facing a growing threat of severe power shortages following the loss of 130 megawatts from the Bali power grid.

Wayan Redika, a spokesman for the Bali State Power Board (PLN-Bali) said the power shortage dates from September 2, 2007, when repairs were carried out the East Java Gilimanuk Power Station.

The spokesman estimates that the current Bali power grid can only supply 430 megawatts of electricity against an estimated peak consumption requirement of 439 megawatts.

The bulk of Bali's power supply is provided via submarine cables connecting the island to various power production plants on Java.

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An Ersatz Paradise – Hawaiian Villas for Sale in Bali

Editorial: Is Anyone Keeping a Watchful Eye on Sustaining Bali's Cultural Heritage?

Two press reports in local papers recently caught our attention; fueling latent fears that something is seriously wrong with the management of Bali's tourism product.

The first article related how, while opening a cultural festival in Nusa Dua, Indonesia's Minister of Culture and Tourism ordered Bali's Governor to urgently copyright all traditional forms of Balinese art to prevent the Island's cultural identity from being "stolen" by neighboring countries. Possibly prompted by a recent dispute between Indonesia and Malaysia over who truly owns a popular children's song warbled by the children of both countries, Minister Jero Wacik wishes reflects his desire to preserve Indonesia's rich heritage by bringing cultural pretenders to answer before the Courts.

The second, and at least to us - related, article announced the launch of five "Hawaiian luxury villas" by Kamuela Villas in the Seminyak area of Bali.

Book Em, Dano

Intrigued and more than a little confused, we resolved to find out what actually constitutes Hawaiian style branding in Bali. The Company's press release revealed that the new Hawaiian villas will offer an Ohana spirit or Hawaiian family-style atmosphere because, in the words of the Company's Executive Commissioner, "Hawaiian people are known for their friendliness and genuine warmth similar to the Indonesian people."

What a wonderful comfort this will be to Bali visitors to know that they can come to Bali confident in the knowledge that they will encounter friendly Indonesian villa staff trained to act just like friendly Hawaiian villa staff.

Bringing Coals to Newcastle?

While we have no desire to rain on anyone's luau, we feel can't help but ask what possesses investors to recreate a "Hawaiian atmosphere" on Bali – an island voted time and again by Travel + Leisure Magazine as the world's best holiday destination? Or, perhaps more to the point, what motivates Bali's leaders to so readily ransom to investors the very reputation which has made the Island one of the world's most popular tourist destinations?

Pray, tell us, has Hawaii run so low on land or local charms that it must re-invent itself in far away places like Bali? Or, alternatively, has Bali's branding become so diluted that it needs to bolster its tourism fortunes with ukuleles, grass skirts and Don Ho style dinner shows?

Pardon the poor confused tourist sitting on a Bali beach, feeling he has somehow been cast in the wrong motion picture . . . "Please, Nyoman, pass some more poi."

Bapak Mantra, We Miss You!

Gone forever, it seems, are the days when the late and very popular Governor Ida Bagus Mantra stood jealous guard over Bali's culture, requiring tourism investors to only erect Balinese-style buildings, reverently maintain Balinese temples on their premises and dress their staffs in traditional Balinese costumes.

There will be those who discount our concerns, insisting Bali is unfolding exactly as it should and, in any case, it's not the concern of non-Balinese "outsiders" to try to arbitrate the nature of Bali's future cultural complexion.

And, to be sure, such arguments are not wrong. Only the Balinese own the local beachhead; and, only the Balinese can decide when to draw a line in the sand, declaring "enough is enough" in the slippery slide to cultural marginalization.

You Don't Know What You've Lost 'Till it's Gone

In a week that heralded the arrival of "Hawaiian-style" villas in Bali and saw a developer knock down two Balinese temples to make way for a resort development, any talk about the need to preserve and protect Bali's endemic culture may be purely academic; a matter of "too little, too late."

With due respect to Minister Wacik, who is himself a son of Bali, the battle to sustain Bali's culture is not located in some Patent Attorney's office; but much closer at hand, raging right now on the island of his birth.

Bali's future path is increasingly uncertain, especially in light of the laisez faire pay-as-you-go attitude that governs tourism development on the Island.

By the way, can we ask a final small favor before you go?

Would the last person to leave the island of Bali please remember to turn off the lights?

You'll find the switch located under the sign at the airport that reads:

"Aloha 'oe – You're Leaving Bali"

 

Ms. Downer from Down Under Visits Ubud School Project

Nicky Downer AO, Wife of Australia's Foreign Minister, Pays a Visit to Bali Hati School in Ubud, Bali.

Nicky Downer, the wife of the Australian Foreign Minister Alexander Downer, recently visited the Yayasan Bali Hati Primary School in Mas, Ubud. The school is part of the non-profit Bali Hati Foundation which provides a variety of health, educational and social welfare assistance to disadvantaged people in Bali.

The Yayasan Bali Hati Primary School was established in 1999 and is located in the village of Mas, close to the Township of Ubud. The school is open to children from playgroup to 6th grade, with scholarships provided to financially disadvantaged students. Since the school's inception, more than 1,100 scholarships have been granted and the school has recently been recognized as the best primary school in Bali by the Government.

Nicky Downer Picture

Downer, who visited the school in early October while attending the Ubud's Readers and Writer Festival said: "During my visit to the Yayasan Bali Hati School in Ubud, I was immediately impressed by such a well run operation, with bright airy classrooms and excellent teachers. The children, from around the Ubud area, were extremely well-behaved and I observed were being taught to at an extraordinarily high level for their age. One of the most lovely things I noted, was a collection of brightly colored models of different places of worship made by the children, who are taught something of the many religions of the world. Upon leaving Yayasan Bali Haiti School, I was inspired and filled with admiration of the positive work that the Bali Hati Foundation and it's generous supporters are gifting to the children of Bali."

The Yayasan Bali Hati School has plans to expand to a new property which will incorporate a high school. Fund raising activities are currently in place to secure the capital costs of the program.


Related Sites and Article

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Dead Men Walking

Attorney General Moves to Hasten the Final Execution of the 3 Bali Bombers.

Officials legal steps are underway to close a legal loophole and hasten the final execution of the three Bali bombers – Amrozi, Iman Samudra and Ali Gufron now sitting on death row.

Having exhausted all legal appeals, the three's final hope of escaping death before a firing squad is a grant of commutation from President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. With the three terrorists indicating they will not file a request for mercy with Indonesia's President, jurists are admitting some confusion on how to proceed, saying execution cannot take place without clemency being formally requested and denied.


To overcome this impasse Indonesia's Attorney General Hendarman Supandji has announced that he will give the three convicts 30 days to file a request with the President's office. In the absence of a formal request, the long-awaited execution will go ahead.

The three are currently being held on death row at Indonesia's penal island of Nusa Kumbangan where it is widely expected the final execution will be carried out.

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Bike to Work – Bike to Bali

President to Dispatch Group of Bicyclists in Jakarta November 11th to Travel to Bali to attend the U.N. Conference on Global Climate Change.

Indonesia’s President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono will send off a group of 15 cyclists on a 20-day cross-nation trip from Jakarta to Bali on November 11, 2007.

Designed to underline Indonesia's support for the coming United Nations Forum on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to be held in Bali December 3-14, 2007, the bicyclists will travel 1,433 kilometers covering an average 72 kilometers each day as the group visits 40 cities along the route.

In support of the cyclists the government will provide accommodation and other assistance along the entire route, including organizing tree plantings and activities to promote the popularity of cycling as an alternative to fossil-fueled vehicles as a means of transportation.

The Bike to Work (B2W) movement in Indonesia has 7,000 registered members, with 4,000 members in Jakarta alone.

The cross-country cyclists are expected to arrive in Bali on November 30 at which time they will hoist the U.N. flag to welcome the more than 10,000 participants expected to come to the island to participate in the UNFCCC.


Related Story
Climate Change Conference to cost US$12 Million
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Spiritual Tourism for Bali

Minister Wacik Sees Strong Future for Spiritual Tourism in Bali.

Republika On-Line reports that the Minister of Culture and Tourism, Jero Wacik has identified spiritual tourism as a key product for Bali's future.

According to the Minister, "a source for tourism in Bali for the future is spiritual tourism because of the potentials and possibilities offered in the cities and regions in Bali."

Speaking before a conference on "Major Trends – Opportunities and Investments in Tourism," Wacik said the main market sources for spiritual tourism are from Japan, Europe and the United States. "Tourist coming from these countries have become bored with crowded tourist attractions and are now seeking 'quieter' tourism, such as places for mediation and reflections upon their Creator," he explained.

The Minister said that all locations in Bali have potential for spiritual tourism together with other destinations in Indonesia, such as Tanah Toraja in Sulawesi and Central Java. Wacik emphasized that in addition to the physical location for this form of tourism, it is also essential to have staff trained in meditative practice and yoga.

Commenting separately, Bali's Chief of Tourism, Drs. I Gede Nurjaya, said that the Balinese have a close connection with nature and an all pervading sense of spirituality. The leading government official in charge of Bali's tourism said that the Balinese see nature in a religious context and have a wide range of ritual practice honoring nature. Because of this, said Nurjaya, Bali is the proper choice of location for the development of spiritual tourism.

 

 

 

 




 
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