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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #602- 24 March 2008

Al Purwa Calls for Action to Stop Gypsy Transport
Tour Association Chairman Complains that Frequent Complaints to Government Continue to be Ignored.

The Indonesian Association of Tour and Travel Agents (ASITA) is complaining about the lack of official action against Bali's huge fleet of illegal "gypsy" taxis operating tours and transfers across the island.

Al Purwa, the Chairman of ASITA-Bali, was quoted by BisnisBali as stating that despite frequent complaints to the Bali Tourism Authority, no official action has been taken to curve illegal transport operators in Bali.

According to Purwa, the Tourism Authority and the Police should take action based on the complaints filed by Bali's licensed tourism operators. Purwa added that the "black number plates" or illegal taxis continue to cause losses to the law-abiding members of ASITA who follow transport rules and pay taxes.

Explained Purwa: "Not only do these illegal taxis operating without licenses cause losses to licensed travel agencies, but also to the tourists who use their services. When there is an accident or some other incident, the tourists who are passengers in these vehicles receive no insurance compensation from the illegal transportation operators."

Purwa said that he hopes the government will soon take appropriate action to close down the illegal transport operators and protect the tax revenues Bali derives from licensed operators.

"If the current situation is allowed to continue," said Purwa, "Bali's image as a tourism destination will be damaged, such as in the past when tourists have been criminally attacked while riding in illegal local transport."

Some local tourism observers have suggested that spontaneous and unscheduled "razia" or "police roadblocks" introduced on main roads in Bali manned by police, tourism officials and volunteers from ASITA would soon put an end to illegal taxi operations. Illegal transport found with tourist passengers on board would be stopped and its passengers required to transfer to waiting metered taxis to either continue their tour or return to their hotels. Such steps, while seen as drastic by some, would almost instantaneously destroy any appeal of using unlicensed vehicles.


Do You Want Me to Draw You a Picture?
Bali Opens Southeast Asia’s First Cartoon Museum in Kuta.

The Museum Kartun Indonesia or Indonesian Cartoon Museum has opened at Sunset Road No.85 in Kuta. The Museum, which was formally opened on March 13, 2008, is the first facility of its kind in Southeast Asia.

At the museum over 600 works of art by Indonesia's leading cartoonists and caricaturists are now on display.

Established by the Association of Indonesian Cartoonists (PAKARTI) will display works taken from the pages of Indonesian newspapers and magazines, featuring such well-know artists as Sidharta, Dwi Koen, Poernomo, and Kokang.

One of the founders of the Museum, 85-year-old Adi Jangkrik, said at the opening: 'We hope this museum is able to become a motivator for our cartoonists, preventing them from becoming pessimists. Let's create not only for ourselves but also for all the people."


Asia Pacific Media Forum Returns to Bali
For Third Consecutive Year Media Leaders Will Gather in Bali June 4-7, 2008.

Three years charmed. The Asian Pacific Media Forum 2008 (APMF 2008) will invite leading voices in world media to gather in Bali to exchange views and discuss the challenges of "The New Avatar of Media" with a view to transform.

Among those slated to appear:

• Tony Fernandez, Group CEO AirAsia who will discuss the success of AirAsia in reshaping the airline industry, under the topic of "Transforming the Way People Fly."

• Gavin Mehrotra, International Media Director, The Coca-Cola Company.

• Vishnu Mohan, Asia Pacific CEO, MPG.

• Tim Balbirnie, CEO South Asia, Synovate.

• Prashun Dutt, Director-Consultant: Marketing, Strategy & Communications for UTUSAN Newspapers and Magazines and The Sun (Nexnews)

• Ian Stewart, Senior VP, MTV Networks Asia.

• Debby Sadrach, Home & Personal Care Director, Unilever Indonesia.

• Barney Loehnis, Asia Pacific Director, Isobar.

• Mark Holden, Managing Director, PHD Australia.
<APMF will be held at the Bali International Convention Center (BICC), Nusa Dua, Bali June 4-7, 2008.



Bali's Need for Comprehensive Planning and Action
Stephen McMahon, a Western Australian Financial Planner and Frequent Visitor to Bali Outlines His Ideas on What Must Be Done to Make Bali Sustainable.

Balidiscovery.com coverage on desires by Bali officials to impose an additional charge on visiting tourist [See: Bali Seeking More Airport Fees from Visiting Tourists] prompted a thoughtful response from a Bali Update readers who spreads his time between Bali and Perth, Western Australia.

Stephen McMahon is a licensed property valuer and financial planner with over 40 years of experience in Australia and Southeast Asia that includes 20 years of regular visits to Bali. Along the way, he has developed a strong interest in the areas of heritage, environmental issues, planning and service infrastructure.

Opinion – Stephen McMahon

Here's what Stephen wrote Bali Update to say:

”Thanks for your recent article on this issue.

As a regular visitor to Bali over many years and as an experienced developer and professional consultant, I would like to contribute to this debate.

Firstly, let's recognize that many of the environmental issues and poor infrastructure (in Bali) are a result of many years of neglect and that neglect has been generated by the lack of funding not desire.

It does not serve Bali or any of its representatives, publicly disputing issues of raising funds from tourist on any basis.

Bali is in desperate need of a long term solution and short term action to address serious environment and infrastructure issues and must, over the next few years, take some real progressive decisions.

The main issues facing this Island is not increasing tourism and economic investment but catering for the demand of it and the expansion of its local population that is both sustainable and one which considers long term impact and benefit.

To summarize, some of the main issues and challenges are clearly:

• Rubbish and waste disposal.

• Tip site clean ups.

• Drainage - particularly in commercial areas.

• Sewerage treatment and reticulation planning and implementation.

• Power supplies.

• Road maintenance and traffic regulation.

• Provision of water supply to regional and village environments.

• Health matters in respect to local inhabitants and facilities that cater for local people.

These are in the main, public works that would not only clean the island and protect its environment but also provide much needed training and employment - a possible resolution for increasing street gangs and violent youth, born out of boredom and increasing breakdown of social values that also threaten the island's economy as much as environmental destruction.

Additional airport fees (imposed) on a tourist is a Band-Aid solution and would seen as a penalty for visiting the island, whether on arrival ,or worse, on departure when tourist have little left.

Despite popular local belief that all tourist are rich, the majority of tourist are basic family units and such cost are multiple for a family and impact on holiday decision making.

The fact that there is already political challenge as to charging the fee on a State-owned enterprise, raises the obvious (conclusion) that it won't happen and Bali cannot wait for too many more years to address these issues before tourism is seriously damaged by health, social and environment issues.

Of the many issues facing Bali, there is probably none less (pressing) than the silent but continuing stream of migration from Java, without limitation, that further tax the island's already antiquated infra-structure.

Electricity supply is (another) point in case where the whole Grid system is incapable of regulated supply, yet the demands placed upon it by just local migration is a rapid recipe for disaster.

Bali host worldwide seminars for all manner of things including policing in the region, environmental issues affecting the globe, carbon emissions reduction, economic reform in Indonesia and so on - and they are all well presented and are applauded but it is time that Bali became a little more self-indulgent and invested in its own think tank on the means to raise capital and how to direct it for social reform for its people and the replacement, renewal and upgrading of infrastructure to protect this island's culture, tourist industry and environment for the next 100 years.

It is no longer acceptable to keep cleaning and repairing hand-dug rockwork drains that are choked with refuge and disease beds in themselves, to allow even a greater volume of pollutants and raw sewerage to poison the oceans that surround Bali.

It is no longer acceptable for concentrated large commercial developments and tourist hotels to install septic waste disposal systems in an already and tragic toxic water table in the main Kuta area and that of Denpasar.

It is no longer acceptable for the way rubbish is collected and disposed of in sensitive mangrove areas or nearby residential areas that breed disease.

It is no longer acceptable for the children of Bali to suffer from sores from the lack of clean water and is also not acceptable that the Balinese people have to compete for health care cost, not designed for their affordability.

The issue is as always funding, but the solution is in the resolution of obtaining it, not in the dispute of a one source solution from a target sector.

If I could be so bold, a Rp 10,000 fee on departures would most likely end up dissipated by overheads and charges of some description and the capital raised would not get anywhere near the funds needed to resolve some or any of these issues.

Local politicians may be better placed to argue the case for Bali in Jakarta as a sustainable tourist destination of Regional and, indeed, world significance. And, if the Central Government wishes to maintain the cash flow that it takes annually (from Bali), then it must re-invest in this island and that may even take the form of providing a one-for-one matching rupiah raised by Bali for Infrastructure and social reform investment.

At the end of the day, the redevelopment of this island to protect itself and its future should be the responsibility of the whole of Bali and whilst tourism can and, by the way, does support this island in many other ways than just tourism spending, they are not the solution to all manner of things. It is a future disaster for the Balinese at any level to think in those terms.

Capital raising needs structure and it can come from not only tourist but local inhabitants that can afford to contribute as well as business both domiciled in Bali and those company's and businesses that are based outside of the island but that enjoy its rewards."


Dinner with Friends at Ubud's Amandari April 5, 2008
Your Invited to Chef Moran Lonegran's Italian 'Dinner Amicale' for Friends in Ubud.

In its continuing series of Dinners Amicale featuring outstanding cuisine at affordable prices, Bali's famous Amandari Resort in Ubud will be hosting an intimate dinner of 20-35 "friends" on April 5, 2008.

The Italian Dinner

Prepared by talented New Zealand chef, Morgan Lonegran, "The Italian Dinner" reflects Morgan's philosophy on food: keep it fresh, honest, simple, and local, and let the integrity of an ingredient remain and speak for itself, highlighting and exemplifying the natural flavors of the stunning food available in Bali.

While some may question the credentials of an Italian-themed dinner prepared by a New Zealander, to do so would be to deny a family legacy bequeathed by growing up in a household of accomplished cooks who cherished the slow cooking and braising methods of the Italian cucina.

Embarking on his cooking career at the tender age of 16, he left the family home to pursue an apprenticeship at a series of well known restaurants working with leading chefs. At 23, he became chef de cuisine of a well known resort in the Marlborough Sounds, and, later, consulted several opening teams at various new restaurants before participating in NZ's Hell's Kitchen television series, competing and eventually placing second nation-wide.

Flush with success, he bought a 50% share in his first restaurant, Bella, an Italian-styled and European-influenced restaurant which grew to become a well-reviewed and much-respected dining venue in Auckland. That restaurant was voted the best local Italian eatery and saw Morgan nominated for most innovative chef in New Zealand, at the same time gaining kudos for his charity work.

A desire to see new places and experience new cuisines, Morgan has now left New Zealand with his wife and two children to join the Aman Group at its legendary Ubud property.

Dinner with Friends – The Menu - April 5, 2008

The Italian Dinner

SICILY

RAVIOLI DI GAMBERONI CON POMODORO

Sauteed prawns in garlic with tomato with caper ravioli

CALABRIA

CANNELLONI DI CONIGLIO CALABRESE

Cannelloni with spicy tomato and rabbit ragu, extra virgin olive oil and parmesan

TUSCANY

AGNELLO ALLA FIORENTINA CON FINNOCHI GRATINATI

Florentine roast lamb cutlet with gratin of Florence fennel

PIEMONTE

MONTE BIANCO

Flourless chocolate cake, chocolate meringue and chestnut cream



Cost: The cost of the dinner is Rp. 425,000 (US$46) per person plus 21% tax and service. A vegetarian Italian menu is available and dinners are welcome to bring their own wines without corkage charge.

Date: Saturday, April 5, 2008.

Reservations: By telephone to ++62-(0)361-975333 or using the email link provided.



Swiss Grand Bali Becomes The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua
New Name With a Continuing Tradition of Value and Service at Nusa Dua.

Following a change of management, the 63-room Swiss Grand Bali is now operating as The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua.

No longer a part of the Swiss-Belhotel International Chain the hotel within the Nusa Dua Complex will continue to serve as a relaxing haven offering luxury at affordable prices. Nestled within landscaped gardens filled with indigenous flora, The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua aims to promote healthy lifestyle concepts with eco-friendly tourism.

The hotel's new logo appropriately features a single leaf in a vibrant shade of green.

Showcasing elements of local tradition, The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua offers guests an intimate travel experience coupled with personalized hospitality that anticipates every conceivable need. Guest services include a nurturing spa centre that has been inspired by the timeless healing and beauty rituals of the island. A restaurant facility orientated towards the garden and pool area serves a menu of Asian and international cuisine.

The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua neighbors an 18-hole championship golf course and is in close proximity to the white sands of Nusa Dua beach. An exclusive shopping complex is also located within the enclave and features an array of boutiques, souvenir outlets, cafes and a branded department store.

The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua’s Director of Sales, Farida N Suwarko, comments, "the name change is in line with our new vision and mission to create a healthy green environment for guests with a friendly ambience and excellent service that will provide memories to last a lifetime. The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua is an intimate property where guests will want to return again and again."

The property features large 85-square meter bedrooms and living areas, and include a terrace with a comfortable seating arrangement or traditional Balinese "day bed" for relaxation. Some suites also enjoy a large sun deck, private Jacuzzi, and well-appointed dining area for entertaining in style and privacy.

Grand 1 and 2 bedroom Villas with Private Pool

For an ultimate vacation, the Grand 1 and 2 bedroom Villas set a new standard of luxury. The 200 square meter premises offer bedroom quarters set in a thatched-roof Balinese bungalow. Villas enjoy outdoor living areas with seating and dining facilities surrounded by lush tropical gardens, fountains, and a private swimming pool.

The Restaurant

Overlooking the gardens and swimming pool area, the hotel's restaurant serves a selection of the finest Asian and international cuisine. Choose from an extensive buffet or our a la carte menu. Two large traditional garden pavilions are available for intimate fine dining.

The Grand Bali – Nusa Dua


The Many Charms of Bali's East Coast
New Cruise Port Set to Open in 2009 Expected to Spark Tourism Boom in Candi Dasa.

The Indonesian Daily Kompas reports that while many tourists continue to visit the Island's main tourist areas of Kuta, Legian, and even Denpasar – those in seek of peace and quiet should consider heading for Bali's eastern shores which offers restful holidays, tourism objects rich in spiritual undertones and a wide range of sea tourism options.

The many charms of East Bali are often overshadowed by the higher visibility enjoyed by Bali's South, the artist's colony of Ubud and the volcanic crater at Kintamani. However, the recent construction of a new east coast highway in Bali has reduced driving time from the South Island to East Bali from 3 hours to just 1.5 hours and, as a result, opened this area to increased levels of tourist visits.

Those traveling along Bali's new I.B, Mantra highway that has shrunken the distance between the tourism areas of South Bali to the East Coast, can now rediscover Bali's sacred Mother Temple of Besakih and pleasure palaces built by East Bali royalty in the Island's recent past.

Candi Dasa

Those visiting the charming village of Candi Dasa, a tourist enclave near the port of Padang Bai, will find 300 star-classified hotel rooms and 400 non-starred rooms along a beach offering uninterrupted views across the straits toward Lombok island and Nusa Penida. Nearby small islands and secluded sand beaches have made this island "a natural" destination for divers and water-sports enthusiasts. Those enjoying the full range of accommodation and dining options available at Candi Dasa, are also well-positioned for full day forays to the excellent diving available to the north at Ahmed and Tulamben.

The regent of Karangasem, I Wayan Geredek, told Kompas that his regency suffers from a lack of exposure in Bali's program of promotion. Supporting Geredek's complaints of promotional neglect are figures from the Provincial tourism authority showing average occupancy of Karangasem hotels stands at around 50%, far below the averages of 90% being achieved in other parts of the island.

In an effort to attract more tourists, the government of Karangasem has spent Rp. 3 billion (US$326,000) over the past three years improving the area's infrastructure, including street lighting in Candi Dasa and public parking facilities at local tourism sites.

Coming Soon: A Cruise Ship Port

Tourism hopes in Karangasem are pinned to plans to establish an international standard cruise ship terminal, targeted for completion in the first half of 2009. The terminal will be located at the Port of Amuk at Manggis, some 5 kilometers from Candi Dasa and not far from the current port of Padang Bai.

Geredek hopes that the new port will improve the local tourism economy and make his area a gateway to Lombok and East Nusa Tenggara.

The construction of the new cruise port located some 60 kilometers from Bali's capital of Denpasar, will consume Rp. 70 billion (US$7.6 million) of the State (National) budget, Rp. 15 billion (US$1.6 million) of the Provincial budget, and Rp. 3.5 billion (US$380,400) of Karangasem's budget. Add that all together for a total budget of US$9.5 million to complete the development of terminal complex on an 1.5 hectare site that will include two 150 meter piers. When placed into operation these piers will allow large cruise ships to dock in Bali, a vast improvement over the past when ocean going vessels were compelled to anchor far offshore and ferry their passengers between ship and the main port.

Geredek is optimistic that the new port will eventually serve 200 cruise ships each year, with each ship carrying 1,000 tourists.


Adam Air Gets it Wings Clipped
Government Suspends Operating Permits of Indonesian Low-Cost Airline.

The worst fears for Indonesia's Adam Air predicted in coverage on Balidiscovery.com[See: The Eve of Adam Air] have come to past. The Indonesian Department of Transportation has banned all airplanes operated by PT Adam Sky Connection Airlines - the owners of Adam Air, from performing any commercial flights. With their operating permit suspended, Adam Air has been given 3 months to revamp its operation or face the permanent suspension of the air operating certificate (AOC) held by the carrier.

The Director General of Civil Aviation, Budhi Mulyawan Suyitno, told the Bali Post on Tuesday, March 18, 2008, "the banning of all flights by Adam Air are stipulated in a decision from the Directorate of Air Communications number AU/1724/DSKU/0862."

Budhi announced that the grounding of Adam Air took effect from Wednesday, March 19th at one minute past midnight. According to the Aviation Regulator, the decision to ground the Airline was made after a number of deficiencies were discovered in operation areas, manpower regulation and aircraft maintenance. According to Budhi, the preliminary investigation of a recent non-fatal crash of an Adam Air flight in Batam uncovered a number of significant deficiencies, including pilots who were apparently witless on how to handle an in-flight emergency situation.

The Government determined that Adam Air had failed to perform the required training and supervision functions in the implementation of standard-operating-procedures for their fleet of Boeing 737s. Because of this, shortly before the grounding, the Government assumed control of the Airline's check pilot proficiency program for pilots and instructors employed by Adam Air.

In reviewing Adam Air's maintenance programs the Government also found that several spare parts lacked required air worthiness certification.

Like nails in a coffin sealing the Airline's fate, within a single month Adam Air crashed a plane in Batam; saw a 50% investor in the Company suddenly withdraw financial support; was forced to return aircraft to leasing companies when charter payments were missed; and was eventually grounded by a Government order. To some extent the grounding order by the Indonesian government was rendered moot by an almost simultaneous announcement from the Airline that they would suspend services due to their inability to meet an insurance premium payments.

At its commercial height's, Adam Air operated 7 flights a day to Bali's Ngurah Rai International Airport.

More Bad News to Come?

The world of troubles befalling Adam Air precede the anticipated issuance in late March 2007 of official findings surrounding the loss of an aircraft with all 202 souls on board that occurred near Sulawesi on New Year's Day 2007.

Related Stories

[The Eve of Adam Air]

[Adam Air Sells 50% of its Shares]

[Adam Air to be Shut Down?]

[Adam Air Reaps a Bitter Apple]

[Boeing . . .Boeing . . Bong!]

[Adam Air to Undergo Safety Audit]

[Flight KI-574 Where are You?]


Bali Travellers Warned on Dengue Risks
Dengue Cases Among Western Australian Visitors to Bali on the Rise. Some Practical Tips for a Healthy Bali Holiday.

A three to four-fold increase in the number of cases of Western Australian (WA) travelers stricken by Dengue Fever shortly after a Bali holiday has caused the Acting Director of Communicable Disease Control in WA, Dr. Gary Dowse, to issue warnings against mosquito bites when visiting the holiday island.

According to Dr. Dowse, 54 WA travelers contracted the malarial disease in 2007 with a further 16 cases reported in January 2008. 60% of the WA infections of Dengue Fever were linked to Indonesian travel with 76% of those cases linked to Bali visits.

Other cases reported in WA have been tied to visits to Thailand, Singapore, India, Vietnam, and the Philippines.

Things You Need to Know

• Symptoms - Dengue is a mosquito-borne illness that will manifest itself 3-14 days after being bitten by an infected insect. Symptoms vary, but include severe headache, aching joints and muscle, pain behind the eye, nausea and rashes.

• Treatment -Those who receive medical treatment almost universally recover completely from Dengue. A rare, but highly dangerous, form of the disease is Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever can lead to profuse bleeding necessitating transfusions.

• Precautions

- Those people visiting areas where dengue infections are being reported should avoid outdoor exposure in areas of "high mosquito activity," particularly at dawn and dusk.

- Stay in mosquito-proof accommodation. Sleep under a mosquito net, if there are mosquitoes seen in your sleeping area.

- Wear trousers and long-sleeved clothing when outside in mosquito-ridden areas.

- Use repellents containing diethyl toulamide or picaridin which are available in both lotion and gel forms. A popular local brand readily available in Bali is Autan.

- Children and infants need special care in terms of protective clothing and protected sleeping areas. Make sure repellents are rated safe for use by children.


Whose Travel Advisory is It, Anyway?
Local Tourism Leader Takes Aim at General Made Pastika for Promising to Remove Australian Travel Warnings if Elected Governor.

Recent press reports claiming Bali's gubernatorial candidate Made Mangku Pastika promised to remove Australian travel advisories once he is elected to office have earned a stinging rebuke from the Chairman of the Bali's Chamber of Commerce, Gde Wiratha.

According to the Bali Post, Bali's former Bali Police Chief, General Pastika, told the press in the Bali regency of Karangasem recently that he was prepared to suspend the Australian travel advisory for Bali.

However, when the Bali Post contacted the Australian Embassy in Jakarta the press attachι affirmed that travel advisories issued by the Australian government are the exclusive purview of the issuing authority and are unaffected by who is elected to Bali’s governor's post.

In a written response to a question from the Bali Post, the Australian Embassy in Jakarta replied: "The Australian Government has a current travel advisory for Indonesia, as we have for most other countries. We monitor the state of those travel advisories on a regular basis and they are regularly updated and constantly reviewed. The paramount concern for the Australian Government is the protection, safety and security of Australian nationals traveling or living abroad."

Wiratha, who recently had his eye on Bali's governor post before failing to earn his party's nomination, asked the Bali Post: "How would a governor be able to guarantee he will remove a travel warning? Why, even President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono can't cancel travel warnings!"

Wiratha, who is also the former Chairman of the Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI) for Bali, said that travel advisories are the policy of a sovereign nation used to protect its citizens from perceived threats. Adding, Australia's travel warnings or travel advisories apply to all of Indonesia, not only Bali. "According to me," said Wiratha, "what needs to be pushed is public participation. If everyone participates, Bali will be safe, no matter who serves as governor."

Irrational and Stupid?

Cutting little slack for the Police General and his former political rival, Wiratha branded "some of the ideas and promises put forth by candidates (for governor) are irrational hinging on the ignorant." For example, he explained, the promise that Australian travel warnings will be revoked when you are elected governor. Adding, "it is as thought the security issues is reduced to the sole concern of tourism, when in fact security is a concern of everyone in Bali."


Smooth Sailing Ahead
Indonesia's Forecasters Claim the Worst is Over Following Several Months of Stormy Weather.

Indonesia's Meteorology and Geophysics Agency reports that the high seas and nasty weather that have plagued Bali in recent weeks will soon be at an end. As reported by Tempo Interaktif, Furqon, an official of the Agency, said on March 17, 2008, "waves will be at a maximum of 3 meters, and that only in the southern part of the Island."

Furqon went on to explain the wind speeds have reduced and the cyclonic and convergent winds are no longer an influence on the weather for Bali. The forecaster also said that waves with a height of 2-3 meters that have threatened fishing boats and tugs are now limited to the water south of Banten and the Sangihe Taulaud islands in the Halmahera Sea.

Waves of 1.25 – 2 meters will be encountered in the waters off Western Sumatra, the Sunda straits, the southern waters off West Java until western Nusa Tenggara, the Natuna Sea, the waters east of the Riau islands, the Sulawesi Sea, the Maluku Sea, the Seram Sea, the water off northern Papua, and the Arafuru sea. Waves of this height, according to Furgon, are only a problem for local fishing boats.

The signaling that severe weather across Indonesia is on the decline is welcome news. Unusually large waves and high winds have played havoc on Indonesian shipping during the first 3 months of 2008, been blamed for several mishaps at sea and forced fisherman to remain in port. High seas have also disrupted the power grid for Bali and Java, preventing ships carrying coal supplies for state-owned power plants from replenishing fuel stocks.


Bali – The Best Triathlon Destination
Saluting Those Helping to Make Bali a World-Class Triathlon Destination. Building on Success - 2nd Triathlon Set for June 29, 2008.

In June of 2007, Bali hosted its first triathlon – an epic race combining 1.5 km of ocean swimming, 40 km of cycling and 10 kms of running - all undertaken either individually or in teams of three. Drawing over 200 athletes to an event that began and finished on Bali's picturesque Jimbaran Bay, the inaugural event was a success by any standard, a fact further emphasized by Bali's selection as "Best Triathlon Destination" by the prestigious Competitors Magazine (U.S.A.).

In keeping with the organizer's concept, the Bali race presented a distinctively Balinese event combining races along the Island's picturesque southern peninsula passing traditional villages, where sarong-clad race marshals stood guard, and included a traditional blessing of the bikes and their riders by a Balinese priest.

As Bali prepares for the 2nd Bali International Triathlon on Sunday, June 29, 2008, a gathering of key players joined a lunch in their honor on March 18, 2008, sponsored by the Four Seasons Resort at Jimbaran Bay. Presented with awards acknowledging their selfless support of Bali's first triathlon that resulted in the destination award for Bali were :

• A.A. Gde Agung, the Bupati (Regent) of Badung in Bali.

• The People of Jimbaram represented by the Lurah, the local community leader.

• Inspector General Paulus Purwoko, Chief of Police for the island of Bali.

• Drs. Gede Nurjaya, Head of the Bali Tourism Authority

• I Made Mandra, Head of the Bali Tourism Development Corporation.

• Michael Burchett, Chairman of the Bali Hotel Association.

• John O'Sullivan, General Manager of Four Seasons Resorts in Bali.

More Participants, More Fun at 2008 Event

Growing support from the island of Bali and sponsors ensure that this year's event, scheduled for Sunday, June 29, 2008, will stay on track with its plans to become a major event on the international sports calendar. Some of the highlights for June's event include:

• A planned near 50% increase in registered participants.

• An expanded "beach party" at the start/finish line at the Four Season's Coconut Grove on Jimbaran Beach with live music, vendor kiosks and award presentation.

• Participation by international celebrity triathletes.

• Expanded corporate team challenge category participation with a "competition within the competition" among 3-person teams drawn from the ranks of Bali's leading hotels.

• Exciting prizes for overall and age/sec category winners, including prize purses for top Indonesian finishers.

Register Now

Registration details are available at the [ Bali International Triathlon Official Website].

Registration for individuals and teams include the race and admission to a pre-race sundowner June 27th and a High-Card dinner on June 28th – both hosted at the award-winning Four Seasons Resort at Jimbaran Bay.

Bali Discovery Tours is offering a range of attractive accommodation options for both race participants and spectators via the official website.

Bali International Triathlon is operated by Bali International Triathlon LLC (USA) - supported by Bali Discovery Tours (Indonesia) and Generic Events (USA).


 
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Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
January 07, 2008

Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
December 17, 2007

Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
November 05, 2007

Bali Update #581
October 29, 2007

Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
October 15, 2007

Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
September 10, 2007

Bali Update #573
September 03, 2007

Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
August 20, 2007

Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006

Bali Update #500
April 10, 2006

Bali Update #499
April 03, 2006

Bali Update #498
March 27, 2006

Bali Update #497
March 20, 2006

Bali Update #496
March 13, 2006

Bali Update #495
March 06, 2006

Bali Update #494
February 27, 2006

Bali Update #493
February 20, 2006

Bali Update #492
February 13, 2006

Bali Update #491
February 06, 2006

Bali Update #490
January 30, 2006

Bali Update #489
January 23, 2006

Bali Update #488
January 16, 2006

Bali Update #487
January 09, 2006

Bali Update #486
January 02, 2006

Bali Update #485
December 26, 2005

Bali Update #484
December 19, 2005

Bali Update #482
December 12, 2005

Bali Update #481
December 05, 2005

Bali Update #481
November 28, 2005

Bali Update #480
November 21, 2005

Bali Update #479
November 14, 2005

Bali Update #478
November 07, 2005

Bali Update #477
October 31, 2005

Bali Update #476
October 24, 2005

Bali Update #475
October 17, 2005

Bali Update #474
October 10, 2005

Bali Update #473
October 03, 2005

Bali Update #472
September 26, 2005

Bali Update #471
September 19, 2005

Bali Update #470
September 12, 2005

Bali Update #469
September 05, 2005

Bali Update #468
August 29, 2005

Bali Update #467
August 22, 2005

Bali Update #466
August 15, 2005

Bali Update #465
August 08, 2005

Bali Update #464
August 01, 2005

Bali Update #463
July 25, 2005

Bali Update #462
July 18, 2005

Bali Update #461
July 11, 2005

Bali Update #460
July 04, 2005

Bali Update #459
June 27, 2005

Bali Update #458
June 20, 2005

Bali Update #457
June 13, 2005

Bali Update #456
June 06, 2005

Bali Update #455
May 30, 2005

Bali Update #454
May 23, 2005

Bali Update #453
May 16, 2005

Bali Update #452
May 09, 2005

Bali Update #451
May 02, 2005

Bali Update #450
April 25, 2005

Bali Update #449
April 18, 2005

Bali Update #448
April 11, 2005

Bali Update #447
April 04, 2005

Bali Update #446
March 28, 2005

Bali Update #445
March 21, 2005

Bali Update #444
March 14, 2005

Bali Update #443
March 07, 2005

Bali Update #442
February 28, 2005

Bali Update #441
February 21, 2005

Bali Update #440
February 14, 2005

Bali Update #439
February 07, 2005

Bali Update #438
January 31, 2005

Bali Update #437
January 24, 2005

Bali Update #436
January 17, 2005

Bali Update #435
January 10, 2005

Bali Update #434
January 03, 2005

Bali Update #433
December 27, 2004

Bali Update #432
December 20, 2004

Bali Update #431
December 13, 2004

Bali Update #430
December 06, 2004

Bali Update #429
November 29, 2004

Bali Update #428
November 22, 2004

Bali Update #427
November 15, 2004

Bali Update #426
November 08, 2004

Bali Update #425
November 01, 2004

Bali Update #424
October 25, 2004

Bali Update #423
October 18, 2004

Bali Update #422
October 11, 2004

Bali Update #421
October 04, 2004

Bali Update #420
September 27, 2004

Bali Update #419
September 20, 2004

Bali Update #418
September 13, 2004

Bali Update #417
September 06, 2004

Bali Update #416
August 30, 2004

Bali Update #415
August 23, 2004

Bali Update #414
August 16, 2004

Bali Update #413
August 09, 2004

Bali Update #412
August 02, 2004

Bali Update #411
July 26, 2004

Bali Update #410
July 19, 2004

Bali Update #409
July 12, 2004

Bali Update #408
July 05, 2004

Bali Update #407
June 28, 2004

Bali Update #406
June 21, 2004

Bali Update #405
June 14, 2004

Bali Update #404
June 07, 2004

Bali Update #403
May 31, 2004

Bali Update #402
May 24, 2004

Bali Update #401
May 17, 2004

Bali Update #400
May 10, 2004

Bali Update #399
May 03, 2004

Bali Update #398
April 26, 2004

Bali Update #397
April 19, 2004

Bali Update #396
April 12, 2004

Bali Update #395
April 05, 2004

Bali Update #394
March 29, 2004

Bali Update #393
March 22, 2004

Bali Update #392
March 15, 2004

Bali Update #391
March 08, 2004

Bali Update #390
March 01, 2004

Bali Update #389
February 23, 2004

Bali Update #388
February 16, 2004

Bali Update #387
February 09, 2004

Bali Update #386
February 02, 2004

Bali Update #385
January 26, 2004

Bali Update #384
January 19, 2004

Bali Update #383
January 12, 2004

Bali Update #382
January 05, 2004

Bali Update #381
December 29, 2003

Bali Update #380
December 22, 2003

Bali Update #379
December 15, 2003

Bali Update #378
December 08, 2003

Bali Update #377
December 01, 2003

Bali Update #376
November 24, 2003

Bali Update #375
November 17, 2003

Bali Update #374
November 10, 2003

Bali Update #373
November 03, 2003

Bali Update #372
October 27, 2003

Bali Update #371
October 20, 2003

Bali Update #370
October 13, 2003

Bali Update #369
October 06, 2003

Bali Update #368
September 29, 2003

Bali Update #367
September 22, 2003

Bali Update #366
September 15, 2003

Bali Update #365
September 08, 2003

Bali Update #364
September 01, 2003

Bali Update #363
August 25, 2003

Bali Update #362
August 18, 2003

Bali Update #361
August 11, 2003

Bali Update #360
August 04, 2003

Bali Update #359
July 28, 2003

Bali Update #358
July 21, 2003

Bali Update #357
July 14, 2003

Bali Update #356
July 07, 2003

Bali Update #355
June 30, 2003

Bali Update #354
June 23, 2003

Bali Update #353
June 16, 2003

Bali Update #352
June 09, 2003

Bali Update #351
June 02, 2003

Bali Update #350
May 26, 2003

Bali Update #349
May 19, 2003

Bali Update #348
May 12, 2003

Bali Update #347
May 05, 2003

Bali Update #346
April 28, 2003

Bali Update #345
April 21, 2003

Bali Update #344
April 14, 2003

Bali Update #343
April 08, 2003

Bali Update #342
April 07, 2003

Bali Update #341
March 31, 2003

Bali Update #340
March 24, 2003

Bali Update #339
March 17, 2003

Bali Update #338
March 10, 2003

Bali Update #337
March 03, 2003

Bali Update #336
February 24, 2003

Bali Update #335
February 17, 2003

Bali Update #334
February 10, 2003

Bali Update #333
February 03, 2003

Bali Update #332
January 27, 2003

Bali Update #331
January 20, 2003

Bali Update #330
January 13, 2003

Bali Update #329
January 06, 2003

Bali Update #328
December 30, 2002

Bali Update #327
December 23, 2002

Bali Update #326
December 16, 2002

Bali Update #325
December 09, 2002

Bali Update #324
December 02, 2002

Bali Update #323
November 25, 2002

Bali Update #322
November 18, 2002

Bali Update #321
November 11, 2002

Bali Update #320
November 04, 2002

Bali Update #319
October 28, 2002

Bali Update #318
October 21, 2002

Bali Update #317
October 14, 2002

Bali Update #316
October 07, 2002

Bali Update #315
September 30, 2002

Bali Update #314
September 23, 2002

Bali Update #313
September 16, 2002

Bali Update #312
September 09, 2002

Bali Update #311
September 02, 2002

Bali Update #310
August 26, 2002

Bali Update #309
August 19, 2002

Bali Update #308
August 12, 2002

Bali Update #307
August 05, 2002

Bali Update #306
July 29, 2002

Bali Update #305
July 22, 2002

Bali Update #304
July 15, 2002

Bali Update #303
July 08, 2002

Bali Update #302
July 01, 2002

Bali Update #301
June 24, 2002

Bali Update #300
June 17, 2002

Bali Update #299
June 10, 2002

Bali Update #298
June 03, 2002

Bali Update #297
May 27, 2002

Bali Update #296
May 20, 2002

Bali Update #295
May 13, 2002

Bali Update #294
May 06, 2002

Bali Update #293
April 29, 2002

Bali Update #292
April 22, 2002

Bali Update #291
April 15, 2002

Bali Update #290
April 08, 2002

Bali Update #289
April 01, 2002

Bali Update #288
March 25, 2002

Bali Update #287
March 18, 2002

Bali Update #286
March 11, 2002

Bali Update #285
March 04, 2002

Bali Update #284
February 25, 2002

Bali Update #283
February 18, 2002

Bali Update #282
February 11, 2002

Bali Update #281
February 04, 2002

Bali Update #280
January 28, 2002

Bali Update #279
January 21, 2002

Bali Update #278
January 14, 2002

Bali Update #277
January 07, 2002

Bali Update #276
December 31, 2001

Bali Update #275
December 24, 2001

Bali Update #274
December 17, 2001

Bali Update #273
December 10, 2001

Bali Update #272
December 03, 2001

Bali Update #271
November 26, 2001

Bali Update #270
November 19, 2001

Bali Update #269
November 12, 2001

Bali Update #268
November 05, 2001

Bali Update #267
October 29, 2001

Bali Update #266
October 22, 2001

Bali Update #265
October 15, 2001

Bali Update #264
October 08, 2001

Bali Update #263
October 01, 2001

Bali Update #262
September 24, 2001

Bali Update #261
September 17, 2001

Bali Update #260
September 10, 2001

Bali Update #259
September 03, 2001

Bali Update #258
August 27, 2001

Bali Update #257
August 20, 2001

Bali Update #256
August 13, 2001

Bali Update #255
August 06, 2001

Bali Update #254
July 30, 2001
 

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