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BALI UPDATE #674 - 10 August 2009

Wandering Ripples
Solo Exhibition by Rie Mandala in Ubud August 28 - September 27, 2009.

Life is a collage for artist Rie Mandala. From her native Japan, across Asia, to Canada and the U.S.A., Rie has lived, traveled and exhibited across the globe, absorbing and observing a mélange of cultures along the way. "Wandering Ripples" her latest exhibition is a collection of some 20 works of art, documenting this world-wide search of self-discovery.
While studying design at Okinawa University in Japan, Rie came to the realization that, in order to go beyond design and follow the evolving creative process, she needed to go on a journey. She then left the land of her birth, becoming a nomadic artists that, early in her travels brought her to Ubud in Bali, and ignited an enduring love for Indonesia.
In ‘Wandering Ripples,' this talented artist explores the many doors she has passed through, mixing new cultures with her own and concentrating the elements with pure water. "How I open these doors and appreciate the worlds within is stamped directly on the art pieces which are created with found materials from each ripple," she explains.
Rie's main medium is collage, using paper and materials she collects on her travels, particularly printed matter. This is a conscious effort on her part to recycle discarded items, creating something new from old. While Rie adopts a methodical and logical approach to the choice in positioning and consideration of the expressive quality of objects, her collaborations with foreign artists have given her a deeper understanding of foreign cultures. This process of assimilations is uniquely expressed in her artistic process.
Working with her hands and expressing her empiricism of many foreign countries translates into colorful and richly textured compositions infused with the innate spirit of her homeland.
"Wandering Ripples"
A solo exhibition by Rie Mandala
Alila Living Gallery, Alila Ubud,
August 28 to September 27, 2009


ar to Move Against Trash Burning
City Officials in Bali's Capital to Reduce Air Pollution by Enforcing No Trash Burning Rules.

In order to reduce air pollution in Bali, the Denpasar municipal government's Cleaning and Park Services Department (DKP) is promising to take strong action against those who openly burn trash.
As reported by Radar Bali, the Head of the DKP, Ketut Wisada, said stern measures were needed to combat the increasingly polluted air quality in Bali's capital city of Denpasar.
"Part of the problem is due to smoke from burning trash," explained Wisada. He also said that laws are already on the books that prohibit the burning of rubbish.
The man charged with keeping Denpasar clean and tidy said, that in the final analysis, waste must be managed. This can be done in a variety of ways, including recycling programs.
Wisada admitted that before any sanctions were meted out to local citizens caught burning their rubbish, his department would first undertake an educational and socialization process.
The DKP has already established 182 rubbish collection points in urban villages and communities spread across Denpasar. Plans are to increase the number of collection points to 392, a number equal to the number of banjar or traditional villages found in the capital.
Wisada told Radar Bali that his office will provide moveable rubbish containers for each banjar prepared to establish a waste management system. "We already have prepared 100 moveable containers," Wisada explained.
In closing, Wisada bemoaned the fact that he only has a fleet of 35 trucks for removing trash to the City's trash disposal area. He admits that this number of trucks is inadequate to meet the burgeoning demand for trash removal services in the capital.


What's in a Name?
Indonesia's Home Minister Mardiyanto Complains Foreign Names Not Appropriate for Local Destinations within Indonesia.

Indonesia's Home Minister, Mardiyanto, is concerned with the increasing number of foreign-sounding names used for geographical locations across Bali and the potential threat to the local historical quality of the island posed by foreign sounding names being used for Balinese locales.
As reported in BeritaBali.com, the Minister complained that some of the new foreign names adopted for Bali sub-destinations have no connection with local history or the cultural roots of the subject locale. If this situation is allowed to continue, the Home Minister is concerned that the traditional culture of Bali, communicated through the name of places and areas on the island, will eventually be lost.
In making his comments to the press, Mardiyanto gave no specific examples of foreign-sounding names now in Bali. BeritaBali.com did, however, point to the popular surfing beach of "Dreamland" and "Jalan Marlboro (west of Jalan Teuku Umar), as just two examples of the increasingly frequent use of foreign place names.
Speaking in Bali on August 4, 2009, at the Southeast Asian Survey Congress in Nusa Dua, Minister Mardiyanto said: "A number of places in Bali have changed their names, using foreign names or creative new names invented by foreign tourists. In some instances, these newly created terms become more popular that the actual names of the locales. In time, there is the real threat that the local names will disappear, replaced by the new foreign names. This is the equivalent of shaking our younger generation loose from their local cultural roots."
The Home Minister told the press that it is time for the government to bring order to the use of geographical place names in Indonesia, in order to prevent the use of foreign names for Indonesian places. Mardiyanto insisted that the history and legends connected with Indonesian place names should be preserved. In doing so, he said the government will preserve local culture and imbue the public with pride and a love of nation.
Mardiyanto concluded: "The names of place and their historical connection provide the Indonesian people with their pride of place and national identity. It is therefore very important to preserve historical names of geographical sites. Replacing geographical names in a haphazard manner without reference to history or culture will diminish the connection of the people with their place of birth."


Hee Ah Lee in Concert in Bali August 14, 2009.
Inspiring South Korean Pianist in Bali to Help Raise Funds for Westin's UNICEF'S "Check out for Children" Program.

As part of The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali's collaboration in the UNICEF Check out for Children Program, a remarkable musical event will be held at the Auditorium of the Bali International Convention Center (BICC) at 6:00 p.m. on Friday, August 14, 2009.
Dream the Impossible Dream

24 year-old South Korean pianist Hee Ah Lee is a professional musician who travels the world thrilling audiences with her artistic virtuosity. She has performed with her idol Richard Clayderman; played in recital at The White House in Washington, D.C.; and won numerous awards including First Prize at the Korean National Music Contest when she was just 7 years-old.
Such achievement in one so young is noteworthy, but for a girl who was born with severe physical deformities, Hee Ah Lee's undeniable talent is breathtakingly inspiring. Born with only two fingers on each hand, afflicted with down syndrome and legs that end at her knees - doctors who attended her birth did not expect the child to survive. But, survive and thrive she did. Unable to even hold a pencil in her deformed hands, Hee Ah Lee took up the piano at the age of six with a discipline and determined ferocity that saw her sitting for hour on end at the keyboard. The results of this life-long connection with the keyboard are seen today in sparkling performances that dazzle and impress fellow pianist who concertize with a full set of fingers.
Following rave reviews for her appearance in Jakarta in March 2007, Hee Ah Lee travels to Bali on Friday, August 14th for her second Indonesian performance, entitled "Dream the Impossible Dream."
Proceeds from the performance will go to the UNICEF Check Out for Children Challenge which raised more than AU$93,000 in 2008 towards efforts to immunize thousands of children in the Asia Pacific region against major childhood diseases.
In 2009, "the Challenge" has again adopted child survival as its theme. Every hour more than 300 children die because they lack access to lifesaving vaccines. UNICEF supply vaccines to 40% of children in the developing world, yet each year more than 30 million children miss out on needed immunization. For only US$30, a child can be immunized against the main childhood diseases of diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, polio, measles, childhood tuberculosis and hepatitis B.
Tickets for the concert cost Rp. 50,000 (US$5.00).
"Dream the Impossible Dream" – A Piano Concert by Hee Ah Lee
Friday, August 14, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.
Auditorium – Bali International Convention Center, Nusa Dua Bali
Admission Rp. 50,000 (US$5.00)

For more information telephone the Westin's UNICEF Ambassador, Nyoman Satryani at ++62(0)8123887390.


A Party to Make You Envious
'Envy' Hosts Bali's Travel Industry to a 'Recharge Night.'

After a pause of several months, the monthly "Recharge" party for members of Bali's tourism industry reemerged on Friday, August 7, 2009 at Envy - the seaside venue at the Holiday Inn Resort Baruna, Bali.
Demonstrating conclusively that tourism workers know how to party, hundreds gathered for free drinks provided by Hatten's Wines and Bali Moon Liquor and delicious food supplied by the Holiday Inn Resort Baruna, Bali.
Capoeira (Ka-pu-e-ira) dance performances, drumming teams, painted body-builders and door prizes added to the festivities as the night progressed.
"Recharge Parties" in Bali are made possible through the generous sponsorship and coordination of "Bali & Beyond" Magazine.
Shown on Balidiscovery.com are some snapshots from the fun-filled evening.


Mental Health in Bali: The Darker Side of Paradise
Bali Institute Hosts a Dialogue on Mental Health in Bali, Tuesday, August 18, 2009 in Ubud.

The Bali Institute is hosting a dialogue with Professor Dr. Luh Ketut Suryani,M.D., Ph.D., of the Suryani Institute for Mental Health on Tuesday, August 18, 2009, at the Arma Watergarden Restaurant in Ubud.
Dr. Suryani will lead a discussion of current mental health issues specific to Bali and provide a glimpse into daily life beyond the island's daily ceremonies and rituals.
Dr. Suryani is the former department head of psychiatry at Udayana University and is a major advocate on Balinese mental health issues. The author of numerous books on spirituality and mental health, she has received many awards and appears on her own local television show focused on women's issues.
The Darker Side of Paradise
A Dialogue with Professor Dr. Luh Ketut Suryani, M.D., Ph.D.

Tuesday, August 18, 2009
Arma Watergarden Restaurant - 7:00 – 9:00 P.M.
Admission Rp, 100,000 (US$10) with no charge for Indonesian guests

For more information telephone ++62-(0) 8174706246


Bali Discovery Welcomes Ricky Johansyah
Bali Discovery Tours Appoints Experienced Travel Industry Veteran as Director of Operations.

Effective 01 August 2009, Ricky Johansyah has joined the team at Bali Discovery Tours and www.balidiscovery.com in the capacity of Director of Operations.
A proud father of five, Johnsyah has over two decades of travel industry experience in a range of capacities at tour and travel companies, and five star hotels. Most recently, he worked as the General Manager of a tour and travel company in Jakarta.
Happy to be returning to Bali and apply his extensive knowledge of Bali-based travel with his new employers, Ricky has also held management posts while working abroad in Hong Kong and Thailand.
Ricky told balidiscovery.com: "It's great to be joining the team of established professionals at Bali Discovery with everyone proudly working for one of Bali's most recognized destination management companies and event organizers. I particularly look forward to helping balidiscovery.com and ayokebali.com achieve new sales heights, as well as directing a very busy mice, incentive and conference department."
Arie Sukirno, Managing Director of Bali Discovery Tours said: "Ricky has the kind of wide-ranging experience of hotel, tour and customer service that will see him in good stead with the responsibilities he holds with Bali Discovery. The careful handover now underway from Ricky's predecessor, M. Fathur Rozi, assures a seamless transition for Ricky and a bright future for our company."
Ricky Johansyah replaces the much respected M. Fathur Rozi who is pursuing new business interests outside the travel industry. Rozi will stay on in a consulting role for several months, assisting Ricky in the transition into his new position.


Bali Police Chief Pledges to Keep Bali Safe
General Sutisna Seeks Support and Cooperation from Balinese People to Keep Island Safe from Terror Threats.

Bai's new Chief of Police, Inspector General Sutisna, has pledged to optimize security in Bali, citing security as his main responsibility during his Bali assignment. As reported on beritaBali.com, General Sutisna sees Bali as still threatened by the possibility of terrorist attacks.
In a meeting with senior police officers serving under his command held on Monday, August 3, 2009, General Sutisna underlined that he would continue the programs of his predecessor, General Teuku Ashikin, in order to retain and further enhance the currently conducive security situation in Bali.
"Lets think together to consider ways to retain Bali's cultural identity," said Sutisna. The new man in charge of policing in Bali also said he concurred with General Ashikin that Bali is an icon of national security. For this reason, he hoped the people of Bali would accept his assignment to their island and allow him to continue to maintain security and safety. Adding, "I hope the people of Bali will embrace my presence so we can work together to create a secure situation for Bali."
Sharing the stage with his successor, outgoing police chief General Ashikin said terrorists still pose a real threat to Bali. Moreover, he fears that Bali continues to be a target for terrorists. This fact must serve as an incentive to urge those charge with security to do their utmost to keep Bali safe.
Ashikin told those in attendance that Bali's role as an icon of security in Indonesia, makes defending the island necessary to retain the world's faith in the Republic of Indonesia.
Driving home his point, Genera Ashikin said that the sea and air gateways to Bali have always been guarded by the Bali police. Recent bombings in Jakarta, however, have served to make the police redouble their diligence in guarding Bali's access points.


Two Foreigners Wanted as Pedophiles Extradited from Bali
Bali Police Ship Home a Frenchman and an Australian to Face Consequences of Pedophilia Charges.

After sitting behind bars at Bali's Kerobokan prison for nearly eight months, a man on Interpol's Most Wanted List, 46 year-old Christian Burger, is now in France to face child sexual abuse charges. Burger, who has both French and Swiss citizenship, was placed on a plane to Paris on Wednesday, August 5, 2009, following the issuance of a letter agreeing to his extradition signed by Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.
That President Yudhoyono has issued the needed letter on Monday, August 3rd, was confirmed by Public Prosecutor I Ketut Sujaya, SH.
Radar Bali reports that prior to his departure from the Kerobokan Prison at 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Burger received a medical check from prison doctors. He was taken directly from the prison to Bali's Ngurah Rai International Airport accompanied by Department of Justice officials and placed on board a Thai Airways flight that departed at 3:30 p.m. connecting in Bangkok with another Thai flight destined for Paris. Two officers from Interpol joined Burger on his repatriation flight.
Prior to his extradition, Burger, who originally hails from La Chaux Canton De Vaux in Switzerland, had the term of his imprisonment in Bali extended 8 separate times while the necessary paperwork were processed allowing his deportation and extradition.
Working on am Interpol warrant, Bali police tracked Burger down to an address in downtown Denpasar and arrested him on October 26, 2008. When apprehended, Burger was reportedly living in rented quarters with his wife and child. Police also found camera equipment and a laptop containing pictures of naked Indonesian children.
In France, Christian Burger is wanted in connection with an un-served sentence of four years for his conviction for violating the decency of a 15 year-old minor child.
After fleeing France in 1997 and prior to his arrest. Burger had resided in Thailand, the U.S.A., Mexico, Australia before commencing residency in Bali in 1998.
Suspected Australian Pedophile also Extradited
A 48 year-old Australian was also extradited on Thursday, August 6, 2009, in connection with the charge of assaulting a teenage girl.
Paul Francis Callahan was apprehended by Bali police in January after having run a surfing company in Bali for five years. At the time of his arrest, Callahan had an Indonesian wife and a daughter.
The Australian press reports that Callahan had fled Australia in 2002 following his interrogation in connection with the sexual assault of a minor female that occurred in Byron Bay.
A spokesman for he the Indonesian Justice Ministry said the apprehension and extradition of the two men should send a warning that: "Indonesia was not a refuge for people avoiding the law in their homelands. It also demonstrates that foreigners entering Indonesia must obey all the laws and not feel they can do as they like."


Hold Your Dragons!
Plans to Ship 10 Dragons from Komodo to Bali on Hold, for Now.

As reported on balidiscovery.com, plans by the Department of Forestry to move a sub-population of ten Komodos from West Flores to Bali is encountering strong resistance from Flores residents concerned that creating a large expatriate population of the world-famous largest monitor lizards would reduce the attractiveness of West Flores and Komodo as a tourist destination. [See: Komodo Dragons as Stay-at-Home Celebrities]
As reported by The Jakarta Globe, the Ministry of Forestry had reportedly decided to put the plan to move the dragons to Bali on hold, at least temporarily. The agreement to cancel the plan was revealed by West Nusa Tenggara's Governor Lebu Raya, who told the National News Agency Antara that the Minister of Forestry had decided to axe the plan.
Rebutting Governor Raya's reporting on their conversation, the Ministry denied he had made any decision to cancel the transfer of dragon, and was only postponing the move until a later time to allow more discussions with local stakeholders.
The Forestry Ministry denied plans to place the dragons on display at a Bali animal park, saying they were merely trying to establish a Bali breeding population of dragons for eventual replenishment of dwindling Komodo populations in the wild..
Bali's governor, Made Mangku Pastika also chimed in on the subject, telling beritabali.com that he would reject any plans to ship the 10 Komodos to Bali. Pastika said plans to diversity the genetic base of the lizards in Bali was not realistic and insisting that the wildlife icons were best left in Komodo and West Flores.
The governor also confirmed that he had yet to receive a formal request for the relocation of the Komodo for him to refuse.
Forestry officials have responded to Pastika's threat to bar the shipment of Komodos to Bali by claiming that the authority to approve or reject any decision to move Komodos to Bali is not within the authority of the governor.
Quoted in Kompas.com, the Director General of Forestry Preservation and Conservation from the Department of Forestry, Darori, said, "they have no right to refuse (the transfer) because this is not within their authority." Daori said the right of his department to move populations of endangered animals to new habitats was granted under Law Number 5 of 1999 on conserving nature.
Darori insist the relocation of the reptiles is needed to widen the genetic diversity of the species, threatened with inbreeding in West Flores and their eventual extinction.
A survey carried out by the Department of Forestry in 1991 counted 66 Komodos living outside the Komodo National Park in the Wae Wuul region. Another survey in 2008 counted only 17 Komodos in the region. Officials blame the declining populations on declining food sources, territorial conflicts with human populations, deforestation and illegal hunting.


Bali at the Crossroads
Jakarta Post Editorial by Leading Balinese Policymaker Raises Key Issues About the Island's Future.

The following editorial "Bali is Reaching a Crossroads" is reprinted from the Sunday, August 9, 2009 edition of The Jakarta Post. It was written by Dr. Anak Agung Gde Agung who is a graduate of Harvard (US) and Leiden (Holland) universities and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (US). He was a member of the Supreme Consultative Body (MPR - RI, 1999 - 2004) and was a Minister of Societal Affairs under President Abdurrahman Wahid..
Bali is Reaching a Crossroads
The rejection by the Bali administration to relocate 10 Komodo dragons from their natural habitat in Wae Wulu, West Manggarai, to the island province is a highly praiseworthy decision made for all the right reasons.
For one, forcing the komodo dragons to exist in a possibly harmful alien environment is worthy of mention. Secondly, Bali has shown it will not pursue its own goals as a cultural tourist destination at the expense of something more significant.
The second reason is a very important development in the mind set of Balinese officials, who have up until now only sought the maximum number of tourists by any means possible. The result has been catastrophic for the conservation of Bali's rich culture and environment.
The erosion of Bali's, tradition, culture and natural environment as a result of massive efforts to boost tourist numbers has occurred in a number of ways. The most visible is the overload in infrastructure and overuse of precious natural resources. Roads have become cramped with cars at all hours of night and day, while farmlands have disappeared at a rate of around 1000 hectares per year to make way for hotels, villas and malls.
All of Bali's 37 beaches and eight rivers have undergone serious transformations from their original states through development activities that have illegally violated building codes. Water levels at various points are so low they risk drying up altogether, inviting sea water to seep in. This problem and many more like it were foregone conclusions when the number of hotel rooms, set by French tourist company Sceto at a maximum 22.000 for Bali, exceeded the 70.000 mark. This excludes villas, home stays and condominiums which have mushroomed in quantum leaps these past few years.
The more fatal effect of this overload of tourists lies in the impact it has culturally. As farmlands are converted into tourist infrastructure, alienation not only occurs with the land but also to the temples, rituals, ceremonies and communal life - the essential lifestyle of the people who used to live on that land. The Balinese way of life, culture and tradition has been displaced in the blink of an eye.
Worse still, the hotels that have come to replace the indigenous farmers bring in their wake western values of individualism, meritocracy, efficiency and other modernist traits. These exist in stark contrast to the previous Balinese symbol-oriented society. Needless to say, rapid transformations occur wherever the Balinese language is abandoned for English as a sign of advancement.
Considering this tragic trend, the recent announcement by the Balinese administration that the focus of its tourist industry is cultural is therefore something of a landmark. If seriously adhered to, this could signal the reversal of some of these damaging trends Bali has been enduring.
Now that the intent is there, the administration needs to identify the means by which is plans to achieve its objectives, that is conserving the island's cultural and natural heritage.
The important point here, as far as tourist management is concerned, is to heed to the basic idea that tourists travel to a place to experience its unique cultural and natural environment. With this in mind, the administration should focus on three strategies.
First, it should aim to preserve and enhance the special cultures, traditions and natural environment of Bali through multifaceted defensive and motivational policies.
Next, it should bring in the right type of tourists who can appreciate the culture and natural environment of the island. It should stop emphasizing the sheer number of tourists arriving and begin advocating for the right kind of people it wishes to host. This will prevent Bali from becoming everything for everybody and eventually nothing for nobody. In short, it will protect it from losing its uniqueness. Those visiting Bali for its unique culture will reinvigorate local pride in culture.
Finally, Bali's key philosophy on life, the Tri Hita Karana, should be strengthened. The premise of the philosophy teaches that man in his every action should always heed his impact on the three main surroundings - his fellow being, his natural environment and his god or morality. In meeting his needs, man should balance them in such a way that the needs of those around him are not impaired.
He should adhere to the way of the Tri Hita Karana, or the "Sacred Balance", which governs behavior to conform to propriety, reciprocity and interconnection, all of which mean honoring heritage and conservation. If Balinese can truly live the way of the Tri Hita Karana, they will refrain from achieving their objectives at the expense of their tradition, culture and environment.
While the clock is ticking fast and Bali is rapidly approaching this crossroads, it is not too late to turn fate around. May the rejection of the Komodo dragons wake the Balinese to the dire danger that their rich heritage faces and galvanize them toward the right course of action.


ICAAP AIDS Conference in Bali
World Experts on Fighting AIDS Meeting in Bali.

More than 4,000 public health officials and HIV/AIDS activists from 65 countries are meeting from August 9 - 14, 2009 in Bali discussing how to provide better care to the growing number of victims in the Asia-Pacific region. Opened by Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, the International Congress on Aids in Asia and the Pacific (ICAAP) is the ninth such meeting of its kind.
Delegates at the Bali conference are seeking ways to ensure that all AIDS sufferers have access to critical antiretroviral treatments necessary to the prolongation of life for those affected with the disease. Current estimates are that only 25% of the estimated 1.7 million people in the Asia-Pacific region requiring the medication have access to free antiretroviral treatments. Throughout the Asia-Pacific region an estimated 5 million people are afflicted with HIV/AIDS, claiming 380,000 lives in 2008.
The number of HIV/AIDS cases in Indonesia have tripled since 2005, with prisoners, prostitutes and intravenous drug users considered the groups most at risk.


Car Free Sundays in Downtown Denpasar
Sections of Bali's Capital City of Denpasar to be Closed to Motorized Traffic Every Sunday.

Bisnis Bali reports that Bali's capital city of Denpasar is taking a number of steps to reduce air pollution in Bali.
Among the steps promised by the Denpasar city administration are special roadways for vehicles and the introduction of "Car Free Days"
Car Free Days
To get the "Car Free Day" program underway, officials will close all traffic in the roads surrounding Lapangan Puputan Badung on Sunday, August 16, 2009. According to The Jakarta Post the roads that will be closed to motorized vehicles on Sundays will be:
• Jalan Raya Puputan
• Jalan Cut Nyak Dien
• Jalan Basuki Rakmat
• Jalan Juanda
Planned to become a regular fixture on every Sunday, Bali residents will be able to use the once busy roadways for strolling, jogging, cycling and other recrations
To celebrate to start of "Car Free Days" city oficials will launch a special bicycle rally on August 15th and organize an open stage with live bands to entertain the public on August 16th.
Depending on the public's response to the program, city officials say the number of streets closed to vehicle traffic may be expanded over time.


 
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Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
December 17, 2007

Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
November 05, 2007

Bali Update #581
October 29, 2007

Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
October 15, 2007

Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
September 10, 2007

Bali Update #573
September 03, 2007

Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
August 20, 2007

Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006

Bali Update #500
April 10, 2006

Bali Update #499
April 03, 2006

Bali Update #498
March 27, 2006

Bali Update #497
March 20, 2006

Bali Update #496
March 13, 2006

Bali Update #495
March 06, 2006

Bali Update #494
February 27, 2006

Bali Update #493
February 20, 2006

Bali Update #492
February 13, 2006

Bali Update #491
February 06, 2006

Bali Update #490
January 30, 2006

Bali Update #489
January 23, 2006

Bali Update #488
January 16, 2006

Bali Update #487
January 09, 2006

Bali Update #486
January 02, 2006

Bali Update #485
December 26, 2005

Bali Update #484
December 19, 2005

Bali Update #482
December 12, 2005

Bali Update #481
December 05, 2005

Bali Update #481
November 28, 2005

Bali Update #480
November 21, 2005

Bali Update #479
November 14, 2005

Bali Update #478
November 07, 2005

Bali Update #477
October 31, 2005

Bali Update #476
October 24, 2005

Bali Update #475
October 17, 2005

Bali Update #474
October 10, 2005

Bali Update #473
October 03, 2005

Bali Update #472
September 26, 2005

Bali Update #471
September 19, 2005

Bali Update #470
September 12, 2005

Bali Update #469
September 05, 2005

Bali Update #468
August 29, 2005

Bali Update #467
August 22, 2005

Bali Update #466
August 15, 2005

Bali Update #465
August 08, 2005

Bali Update #464
August 01, 2005

Bali Update #463
July 25, 2005

Bali Update #462
July 18, 2005

Bali Update #461
July 11, 2005

Bali Update #460
July 04, 2005

Bali Update #459
June 27, 2005

Bali Update #458
June 20, 2005

Bali Update #457
June 13, 2005

Bali Update #456
June 06, 2005

Bali Update #455
May 30, 2005

Bali Update #454
May 23, 2005

Bali Update #453
May 16, 2005

Bali Update #452
May 09, 2005

Bali Update #451
May 02, 2005

Bali Update #450
April 25, 2005

Bali Update #449
April 18, 2005

Bali Update #448
April 11, 2005

Bali Update #447
April 04, 2005

Bali Update #446
March 28, 2005

Bali Update #445
March 21, 2005

Bali Update #444
March 14, 2005

Bali Update #443
March 07, 2005

Bali Update #442
February 28, 2005

Bali Update #441
February 21, 2005

Bali Update #440
February 14, 2005

Bali Update #439
February 07, 2005

Bali Update #438
January 31, 2005

Bali Update #437
January 24, 2005

Bali Update #436
January 17, 2005

Bali Update #435
January 10, 2005

Bali Update #434
January 03, 2005

Bali Update #433
December 27, 2004

Bali Update #432
December 20, 2004

Bali Update #431
December 13, 2004

Bali Update #430
December 06, 2004

Bali Update #429
November 29, 2004

Bali Update #428
November 22, 2004

Bali Update #427
November 15, 2004

Bali Update #426
November 08, 2004

Bali Update #425
November 01, 2004

Bali Update #424
October 25, 2004

Bali Update #423
October 18, 2004

Bali Update #422
October 11, 2004

Bali Update #421
October 04, 2004

Bali Update #420
September 27, 2004

Bali Update #419
September 20, 2004

Bali Update #418
September 13, 2004

Bali Update #417
September 06, 2004

Bali Update #416
August 30, 2004

Bali Update #415
August 23, 2004

Bali Update #414
August 16, 2004

Bali Update #413
August 09, 2004

Bali Update #412
August 02, 2004

Bali Update #411
July 26, 2004

Bali Update #410
July 19, 2004

Bali Update #409
July 12, 2004

Bali Update #408
July 05, 2004

Bali Update #407
June 28, 2004

Bali Update #406
June 21, 2004

Bali Update #405
June 14, 2004

Bali Update #404
June 07, 2004

Bali Update #403
May 31, 2004

Bali Update #402
May 24, 2004

Bali Update #401
May 17, 2004

Bali Update #400
May 10, 2004

Bali Update #399
May 03, 2004

Bali Update #398
April 26, 2004

Bali Update #397
April 19, 2004

Bali Update #396
April 12, 2004

Bali Update #395
April 05, 2004

Bali Update #394
March 29, 2004

Bali Update #393
March 22, 2004

Bali Update #392
March 15, 2004

Bali Update #391
March 08, 2004

Bali Update #390
March 01, 2004

Bali Update #389
February 23, 2004

Bali Update #388
February 16, 2004

Bali Update #387
February 09, 2004

Bali Update #386
February 02, 2004

Bali Update #385
January 26, 2004

Bali Update #384
January 19, 2004

Bali Update #383
January 12, 2004

Bali Update #382
January 05, 2004

Bali Update #381
December 29, 2003

Bali Update #380
December 22, 2003

Bali Update #379
December 15, 2003

Bali Update #378
December 08, 2003

Bali Update #377
December 01, 2003

Bali Update #376
November 24, 2003

Bali Update #375
November 17, 2003

Bali Update #374
November 10, 2003

Bali Update #373
November 03, 2003

Bali Update #372
October 27, 2003

Bali Update #371
October 20, 2003

Bali Update #370
October 13, 2003

Bali Update #369
October 06, 2003

Bali Update #368
September 29, 2003

Bali Update #367
September 22, 2003

Bali Update #366
September 15, 2003

Bali Update #365
September 08, 2003

Bali Update #364
September 01, 2003

Bali Update #363
August 25, 2003

Bali Update #362
August 18, 2003

Bali Update #361
August 11, 2003

Bali Update #360
August 04, 2003

Bali Update #359
July 28, 2003

Bali Update #358
July 21, 2003

Bali Update #357
July 14, 2003

Bali Update #356
July 07, 2003

Bali Update #355
June 30, 2003

Bali Update #354
June 23, 2003

Bali Update #353
June 16, 2003

Bali Update #352
June 09, 2003

Bali Update #351
June 02, 2003

Bali Update #350
May 26, 2003

Bali Update #349
May 19, 2003

Bali Update #348
May 12, 2003

Bali Update #347
May 05, 2003

Bali Update #346
April 28, 2003

Bali Update #345
April 21, 2003

Bali Update #344
April 14, 2003

Bali Update #343
April 08, 2003

Bali Update #342
April 07, 2003

Bali Update #341
March 31, 2003

Bali Update #340
March 24, 2003

Bali Update #339
March 17, 2003

Bali Update #338
March 10, 2003

Bali Update #337
March 03, 2003

Bali Update #336
February 24, 2003

Bali Update #335
February 17, 2003

Bali Update #334
February 10, 2003

Bali Update #333
February 03, 2003

Bali Update #332
January 27, 2003

Bali Update #331
January 20, 2003

Bali Update #330
January 13, 2003

Bali Update #329
January 06, 2003

Bali Update #328
December 30, 2002

Bali Update #327
December 23, 2002

Bali Update #326
December 16, 2002

Bali Update #325
December 09, 2002

Bali Update #324
December 02, 2002

Bali Update #323
November 25, 2002

Bali Update #322
November 18, 2002

Bali Update #321
November 11, 2002

Bali Update #320
November 04, 2002

Bali Update #319
October 28, 2002

Bali Update #318
October 21, 2002

Bali Update #317
October 14, 2002

Bali Update #316
October 07, 2002

Bali Update #315
September 30, 2002

Bali Update #314
September 23, 2002

Bali Update #313
September 16, 2002

Bali Update #312
September 09, 2002

Bali Update #311
September 02, 2002

Bali Update #310
August 26, 2002

Bali Update #309
August 19, 2002

Bali Update #308
August 12, 2002

Bali Update #307
August 05, 2002

Bali Update #306
July 29, 2002

Bali Update #305
July 22, 2002

Bali Update #304
July 15, 2002

Bali Update #303
July 08, 2002

Bali Update #302
July 01, 2002

Bali Update #301
June 24, 2002

Bali Update #300
June 17, 2002

Bali Update #299
June 10, 2002

Bali Update #298
June 03, 2002

Bali Update #297
May 27, 2002

Bali Update #296
May 20, 2002

Bali Update #295
May 13, 2002

Bali Update #294
May 06, 2002

Bali Update #293
April 29, 2002

Bali Update #292
April 22, 2002

Bali Update #291
April 15, 2002

Bali Update #290
April 08, 2002

Bali Update #289
April 01, 2002

Bali Update #288
March 25, 2002

Bali Update #287
March 18, 2002

Bali Update #286
March 11, 2002

Bali Update #285
March 04, 2002

Bali Update #284
February 25, 2002

Bali Update #283
February 18, 2002

Bali Update #282
February 11, 2002

Bali Update #281
February 04, 2002

Bali Update #280
January 28, 2002

Bali Update #279
January 21, 2002

Bali Update #278
January 14, 2002

Bali Update #277
January 07, 2002

Bali Update #276
December 31, 2001

Bali Update #275
December 24, 2001

Bali Update #274
December 17, 2001

Bali Update #273
December 10, 2001

Bali Update #272
December 03, 2001

Bali Update #271
November 26, 2001

Bali Update #270
November 19, 2001

Bali Update #269
November 12, 2001

Bali Update #268
November 05, 2001

Bali Update #267
October 29, 2001

Bali Update #266
October 22, 2001

Bali Update #265
October 15, 2001

Bali Update #264
October 08, 2001

Bali Update #263
October 01, 2001

Bali Update #262
September 24, 2001

Bali Update #261
September 17, 2001

Bali Update #260
September 10, 2001

Bali Update #259
September 03, 2001

Bali Update #258
August 27, 2001

Bali Update #257
August 20, 2001

Bali Update #256
August 13, 2001

Bali Update #255
August 06, 2001

Bali Update #254
July 30, 2001
 

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