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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #685 - 26 October 2009

Joop Ave: Preserve the Environment
Preserving Culture and the Natural Environment Essential to Sustaining Bali’ Tourism Industry.

Quoted by the National News Agency Antara, former Minister of Tourism, Post and Telecommunications, Joop Ave, says the people must preserve the environment if the tourism sector is to be sustained.
Elaborating with specific emphasis on Bali, Ave said: "As well as protecting its culture, Indonesia must also guard its natural environment, especially on the island of Bali – all of which are the cornerstone of tourism."
Speaking at the opening of the Nusa Dua Fiesta 2009, Ave said that both domestic and international tourists travel to Bali to not only experience the island's culture but to also see its natural environment. The popular former minister in charge of Indonesia's tourism warned: "I hope the people of Bali can protect the natural environment, including the ocean's ecosystem. If these are destroyed (our) tourism will be abandoned by visitors."
Ave went on to praise the organizers of the Nusa Dua Fiesta 2009 for adopting "Green Tourism" and "Protecting the Oceans and Sea shores" as this year's theme for the event; signifying Nusa Dua's commitment to maintain Bali as a world class tourism destination. "This theme invites us to show our concern and preserve the ocean's ecosystem. The ocean eco-system of Bali is one of the major attractions of Bali's sea-based tourism," added Ave.
Continuing, Ave said, "tourists who snorkel or go diving in Bali are able to enjoy the biosphere of Bali's oceans." Saying God has bestowed the rich oceans surrounding island on Bali, this fact demands that we cooperate to safeguard and preserve our season."
Thinking locally and acting globally, Ave reminded: "The efforts to protect and preserve the coral reef can help slow the rate of global warning, because the ocean's ecosystem is able to absorb carbon dioxide."
The opening of the Nusa Dua Fiesta 2009 was attended by various government officials, including Joop Ave and former Culture and Tourism Minister I Gde Ardika who help place an artificial reef in the waters off Nusa Dua.
Related Article
[Nusa Dua Fiesta XIII 2009]


73 Rivers in Bali Have Run Dry
Bali's Piped Water Supply Under Threat as Farmers Idled by Deepening Water Crisis.

The prolonged dry season currently being experienced in Bali is having profound impact on the island's ecology. As reported by Bali Post, of the 165 rivers found on the island, 73 have now run dry. Of the remaining 92 river still flowing, most of these are doing so with substantially reduced flow rates. Many of the dried-up rivers are in West Buleleng, East Buleleng, Kubu and Seraya areas of Bali.
The Head of the Public Works Department for Bali, Ir. I Gusti Nyoman Sura Adnyana, M. Sc., said on Monday, October 19, 2009, the worst affected areas of Bali in the current water shortage are in mountainous regions, with water that is still available lying in lower elevations.
Overcoming the current water deficit won't be easy or happen overnight. Adnyana said plans are in hand to capture the overflow from Dam II of the Tukad Unda River and its estuaries, but such schemes are expensive.
Because of this, the Public Works Department is focusing on rivers close to the Badung and Gianyar regencies, and Denpasar. Rubber dams have been established on Tukad Penet River in the border areas between Badung and Tabanan. Plans are to take between 300-500 liters of water per second to help meet the tap water requirements of Denpasar and South Badung. The exploitation of the waters of the Tukad Penet river is being done on the downstream areas in order not to disrupt the traditional subak water distribution systems that feeds Bali's agricultural lands.
Meanwhile, the water deficit occurring in East Denpasar, Nusa Dua and parts of Gianyar will be addressed, at least in part, by a planed dam to be built in 2010 on the Tukad Petanu river projected to also provide between 300-500 liters of water per second.
Candi Dasa
Bali's drought-like conditions are also affecting the rivers in Bali's east, in the areas surrounding Candi Dasa. A member of the regional house of representatives (DPRRD-Karangasem), I Nyoman Sadra, B.A., reports that the watercourses in the area of Nyuh Tebel are now dry.
When the rivers still flowed in that region, the rice fields north of Candida were still productive, even in drought periods through reliance on the subak system and the employment of crop rotation techniques. However, now that the rivers have run dry, the rice fields have also gone dry yielding no agricultural crops.
Related Articles
[Bali's Worsening Water Crisis]
[Bali Hotels Asked to Begin Desalinating Seawater]
[Bali's Diminishing Water Supply]
[Bali's Lakes are Shrinking]


Eat, Pray, Love, and Pay
Bali Governor Pastika Angered by Villagers Coercing Additional 'Fees' from the Producers of 'Eat, Pray, Love.'

As reported by balidiscovery.com the commencement of filming of the major Hollywood film "Eat, Pray, Love" starring Julia Roberts and Javier Bardem got off to a less than smooth start as Balinese villagers demanded extra compensation to allow the film to proceed. [See: Julia Roberts Begins Filming in Bali]
Radar Bali reports that Bali's governor, Made Mangku Pastika, was not pleased with what appears to be coercive efforts to extract additional fees from Sony Picture/Columbia Pictures.
The governor told the press that the villagers' opportunistic behavior was embarrassing for the people of Bali and not in keeping with the many honors and accolades earned by the island known as a "paradise on earth."
According to governor Pastika, a central theme of the film depicts Bali as "an island of love." As indicated by the title, its main character portrayed by Julia Roberts explores the pleasure of eating in Italy; the serenity of prayer in India, and the joys of love in Bali. Speaking from him home on October 18, 2009, Pastika said: "Love in Bali is a new branding joining earlier citations, such as the island of paradise, the island of the gods, and the island of peace and democracy. How beautiful is Bali and love sowed in Bali. This is proven by the increasing number of people who have their weddings performed in Bali."
In this context, Pastika hopes that all parties in Bali, including its elders and leaders, take the necessary steps to preserve this reputation. Admitting that waves of change, both good and bad, were sweeping over the island, he added, "(the changes) must be anticipated so that Bali's good reputation is preserved."
Strong Words of Criticism
Viewing both the positive and negative forces at play on the island, Pastika has also seen the impact being made on the character of the Balinese people and the resulting trends of commercialism and consumerism. One proof cited by the Governor, was the case of the villagers asking for hundreds of millions of rupiah from the makers of the "Eat, Pray, Love, film. Making his point in the strongest possible terms, Pastika said: "To the extent that they asked for hundreds of millions of rupiah - using tradition, culture and religion as the foundation for their demands, I deeply regret that this condition has invaded into the character of the people of Bali. This is one more rapid change (in our society) with a negative effect on our people."
Moreover, Pastika said such behavior he found embarrassing as the news of the villagers behavior will be publicized the world over. Pastika continued: "When I heard this I was ashamed. How can a traditional village ask for hundreds of millions (of rupiah)? This film will be seen by the world, indirectly also showing Bali to the world."
Shortly after the villagers of Bentuyung village demanded Rp. 200 million (US$ 20,000) from the filmmakers, the villagers of Pengosekan – another location in the film, have followed suit and are now requesting compensation.


Insubordination Among Indonesia's Tourism Cadres?
Tourism Industry Leaders Express Concerns Regarding Culture and Tourism Minister Wacik's Ability to Head Indonesian Tourism.

Prior to the recent reappointment of Jero Wacik as Minister of Culture and Tourism Minister by President Yudhoyono, a number of tourism leaders expressed their reservations over the Bali politician's suitability for the top tourism post.
A report in Bisnis.com quotes the Vice-Chairman of the Jakarta Chapter of the Association of Travel Agents (ASITA), Rudiana, saying: "if (he) is to be given a second term everyone, particularly those in the tourism industry, should have (already) witnessed his past extraordinary job performance. Can someone who resigned before his first term finished be considered as having a high commitment to the job?"
Rudiana was referring to Wacik's resignation as Minister of Culture and Tourism in late September in order to ensure a "certain" seat as a lawmaker against the then "still uncertain" second term in the Presidential cabinet. [See: Tourism Minister Wacik Resigns]
Rudiana had hoped President Yudhoyono would reconsider his plans to reappoint Wacik. Rudiana said Jero Wacik's behavior had shown that the job of minister was only seen as of political importance. The problems surrounding culture and tourism, were, in the view of the ASITA official, only of symbolic value to meet political ends; with little serious consideration to advance national tourism.
Accusing Minister Wacik of a lack of even-handedness in administering national tourism, Rudiana added: "The character and the programs of the past are wrong in having favored the development of Bali's tourism. Tourism objects in other parts of the archipelago have not received the serious handling and attention they deserve."
Meanwhile, other elements of the tourism industry point to the unfinished "homework" by Jero Wacik in his perceived failure to create a tourism promotion strategy and an integrated approach to tourism service involving other relevant ministries of the government.
"To facilitate this, something resembling the Indonesian Tourism Promotion Board (BPPI) needs to be reformed and reinvigorated while, at the same time, repairing the financial bureaucracy to allow private an public sector membership in a body intended to increase a coordinated level of tourism promotion," explained Herry Setiawan, a Director of Aerojasa Perkasa and Garuda Indonesian Holidays.
Separately, the former Chairman of the BPPI, Wuryastuti Sunario, was quoted as considering Jero Wacik as less than capable of fostering cooperation with the private sector and the press. This is unfortunate, according to Sunario, as the tourism industry and the press are equal partners who must be fully engaged in executing national tourism programs.
Wuryastuti stated: "Cooperation with the private sector should not be equated with merely giving money in support of private sector initiatives. Don't treat the private sector as a sub-contractor, but create a genuine partnership instead."
A leader in Indonesia's communication sector, Aselina Endang Trihastui, judged that the Minister of Culture and Tourism has thus far failed to fully utilize a professional organization capable of assisting in creating an Indonesian tourism image.


Bali Weather Warning
Local Weather Officials Warn Bali to Be Prepared for Water and Ocean Spouts Over Coming Weeks.

The Bali office of the Meteorology and Geophysics Agency (BMG) have warned that Bali's current weather conditions are ripe for the production of angin puting beliung - water and land spouts resembling small scale tornadoes.
Kompas.com quotes Made Wijendra, a meteorologist at Denpasar's BMG office, saying: "the increased air temperature caused by the Sun's position directly over Bali increase the potential of local showers and angin puting beliung. "
Wijendra explained that the sun's concentration over Bali's latitude will last through early November as the sun moves towards its "summertime" position above the southern hemisphere. During the sun's transition period, daily temperatures in Bali will get as high a 33-34 degrees Celsius.
The high temperatures in combination with the cumulonimbus clouds that bring local rains can produce localized tornadoes or whirlwinds, known locally as angin puting beliung.
In recent years this weather phenomenon have threatened local shipping and caused damage to structures in coastal areas of Bali.
Bali residents should be aware of this weather threat, seeking immediate cover in an inner room of the strongest available structure. To those caught in the path of a puting beliung. The high winds connected to these wind spouts are a threat to life and property and the public should take all necessary precautions when encountering such weather.


Bali Bank Branched Robbed by Armed Thugs
Criminality Cranks Up a Notch in Bali A Local BRI Branch Hit by Bank Robbers Stealing US$29,000 in Broad Daylight.

Bali's criminal elements are getting bolder, a fact demonstrated last week when on Friday, October 23, 2009, when bank robbers conducted a daytime heist at the West Gatot Subroto Branch of the Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI),
The first armed robbery of a bank in recent memory in Bali, five thieves entered the bank at approximately 2:45 p.m. where they tied the hands and gagged the mouths of the bank's four employees.
According to local press reports, the bank was preparing to close for the day when two neatly dressed men who entered the premises, posing as bank customers. A short time later, two men who arrived in a silver-colored Xenia arrived at the bank, joining the two who had arrived earlier.
Either by coincidence or as part of their plan, the electricity to the bank suddenly failed rendering the bank's CCTV cameras non-operational. What followed was also made easier for the criminals by the fact that no bank guard is assigned at the bank branch.
The robbers quickly set about their work. A knife was directed at one of the bank's employees and the robbers tied-up and gagged the entire staff, warning all: "If you scream, it means you're ready to die."
Police theorize that five people were involved in the robbery, with the fifth standing by as a driver outside the bank.
The thieves made off with an estimated Rp. 290 million (US$29,000) and one laptop computer worth Rp. 5 million (US$500).
Police continue to investigate the case.


To Catch a Thief
Practical Tips on How to Avoid Thieves Conducting Rash of 'Snatch & Run' Attacks on Bali Bank Customers.

A wave of snatch and run robberies targeted on people who have just taken large sums of cash from a bank, has prompted the Bali police to call on the public to be extremely careful when carrying large sums of money, taking precautionary steps to prevent future robberies.
The modus operandi of those preying on bank customers entails observing customers withdrawing large sums and then following them from the bank to a location where the tires of the victim's vehicle can be punctured, setting the stage for the thieves to snatch the money just taken from the bank.
We hope the following information, gathered from police sources, is of use.
Modus Operandi of Tire Puncture Gangs
• The robbers typically work as a pair, traveling on a motorcycle.
• One of the group will observe customers at local banks and money changers to identify a potential victim.
• The robbers use special hollow nails to puncture tires.
• They typically plant their nail at a traffic light.
• Using a rubber sandal to camouflage the nail, the nail is typically laid in front of one of the rear tires of the victim's vehicle.
• There appears to be a preference for puncturing the rear left tire, perhaps because their activities are less easily observed by the driver.
• Victims who place large amounts of money from the bank in a handbag are preferred targets.
Preventative Steps You Can Take
Here's a brief list of steps you can take to protect yourself:
• Whenever possible, make payments of large amounts by crossed check or bank transfer.
• Ask the police or a security guard (SATPAM) to accompany you when carrying large sums of money.
• Pay attention to pedestrians or motorcyclists who approach the left back corner of your vehicle at a stop light.
• If your tire suddenly does flat, stop at a busy area or pull in to the parking area of a local company. Yes, if needed, you can drive on the rim for several kilometers.
• If you get out of your car to change the tire, lock the doors and weigh whether it is better to bring the money with you.
• Always be aware of the situation surrounding you and don't hesitate to ask assistance from local people.
• In Indonesian the word to scream for "thief" in order to raise an alarm is "maling" (pronounced : mall – ing).


The First 100 Days of Minister Wacik's New Term.
Minister of Culture and Tourism Pledges to Reduce Long Lines at Visa Counters and Brings More Direct Flights to Indonesia.

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has asked each of the ministers seated in his newly appointed cabinet to assist him in his second term as the Country's Chief Executive to set goal for their first 100 days in office.
Jero Wacik, the man reappointed to head the Culture and Tourism Ministry recently outlined what he plans to achieve in his first 100 days.
Shorter Visa Lines
Wacik has pledged to shorten the lines for tourists purchasing the visa-on-arrival at the Nation's airports. Wacik told the press: "Our visa service takes too long and the lines are too long. The process has to be simplified." To achieve this he has promised to meet urgently with the Justice and Human Rights Ministry (Depkum HAM) to discuss way to keep his promise of a simpler, faster visa process.
More Flights to Indonesia
Wacik also declared as one of the goals for his first 100 day in the new administration to increase the number of direct flights to Indonesia from Australian, China, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Japan, the Middle East and Europe.


Think on These Things
Bali to Host International Bali Meditators Festival November 14-15, 2009.

Ubud's growing role as a strong draw for international conferences is once again revealed by plans to host the First Annual International Bali Meditators Festival at the Astina Field in Ubud, November 14-15, 2009.
Initiated by Indonesian author, educator and spiritual leader Anand Krishna, the Bali gathering will explore the central role meditation plays in all the world great faiths and religions. As part of its mission and vision, the Bali festival seeks to promote a meditative way of life in order to:
• Create an enlightened society.
• Exchange information, experiences, knowledge and cross-cultural understanding in the area of meditation.
• Create international networks and partnerships in the area of meditation.
• To raise public awareness.
Centered at the very hear of Ubud, the festival will present keynote addresses, panels, workshops, devotions and special performances.
Among the potential speakers expected to attend are:
• Anand Krishna (Founder of Anand Ashram Foundation)
• Merta Ada (Chairperson of Bali Usada)
• Gede Prama
• L.K. Suryani (Founder of Suryani Institute of Mental Health)
• Prabhu Darmayasa (Founder of Center Meditasi Angka)
• Ratu Bagus (Founder of Ratu Bagus Ashram/ Bio-energy Meditation)
• Ida Pedanda Gede Made Gunung
• Paul Whitehead (from Paramahansa Yogananda organization)
• Margot Anand (Founder of Sky Dancing Institutes)
For more information and on-line registration: [International Bali Meditators Festival]


Who's the Largest User of Precious Subterrain Water Resource?
Despite Government Warnings to Avoid Tapping Bali's Diminishing Underground Water Reservoirs, PDAM Bali is the Largest Exploiter of Bali's Subterrain Water Sources.

Despite repeated warnings from the government to conserve Subterrain water reservoirs in Bal, the Bali Post reports that the State Water Board (PDAM) has little hesitation to tap into Bali's diminishing underground water reserves. According to the report, in every municipality and regency of Bali, PDAM derives more water from Subterrain reservoirs than it does from surface sources. This approach offers several advantages, including less competition with farmers for water from rivers and streams and the reduced cost of tapping into Subterrain sources that requires less treatment than the more polluted water in Bali's rivers and streams.
The Director of PDAM-Bali, Ir. Putu Gede Mahaputra, admitted to the press that the diminishing supplies of above ground water and the heavily polluted nature of those water sources made tapping into the water table a necessity.
PDAM-Denpasar currently serves 66.189 customers who consumer a total of 2.4 million cubic meters of water each month. 6.067 consumers are on PDAM's waiting-list for a hook-up to the water mains.
Mahaputra said that in August 2009 PDAM consumed 1.021 million cubic meters of well water, equivalent to 398.62 liters per second. The water board has 18 working wells. Meanwhile, above ground water constituted 1.99 million cubic meters of water drawn from the Ayung river and the Waribang pumping station. PDAM-Denpasar also purchases water from third parties, such as PDAM-Gianyar, PDAM Badung and a private company PT Tirta Buanamulia. The total amount of water purchased from third parties equals 3.1 million cubic meters each month, equal to 1,219 liters per second.
A Similar Situation in Jembrana
Substantial tapping into underground water sources is also done by PDAM-Jembrana who make a case for necessity to avoid competing with farmers over above-ground water sources. In the past year, PDAM-Jembrana has added two additional pumping stations to meet water demand.
In Bali's most populace region of Badung, Subterrain water reservoirs are also put under strain by more than 420 registered companies using well water taken from private wells. Many of these companies are hotels, villas, restaurants, apartments and other businesses located along Kuta beach. Meanwhile, in the Abiansemal, Mengwi and Petang areas of Bali the biggest users of Subterrain water are PDAM-Badung and beverage producers.
Related Articles
[Bali's Worsening Water Crisis]
[Bali Hotels Asked to Begin Desalinating Seawater]
[Bali's Diminishing Water Supply]
[Bali's Lakes are Shrinking]
[73 Rivers in Bali Have Run Dry]


No Ugly Ducklings in this Pond
Bali-based Swimmer Monte Monfore Thinks 'Getting in Over His Head' and 'Jumping in the Deep End' are the Best Ways to Help People.

Bali-based humanitarian swimmer, Monte Monfore, and Australian swim instructor, Glenn Schapel, recently teamed up for the second time to organize an annual Kid's Day at the Pool for Physically and Mentally Challenged Children. This year's fun fest was kindly hosted by Holiday Inn Resort Baruna Bali in South Kuta. 15 children from the Foundation or Handicapped Children (YPAC) were treated to a day of swimming, splashing, fun and games at the luxury hotel's beachside pool. Following the swim, the resort treated the kids to lunch at their popular Palms Restaurant.
"I jumped at the chance when Glenn proposed this last year," said California swimmer Monte. "I can't tell you how fun this is! It's extremely gratifying to see the children's smiling and happy faces. We're very appreciative of Holiday Inn for hosting this year's event. I want to thank the General Manager, Stephane, and Activities Director, Mukti, for all their support."
The Resort's General Manager, Stephane Varoquier, said: "We're very pleased to host this wonderful event to brighten the day for these special children. Holiday Inn Resort Baruna Bali is committed to supporting the Balinese community and improving the lives of the locals. We'd love to do this with Monte and Glenn and the children again sometime."
"I've been teaching swimming for more than half my life," said Glenn, who was on holiday in Bali from Adelaide, Australia. "It's especially fulfilling to work with challenged children in the pool. I'm happy to team up with Monte and spend time with these kids while I'm in Bali and look forward to doing it again next year."
Hotel guests were invited to join in the fun and several participated by helping with the children in the pool. "This was one of the highlights of our trip," said John and Becky Livingston from Melbourne, Australia. "It was really fun helping and seeing the smiling faces on these kids.
Tanti, a supervisor from YPAC, added: "We are very thankful to Monte and Glenn and Holiday Inn. The children have so much fun and really enjoy this day. This is all they talk about weeks before and after the event and we can wait to do it again next year."
YPAC
Jimbaran-based YPAC is a non-denominational children's home for mentally and physically challenged youth. Their mission is to integrate the children to lead normal lives in society. The institute receives governmental funding, but additional fund helps to purchase artificial limbs, wheelchairs, clothes, bedding, cleaning, cooking, and school supplies. A new bathroom expansion project to accommodate wheelchairs and people with prosthetic limbs is waiting for funding.
Monet Monfore
Monte Monfore is a Bali-based American long distance swimmer who works tirelessly in bringing attention and raising funds on behalf of the fight against world hunger, poverty and pollution.
Monte Monfore made a commitment to bring positive, international media exposure to the island of Bali with his ocean swimming. Since 2004, Monte's swim events have supported tsunami victims, Yogyakarta earthquake victims, hungry children and the poor, and promoted children's education, ocean conservation, the protection of marine animals, and the fight against climate change and global warming. His swimming supports the United Nations, UNICEF, UNDP, World Food Program, Millennium Campaign, Greenpeace and WWF initiatives. The swimmer recently orchestrated a UNICEF and Circle K partnership and is working on a project to assist raising $2.5 million for a nationwide polio immunization campaign to protect Indonesian children. Monte's swimming also supports three children's homes in Bali, including one for mentally and physically challenged youths.
Related Articles
[Monte Makes a Beachhead at Nusa Dua]
[Merdeka - One Stroke at a Time!]
[Sink or Swim - Monte Fights Child Hunger]
[High Altitude Swim for Peace in Lake Batur]
[Stroking Monte]
[Monte Sets Records and Fights Child Hunger]
[The Full Monte]


Ayana Resort to Hosts Antinori Wine Evening November 7, 2009.
600 Years and 26 Generations of Wine Making Expertise from Antinori Wines on Display at Ayana Resort Bali's Wine Dinner.

Renowned Tuscan and Umbrian wine makers since 1385, the Antinori family now counts 26 generations of distinguished wine makers carrying on the tradition of their founding patriarch Giovanni di Piero Antinori.
Today, Marchese Piero Antinori leads the family business together with his three daughters - Albiera, Allegra and Alessia; all fiercely committed to preserving a family name that has become synonymous with fine quality Italian wine.
Over their more than 600 year history, the Antinori family have created a wine making empire under the A dal Mondo banner that exploits the diverse terroirs available in Italy, California (USA), Washington State (USA), Hungary, Chile and Malta. Antinori continually experiment with their vineyards and cellars, with selections of native and international clones, growing methods, vineyard altitudes, fermentation methods and temperatures, traditional and modern vinification techniques, types of wood, size and age of barrels, and various bottle-ageing periods.
On Saturday, November 7, 2009, the Export Manager of Antinori, Jacopo Pandolfini, will be on hand to help guide a select and privileged group of diners at the Ayana Resort's Dava Restaurant through pre-dinner cocktails and a five-course tasting menu prepared by Chef William Gumport paired with 5 Antinori vintages.
The evening begins at 7:00 p.m. with pre-dinner cocktails at the River Pool next to Dava, Ayana's signature-fine dining restaurant.
Seating is strictly limited and reservations are essential by calling +62-(0)361-702222 at a cost of Rp. 1 million plus 21% tax and service (US$121) per person. Costs covers cocktails, the five-course dinner and paired Antinori Wines.
The Menu - Antinori Wine Evening
CANAPES
Bali heirloom tomato bruschetta
citrus cured kingfish
brochette of waygu beef

Montenisa Brut Franciacorta DOCG, NV
* * *
poached mackerel, arugula, marinated peppers Mediterranean sauce
Villa Antinori Bianco Toscana IGT, 2007
* * *
mushroom risotto, chicken essence, parmesan cream, garlic chive
Villa Antinori Rosso Toscana IGT, 2005
* * *
rosemary roasted lamb loin, spiced lamb stuffed zucchini flower, crispy polenta, eggplant compote, lamb jus
Marchesa Antinori Chianti Classico DOCG Riserva, 2004
* * *
selection of Italian cheeses and dried fruits
Prunotto Barolo Bussia, 2004
* * *
coffee tart, Bali tropical fruits, steamed meringue, and cocoa nib tuile
selection of coffee and teas

Book a stay at [Ayana Resort and Spa, Bali]


Bali: No Island for Old Men
Age Discrimination in Reverse as Hollywood Casting Directors Search Bali for Really Old Guy to Become Julia Robert's Holy Man in 'Eat, Pray, Love.'

World on the street is that casting directors are combing Indonesia in desperate search for a senior Indonesian actor or film newcomer to play the part of Ketut Liyer in the major Hollywood production "Eat, Pray, Love" starring Julia Roberts and now being shot in Bali.
Ketut Liyer, a famous medicine man who lives in downtown Ubud, plays a central role advising Ms. Robert's character in the story that travels from the U.S.A. to Italy to India to Bali.
In order to approximate the real-life character, the filmmakers are looking for a male Indonesian actor, more than 70 years of age and able to say his lines an take direction in English.
Beritabali.com reports that those casting the role have traveled to Jakarta, Bandung, Yogya and Bali in search of a man to fill the role. Those tested have included former Ambassadors, former oil-patch executives and leading Indonesian screen actors. Among the Indonesian actors said to have read for the role are Slamet Rahardjo, Hengky Sulaeman, Him Damsyik and Piet Burnama. And, while some of these actors are still under active consideration for the role, Director Ryan Murphy has ordered the casting search to continue.
While the film industry typically dotes on the "young and beautiful" the continuing Bali search for the "old and haggered" is seeing actors being turned away for being too young.


2009 Rotary Club Nusa Dua Charity Golf Tournament
Prizes and Awards Galore at Bali Golf & Country Club Tournament on October 31, 2009 in Support of Rotary Club Nusa Dua Cleft Lip Program.

Rotary Club Nusa Dua is holding the 2009 Rotary Club Nusa Dua Charity Golf Tournament at the Bal Golf & Country Club on Saturday, October 31, 2009.
A few entry spots remains on a "first-come-first-served" basis for an afternoon of great golf concluding with a delicious awards dinner.
The shotgun start is at 1:00 p.m. with sponsored goodies on every whole plus unique trophies and prizes for best gross, best gross runner up, best gross senior, best net, best net runner up, best net senior, best gross ladies, best net ladies. There are also prizes for long drives, nearest the line and nearest the pin. Not enough? Then consider Hole-in-One prizes of a round trip ticket to Nagoya on hole #6 and a vehicle for anyone managing to ace hole #15.
Among the door prizes to be given away are:
• 2 round trio tickets Denpasar – Shanghai – Denpasar sponsored by Garuda Indonesia.
• 2 nights stay at the Grand Hyatt Shanghai
• 2 nights stay at Hyatt on The Bund, Shanghai.
• 2 x 3 rounds of Golf at the Yianma Country Club.
Entry fee which covers a box lunch, the round of golf and a poolside BBQ awards dinner is only Rp. 1,250,000 (US$125) or Rp. 250,000 (US$25) for attendance at only the award's dinner.
Proceeds from the tournament will support the Rotary Club Nusa Dua's Cleft Lip Program.
For bookings a more information call:
• Ms. Dee Rai Viany at ++62-(0)361-771791 (extension 104) or Ms. Komang Puspa at ++62(0)361-77791 (extension 105).


 
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