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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #709 - 12 April 2010

Bali's Lord of the Ring
WBA Featherweight Champion Chris John to Fight Fernando David Saucedo in Bali on May 22, 2010.

World Boxing Association (WBA) featherweight champion Chris John will fight with a homeboy advantage when he steps into the ring in Bali to fight Argentinean Fernando David Saucedo on Kuta Beach of May 22, 2010.

Indonesian fight promoter Zaenal Thayeb is hoping to draw a large crowd with a large contingent of VVIP ticket holders needed to cover the cost of promoting an international standard boxing match in Indonesia.

Thayeb told the Bali Post that 70% of the necessary preparations are in hand. Fernando David Saucedo will be paid US$35,000 with Chris Johns receiving a purse far below what he was recently paid for his recent title defence in the United States.

The main event is scheduled to go for 12 rounds.

29-year-old Saucedo is currently ranked number 15 in the featherweight division of the WBA. Known by his fighting alias of "El Vasco," the Argentinean has fought 45 times, won 38 fights, suffered 4 defeats and fought to a tie 3 times. Among his 38 wins, only 4 bouts ended in a knockout.

Indonesian world champ and fighting sensation Chris Johns has yet to suffer a loss in his 45 bouts, fighting to draw on only two occasions. From among Johns' 43 wins, 22 ended with the Indonesian fighter knocking out his opponents.

The venue for the fight will be the Discovery Mall in South Kuta.


Louts, Bogans and Yobbos Not Welcome in Bali
Badly Behaving Ozzie Tourists in Bali an Embarrassment to Expat Australian Business Council Members.

According to an article in The West Australian, the Australian-Indonesia Business Council warns that the current upsurge in Australian tourists is being "marred by drunken bogans."

For those unfamiliar with Australian and New Zealand slang, a bogan is a pejorative term used to describe a crude, uneducated and badly behaved member of the lower social economic classes.

Angela Pownall writing for The West Australian quotes Ross Taylor, the National vice-president of the Australia-Indonesia Business Council (AIBC) as blaming cheap flights, a strong Australian dollar and the lull in terrorism as feeding the surge in Australian tourism to Bali. Concomitant with the larger number of Australian visitors visiting Bali over the past 18 months is, according to Taylor, an increase in anti-social behaviour.

"It's disappointing to see the few that really give Australians a bad name, with loud, drunken and aggressive behaviour," he said.

Australian tourists have displaced the Japanese, becoming the largest source of foreign visitors to Bali, producing 446,042 tourists to the island in 2009, an increase of 45.43% over arrivals in 2008. The boom in tourist has been aided by a strengthening in the Australian dollar over the past five years increasing its values from Rp. 5,500 to Rp. 8,500 over the same period.

For many Australian visitors, Bali is seen almost as a domestic destination, only 3 hours away from Perth via more than 54 flights connecting Western Australia and Bali every week.

"There is no place for drunken yobbos in Bali," says Taylor, urging people to remember that Bali is a gracious and religious society.


Playing with the Ancestors
Ganesha Gallery Bali Exhibition of Sculptures by Kamto Widjaya Lindu Prasekti May 7-21, 2010.

Sculptor, inventor, architect and eccentric are all labels that apply to Kamto Widjaya Lindu Prasekti. One label, however, that would never apply in connection with this Javanese artist is "average." When quizzed about his life's journey, he jokingly suggests he was probably better prepared to become a criminal. That was perhaps the fear shared by Lindu's father, a marine officer, who no doubt saw a never ending series of childhood naughty escapades committed by his son as cause for concern.

By 1988, when 20 years old, he entered the Yogyakarta university to study chemistry. A bohemian rebel by nature, yet Lindu was clearly not headed for the chain gang. He switched schools and disciplines and, in the end, like many university graduates in Indonesia, was forced to turn to an alternative livelihood, in this case, a job with a local cottage bamboo and metalworking industry.

Unexpected fortune opened new doors in an otherwise restless heart. The young chemist discovered that holding tools in his hands and creating material objects brought a special sense of satisfaction.

In 1996, he was able to travel to Osaka, Japan where he worked as a draughtsman. Back in Yogyakarta in 1999, in the wake of the Asian financial crisis, he had saved enough capital to buy land on the outskirts of Yogyakarta and open the Jagad Gallery, at a time when the business in antique furniture, buildings and Javanese folk art was booming.

Over time, the antique trade thinned, leaving Lindu to turn his attentions to the large amount of leftover bits and pieces - odds and ends from old doors, furniture, chairs, ploughs, tools and architectural elements as well as many old forged iron tools scythes, shovels, hoes and hammers – that had accumulated in his warehouse. These items provoked his very active imagination and in his odd free hours he begins making totem-like creatures and totems for his personal amusement. They also puzzled and amused others as well.

Ultimately there are only two types of sculptors in the world – either those like Michelangelo who hew their creations from a solid piece of stone or wood or those from the constructionist school, to which Lindu belongs. Dealing with the confusion of the post-industrial era, Lindu is most concerned with transforming the junk he already has into magical objects than shaping mountains. In a playful homage to his ancestors, he presents his tinkering with no pretensions or expectations.

Welcome to the show.

Playing with the Ancestors

Sculptures by Kamto Widjaya Lindu Prasekti

Ganesha Gallery at the Four Seasons Resort at Jimbaran Bay

Open Daily 9:00 am – 6:00 pm May 7 – 31, 2010


Bali: Where Beauty Takes a Holiday
Seven West Australian Finalists in Miss Universe Contest Pause and Refresh in Bali.

Beauty is as Beauty does or so it seems with the recent visit of West Australian Miss Universe finalists who paused at Bali's famous Ayana Resort.The seven beauties emerged from a field of twenty-one Miss Universe Western Australian finalists who competed in jeans, swimwear and formal evening gowns on March 5th at Burswood Park, W.A..

Hosted to a Bali interlude by Australian businessman, Troy Barbagallo, the seven finalists lazed at the Ayana Resort's Aquatonic Seawater Therapy Pool and enjoyed sunset cocktails at the Rock Bar.

The seven Western Australian stars - Alana Wilkie, Asher Crawford, Casey Leigh Magatelli, Lia Tapper, Megan Meares, Renae Wauhop and Stephanie Whife are now preparing for the national finals to be held in Sydney in June. After that, the woman deemed Australia's finest will be heading to the Miss Universe finals set for August where ladies from eighty countries and the ultimate winner will be crowned by the reigning Miss Universe, Stefania Fernández of Venezuela.

Shown on Balidisocvery.com are the finalists and Mr. Barbagallo relaxing in the Seawater Therapy Pool.

Book a stay at [Ayana Resort and Spa Bali]


Splish Splash, I was Taking a Bali Holiday
Melia Bali to Offer Highest Number Of Lagoon Access Suites In Bali.

Meliã Bali is augmenting its already excellent amenities, well-appointed surroundings and outstanding service by embarking on its new Lagoon Access Suites project. Worked commenced on March 1st and is expected to be finished in the third quarter of the year. When completed, Meliã Bali will provide the highest number of lagoon-side suites of any resort in Bali.

In homage to local cultural traditions, a Balinese Mecaru blessing ceremony to launch the renovation of the resort's new Lagoon Access Suites Project was held on February 24th followed by a cocktail reception for travel agents the following day.

Each of the 43-square meter Lagoon Access suites will feature a private patio providing direct access to Resort's new lagoon.

In creating the revamped accommodation the hotel is working with leading Indonesian architects and furniture companies using the finest wood and other materials. Lina Wiyanti of Moduler Interior, well experienced in designing the interiors of several five star properties, is redecorating the resort's Lagoon Access Suites. Moreover, every aspect of the project is designed to comply with Green Globe requirements.

The US$ 12 Million Lagoon Access Suites Project will feature a cool and tranquil ambient in earth-tone hues enhanced by a hand-carved limestone entry wall. Large desks are being designed and lighting fixtures will be upgraded at the desk and by the bedside. The New Diamond King Koil bed will have a novel duvet, bed runner and a classic yet simple headboard design.

General lighting will be improved with new controls and stylish shades. A specially designed chair will ensure guest comfort of guests enjoying the lagoon and garden view and a 37" LCD television. A glass door will lead to the private patio where a coffee table surrounded by chaise lounges will welcome those who want to relax and enjoys the Meliã Bali's lush tropical gardens and blue Lagoon. Spacious marble bathrooms offer separate large tubs, standing showers and the latest in contemporary fittings. The resort's new room type will offer the most lagoon access suites on the island.

Shown on balidiscovery.com are illustrations of the new lagoon suites now being installed at Melia Bali.


New International Boarding School for North Bali
Putera Sampoerna Foundation Obtains 5-hectares of Land from Bali Government to Build Center of Educational Excellence in North Bali.

The Jakarta Post reports that Bali's provincial government has entered into an agreement with the Putera Sampoerna Foundation that will pave the way for the establishment of an international boarding school on the island.

The Sampoerna Academy in Bali will offer an international standard senior high school education utilizing both a national and international curriculum in a boarding school setting.

Under the terms of the agreement, Bali is providing a 5-hectare parcel of land in Kubutambahan village in Buleleng, north Bali where the Sampoerna Foundation will build a campus. The Foundation says they will establish a center of educational excellence and a generous scholarship program to allow talented Balinese children every opportunity for a world-class education.


Bali Tourism Will Suffer form Higher Alcohol Taxes
Bali Business Leader Sees Threats and Opportunities in Higher Taxes on Imported Alcohol.

BisnisBali reports that high taxes in the form of customs and excise tax applied on imported alcohol are a great concern for Bali business people.

Threatened tax increases of as much as 300 percent have the potential of damaging Bali tourism where the consumption of alcoholic beverages is an important part of a holiday visitors experience.

"High import duties (and taxes) inflate the price. The high taxes also will increase the incident of smuggling," said Panudiana Kuhn, the Chairman of the Provincial Entrepreneurs Association (APINDO).

Panundiana, who is also an entrepreneur in Bali's hotel and garment sectors, acknowledged the government's right to increase alcohol prices, but bemoaned the possibility of increases up to 300%, arguing that sudden increases in alcohol costs can cause tremendous short-term damage to the island's tourism.

At the same time, Panudiana admitted that huge tax increases carry the less-obvious positive effect of creating opportunities for local alcohol producers who can create quality beverages able to compete with imported products. "I am confident that producers of arak, berem, tuak and Balinese wine – if produced at a good standard – can secure a share of the existing market," he said.

Meanwhile, the provincial government of Bali's chief of Industry and Trade Department, I Gede Darmaja, is convinced that price increases are inevitable. His department will soon meet with distributors to discuss the situation.

Related Article

[Taxing Problem of Getting a Drink in Bali]


Wiring Paradise
Sanur Paradise Plaza Bali Hotel Offers Free High Speed Internet Access.

Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel & Suites, Bali has added free high-speed Internet access in all its rooms together with wireless Wifi connections throughout all public areas of the property available to all in-house guests.

The high speed broadband Internet connection provided by Centrin is considered one of the fastest Internet services in Bali, providing speeds of up to 3.5 MBPS.

Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel & Suites has recently undertaken a total renovation of all rooms on the ground floor, executive suites, Sanur Harum Restaurant, ballroom, meeting rooms and created a Club Floor of 42 Club Rooms with an exclusive Plaza Club Lounge.

Keith Bell, General Manager says, "This free high speed broadband service is a huge added value to all our in house guests whether with us for business or pleasure. The commitment to deliver the best began from the very first day that the hotel opened".

Book a stay at the [Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel]


Easy, Easy Rider
Bali Police Admit Presence of Many Illegal Big Bikes in Bali.

The recent seizure of two large motorcycles by the Bali police for lacking the proper import, tax and road certificates has reawakened the long-simmering controversy regarding police collusion in support of the illegal operation of large two-wheel vehicles on Bali's roadways.

Beritabali.com reports that the two motorcycles with a value of hundreds of millions of rupiahs were seized in an area close to Bali's traffic police headquarters.

One of the large motorcycles was driven by Eka Sukmana from Mengwi, Bali. The second seized bike was a Suzuki Sport model driven by Mark Richard Loe of Jalan Basang Kasa Gang Badung, in Seminyak.

An unnamed source told Beritabali.com that the second bike was caught traveling on Jalan Gunung Sanghyang.

Curiously, both bikes were seized on December 17, 2009, but the case only came to the attention of the press on April 6, 2010.

According to Beritabali.com, police officers contacted by them refused to comment on the case. When Wahyu Tri Cahyono, a ranking officer at the Bali Traffic Police office was contacted he declared he was not handling the case, insisting his office was only involved in matters related to driver licenses. According to Cahyono, vehicle documents are handled by the vehicle registration office Samsat.

Meanwhile Agus Sugianto of the Bali Police insisted that the two vehicles were not in police custody.

According to Beritabali.com, the current case offers proof once again that unregistered large motorcycles continues to be major problem in Bali, with an estimated 90% of large bikes presumed to be illegal. Past press reports have alleged official police involvement in the motorcyclist associations which "sponsors" temporary licensing arrangements for the illegal vehicles.

In a separate article in the same media, the chief of the Bali Traffic Police, Gede Alit Widana, admitted to the press on April 8, 2010, that there are many illegal large motor bikes in Bali.

Widana said his office is processing the case of the two seized bikes which is still under investigation. "After our investigation at the criminal division of the traffic police headquarters, and not the traffic division. In addition to a lack of registration the two bikes were also found to be using fake license plates. . .we continue to hold the bikes."

If the owners of the bikes which to take possession they must, according to Widana, present legal registration documentation which includes import certificates and vehicle registrations from Samsat.

The lead traffic cop admitted that there are many unregistered big bikes in Bali and that his office will not play favorites in deciding who to prosecute. Widana explained, "If they lack the required documents and are on the road we will seize them and investigate."

When challenged by the press who asked if the police protect and escort unregistered bikes traveling in convoys under the guise of community service, Widana said that the police do grant "a little" tolerance to these illegal vehicles.

Widana quickly amended his comments, saying that escorts are provided by the police and when the same vehicles are found traveling independently on main roads without complete certification they will be seized in accordance with the law.

Explaining the reasoning for this selective enforcement, Widana said: "these big bikes travel fast and are difficult to bring to a quick stop and, as a result, are prone to accidents. Thus, if they are traveling independently we will stop them and review their documents."

Related Article

[75% of Older, Large Motorcycles in Bali Illegal]


Command Change at Bali-based Udayana Military Command
Major General Hotmandgaradja Pandjaitan Replaced by Major General Rachmat Budiyanto at Bali Command of 9th Udayana Military Command.

Major General Hotmangaradja Pandjaitan handed over his post as Commander of the 9th Udayana Military District to his successor, Brigadier General Rachmat Budiyanto. Pandjaitan has held the military command for Bali and its surrounding areas since June 26, 2008.

Major General Pandjaitan's new assignment will as a Ministerial Secretary for Politics, Law and Security (Polhukum).

When met by the press at the rehearsal for the handover ceremony, Pandjaitan said he had been much moved by his brief assignment in Bali and would miss living in Bali.

The two-star general, born in Palembang, South Sumatra in 1953, reflected on his 22 month tour of duty in Bali supervising military security for Bali, West Nusa Tenggara and East Nusa Tenggara, he enumerated various successes including the supervision of a peaceful democratic election and the execution of numerous community service projects. He said he felt his time in Bali was too brief and there were many things he still wished to do for the people living with the Udayana command area.

Among his most poignant memories, according to Pandjaitan, was the excellent cooperation he received from the people of his command area in combating terrorism. He called on the people to use introspection and nationalism in order to preserve unity and peace.


Selling Women's Health at Bali's Main Market
Join a Women's Health Fund Raiser by the Rama Sesana Foundation in Bali on April 21, 2010.

The Rama Sesana Foundation (YRS) is a non-profit, non-governmental organization founded in 1999. YRS operates a reproductive health service center and educational program from the Pasar Badung traditional market in Denpasar, Bali. Located in the center of the island's capital city, the market is the largest traditional market complex in Bali, active almost 24 hours a day. The vendors, laborers and customers at the market are overwhelmingly comprised of woman. It was for this reason that YRS has centered its activities in the busy market, providing health services and information directly to the womenfolk of Bali.

In order to provide essential funding for the essential medical services provided by YRS, a day of fund-raising will be held on Kartini Day, Wednesday, April 21, 2010 at a private residence on Jalan Pengembak 19, Sanur from 9:00 am – 5:00 pm.

The full-day bazaar offers:

• Raffles tickets for Rp. 50,000 (US$5.30) with attractive prizes.

• Merchandise for sale, including handicrafts, clothing, and soap nuts from the market, organic produce from Ariesta Bali Farm, and more.

• Food and beverage

• Sales and information booths from Bali-based businesses.

As part of their continuing women's health programs, Pap smears will also be available during the day at a cost of Rp. 300,000 (US$32). This "donation" includes follow-up appointments with the medical team and 4 raffle tickets.

For more information, to make a donation, or to display your company's merchandise at the bazaar telephone +62-9(0)81 338 088 837 or +62-(0)361-288159.

If you or someone you know needs women's health services at any time, drop by the YRS Center at Pasar Badung (4th Floor), Monday-Thursday, 9:00 am - 4:00 pm and Fridays 9:00 am - 1:00 pm. Closed on public holidays.

Payment for health services are based solely on ability to pay.

Related Site

[YRS Website]


Tempered Temperance in Bali
Bali Customs Officer Bust Two Stashes of Smuggled Booze.

The Jakarta Post and Radar Bali report the seizure furinh the first week of April 2010 of thousands of bottles of imported alcohol lacking the required excise stickers or bearing counterfeit stickers. The value of the 2,827 bottles of liquor seized at two locations in Bali is estimated at Rp. 500 million (US$53,000) equal to Rp. 150 million (US$16,000) in loss tax revenues had the alcohol been sold illegally on the market.

The seized imported beverages were comprised of wines and hard liquor originating from U.S. and European manufacturers.

Customs officials conducted raids on two warehouses located on Jalan Gatot Subroto in Denpasar and Jalan Danau Tempe in Sanur and arrested two individuals in connection with the raids. If convicted of breaking Customs regulations the two could each face five years in prison.

Local tourism observers continue to warn that high taxes imposed on liquor and wine imports create ripe opportunities for black market activities.


Are Indonesian Tourists Getting Short Shrift in Bali?
Udayana University Study Suggests that Bali's Largest Inbound Source of Tourists are Being Neglected and Abused by the Island's Tourist Industry.

An article in The Jakarta Post warns that the Bali tourism industry must accord the same level of courtesy and attention to domestic tourists as the island extends to its annual intake of more than 2 million foreign visitors.

A study conducted by Bali's Udayana University Culture and Tourism Research Center estimates that 53 percent of all Indonesian undertake travel during holiday periods. Among the most popular domestic tourist destination are found on Bali, Java and Sumatra with an estimated 2.9 million Indonesians having taken a Bali holiday in 2008. In other words, more than 59% of all tourists visiting Bali in 2008 came from domestic sources.

The head of the research center, Agung Suryawan Wiranatha, pointed to the significant economic impact of domestic tourism warning that Bali's tourism industry must pay more attention to the needs of Indonesian travelers. "The focus here has long been on foreign visitors, including in promotional activities and services," said Wiranatha.

Bali tourism operators have traditionally sought sought domestic clients whenever international crisis, health scares, global economic downturns or terrorism have caused international tourists to stay away from Bali. Despite the refuge offered by the money spent by domestic visitors, many Indonesians have complained of discriminative service at Bali businesses.

The Sari Club - a main terrorist target in the October 2002 attack on Bali, was notorious for its refusal to allow Indonesian revelers admittance to the nightspot. According to the report, this policy of segregation remains in place in many Bali nightspots and restaurants.

One domestic tourist, Lola Hamid, told The Jakarta Post, she had been turned away from a restaurant in Bali with the waiter telling her the food was "too expensive for an Indonesian." Another woman told of being asked to leave a local boutique by a staff members who was more interetsed in serving a foreign guest.

Wiranatha warms Bali tourism must improve their promotion and services to domestic tourists; a failure to do so will occur at its own peril.


One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Schapelle Corby Seeks Mercy from President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono for 20-Year Sentence for Smuggling Drugs into Bali.

The Australian beautician academy student Schapelle Corby has reportedly filed a petition with Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono seeking clemency in connection with her 20-year jail sentence for smuggling 4.2 kilogram of marijuana into Bali. Arrested in October 2004, Corby underwent a high-profile trial that ended in January 2006 with the Indonesian supreme court reaffirming the original sentence of 20 years imprisonment.

In seeking mercy from Indonesia's president, lawyers for Corby are asking that her sentence be reduced or that she be set free. The petition to the president contains affidavits from Indonesian and Australian mental health experts affirming that the 32-year-old Queensland woman is clinically insane, suffering from deep depression and psychosis. A Bali-based psychiatrist has stated that Corby's life is at risk if she is not removed to new surroundings, given close supervision and put on a regular course of medication.

Her doctors alleged that the prison environment at Bali's Kerobokan penitentiary is unsuitable for the woman who has adopted a child-like demeanour that has made her susceptible to exploitation.

The request to President Yudhoyono also underlines alleged irregularities in the police investigation and trial process including a failure to fingerprint the plastic bag containing the marijuana; the lack of a video record of her arrest at Bali's airport, the failure to provide surveillance videos from the airport in Australia; the lack of weight records for the baggage boarded in Australia and the refusal of Indonesian officials to allow DNA testing of the confiscated plants. In further mitigation, lawyers for the Australian woman cite a major cocaine bust at Sydney's airport that implicated baggage handlers who reportedly committed their crime on the same day Schapelle Corby transited that airport on her way to Bali.

Clemency appeals are exceedingly rare in Indonesia. The President is not under any legal compulsion to respond to the petition and, if he does so, such a reply could take months or even years.


The Good is Oft Inflamed with their Bones
Jero Wacik: Remember the Many Contributions of late Bali Governor Ida Bagus Oka.

Indonesia's Minister of Culture and Tourism Jero Wacik eulogized Bali's late governor Professor Dr. Ida Bagus Oka, calling on the public not to criticize Oka but, instead, to remember his many contributions on behalf of the island.

The late governor, former family planning minister and academician died on March 7, 2010, was cremated on April 9th at the Sumerta village cemetery in a traditional Balinese ceremony accompanied with military honors, including a 21-gun salute.

74-years-old at the time of his death, Oka was remembered by a family spokesman, IB Alit, who thanked all who had taken time to attend the religious ceremony, reminding all that no man is without flaws and begging forgiveness for any mistakes committed by governor Oka during his life.

The Vice-Chairman of the Bali House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali), IGB Alit Putra, lit the cremation pyre for Oka who is survived by 7 children, numerous grandchildren and his second wife.

Among the VIPs attending the cremation were former Bali governor Dewa Beratha who served as Provincial Secretary during the gubernatorial term of Oka; the Minister of Culture and Tourism Jero Wacik; the Mayor of Denpasar IB Rai Mantra; the Municipal Secretary for Denpasar Rai Iswara; and the former Municipal Secretary Made Westra who was a long-serving assistant to Oka and currently serves as provincial chief of cooperatives. Governor Made Mangku Pastika did not attend the cremation due to his attendance at nyineb karya religious ceremonies being conducted at Bali's Mother temple of Besakih.

Interviewed by RadarBali, former governor Dewa Beratha remembered Oka as a highly disciplined individual who always maintained a cheerful disposition. Beratha said Oka also possessed a prodigious memory.

Culture and Tourism Minister Wacik said he hope the people would not criticize Oka who played a central role in Bali's development. "Don't criticize him, remember his contributions which were very substantial in advancing Bali at the time," said Wacik.

Related Article

[Former Bali Governor Ida Bagus Oka Dead at 75]


In Bali, it Takes a Village
The Village is the Law in Bali Traditional Settings.

A leading professor from the law faculty of Bali's Udayana University, Professor Dr. Wayan P. Windia, say that Bali's traditional villages have a strategic role to play in solving numerous regional problems in Bali.

Quoted by the national new agency Antara, Windia says, "if personal, family or community problems arise, these can all be sorted out in the first instance by the leaders of the traditional village." He went on to explain that if such problems cannot be arbitrated on a face-to-face basis they can be brought before the entire community for resolution in village hall meetings. Individuals who violate traditional norms and refuse to submit to the community's decision can face penalties. "Those penalties range from simple demands for a public apology to the more severe remedies of isolation and exile from the village," Windia explained.

According to the esteemed law professor, once a punishment is decided by a village council the matter is over with no room for further consideration, "the idea of further appeal, tears shed by the victim or allegations of denied human rights mean nothing to a traditional village."

He underlined that what's important to traditional village inhabitants is that a punishment has been meted out and, after that, it is not a matter for further discussion by the villages or even neighboring communities. Village problems are dealt with internally by the concerned community in accordance the "awig-awig" (rules) that govern daily life.

Delving further into the social dynamics at play in a Balinese village setting, Windia explained that villagers unhappy with the rulings, punishments and decisions rendered by his fellow villagers will generally remain silent, with resentment only bubbling to the surface at a later date, usually when the village is in an unstable state of flux. "For example, when there is a death in the village and the corpse is being escorted to a grave or in other unfortunate situation, a problem that has for years remained dormant will re-emerge. This factor makes the final resolution of internal village disputed problematic," according to the professor.

In the end, says Windia, such deep-seated resentment cannot be extinguished via village meetings and consultation with local elders, making it possible that unanticipated social unrest can break out at any time on the island of Bali.


Governor Pastika: Time to call a 'Time Out'
Editorial: Balidiscovery.com Appeals to Bali's Governor to Carefully Pause and Reflect Before Allowing Proposed Changes in Property Ownership Rules for Foreigners.

With fundamental changes promised in the property laws that may open the doors to foreign ownership of land in Bali and the rest of Indonesia, we call on Bali's hard working governor to declare a "moratorium" – calling a "Time Out" on any changes in property ownership laws in Bali until the matter can be thoroughly and carefully considered by Bali's indigenous citizens.

One Sanur-based expatriate property developer, boasts via a website, seminars, newsletters and weekly radio show that Bali will become "the next Hawaii" with demand increasing by 500% to 1,000% once the law is changed. Such boasts ignore the irrevocable destruction and displacement inflicted on Hawaii's traditional culture by past real-estate booms. It is as though these greedy magnates have forgotten the charm of deeply held traditions that first persuaded them to move to Bali.

As underlined on numerous occasions, we are deeply concerned that Bali's subak and banjar-based societies will prove unable to withstand the full-on assault of cash-rich non-Balinese, both Indonesian and foreign, eager to stake a claim on their own personal piece of paradise.

Lured by quick money with little mind to the long-term consequence, the Balinese are proving to be abysmal stewards of their precious birthright, an island whose charms and natural beauty are quickly losing their luster.

Sad proof that things have seriously gotten out of hand are everywhere. The Islands Rivers are fetid with pollution. Beaches are washing away as surrounding reefs that once protected the island are bombed, pummeled and hauled away. A growing water shortage and over-exploitation of underground water reservoirs are allowing sea water encroachments and turning once-verdant areas of the islands into wastelands. Architectural standards that once mandated cosmic balance be maintained in layout and finishes have been abandoned in favor of cement and aluminum monstrosities. Cliff and beach side construction erect barriers to century-old rights-of-way once used by the Balinese for seaside prayer. And, huge billboards, standing three-deep in some areas, provide ironically comic relief to the man-made devastation they camouflage on the horizon.

Governor Pastika, Call a 'Time Out' for Bali

With the International Real Estate Association (FIABCI) conference set to take place in Bali May 24-28, 2010, targeted as the launch date for new liberalized foreign ownership rules for Indonesia, we think that date would also be auspicious for Bali's governor to proclaim "not now, not here and not until the Balinese have a chance to thoroughly consider the matter" as regards foreign property ownership in Bali.

Pak Pastika, there is little to be lost and much to be potentially gained by calling a moratorium and ordering the barbarians at Bali's gates to "hold on to their horses."

In keeping with the legal autonomy put in place in 1999 and intended to allow Bali to decide and determine its own future course, such a moratorium could be used to convene Balinese experts in law, culture and sociology to thoroughly consider how best to preserve and protect Bali for future generations of Balinese.

Om Çanti Çanti Çanti Om ...

Related Articles

[The Liberalization of Foreign Property Ownership in Bali]

[Defacing Bali]

[Bali Real Estate: Boom or Bust?]


A Full Course Load Offered by Mozaic in Fine Dining
Bali's Mozaic Restaurant Gastronomique in Ubud Features 6-course of Fine Dining and Wines from Paul Jaboulet Aîné on April 17, 2010.

As a continuing part of its commitment to bring outstanding cuisine paired with premium wines to Bali, Ubud's award-winning Mozaic Restaurant Gastronomique is holding a Paul Jaboulet Aîné special wine dinner for one night only on Saturday, April 17, 2010.

A six-course tasting menu accompanied by outstanding wines, paired by Christopher Brunet of Paul Jaboulet Aîné and the culinary team of Mozaic, will be enjoyed by those fortunate to secure one of the limited seats available for this special evening.

Mozaic owner and founder Chris Salans, assisted by Chef James and Chef Anthony, have prepared a special menu using only the finest and rarest ingredients of the season including fresh black truffles, foie gras and caviar.

The Paul Jaboulet Aîné label has been synonymous for almost two centuries with fine wines from France's Rhône Valley.

The Menu and the Wines

PAUL JABOULET AÎNÉ DINNER

AMUSE BOUCHE

Citrus Ceviche of Langoustines, Lemon Pepper and Beluga Caviar

Grenache, Viognier & Marsanne, Bourboulene & Clairette, Côtes du Rhône, Parallele 45, 2008. Paul Jaboulet Aîné

+ + +

Black Cod, Smoked Cheese Tortellini, Iberco Ham Broth and Slow Roasted Pork

Marsanne, Crozes Hermitage, Les Jalets, 2007, Paul Jaboulet Aîné

+ + +

Salt Cured Foie Gras with Black Winter Truffles and Sweet Breads

Grenache & Syrah, Côtes du Rhône, Parallele 45, 2006, Paul Jaboulet Aîné

+ + +

Farm-raised Cervana Tenderloin, Toasted Spices, Cocoa and Cinnamon

Syrah, Cornas, Les Grandes Terrasses, 2000, Paul Jaboulet Aîné

+ + +

Poached Vanilla Tomatoes, Strawberry Gelato and Fresh Kaffir Lime Leaf

Grenache, Le Petit Jaboulet Rosé, 2008, Paul Jaboulet Aîné

+ + +

Millefuille of Nougatine, Salted Coffee Cream and Sechuan Pepper Reduction

Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah & Mourvèdre, Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Les Cèdres, 2006, Paul Jaboulet Aîné

+ + +

Petitis Fours



Price for the dinner, including wines is Rp. 1,500,000, plus 21% tax and service (US$193) per person.

Reservations are a must and can be made by calling Mozaic at +62-(0)361-975768.


 
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