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Jln. By Pass Ida Bagus Mantra,
Jln. Pucuk 1 No. 70X
Denpasar, Bali
Indonesia

24h:
+62 (0)812 3819724
Tel:
+62 (0)361 464 032, +62 (0)361 471 0242

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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #1109 - 04 December 2017

IN THIS UPDATE


Culture Clubbing on the Second Sunday of Every Month
December & January Program Schedule for ĎBale Banjar Culture Club' at Ayodya Resort Bali to Feature Jan Mantjika on a Life Spent in Bali (Dec 10th) and Dr. Lawrence Blair (Jan. 14th) on Bali as the Island of the Dogs

The second monthly Bale Banjar Culture Club – a series of free lectures and presentations held on the second Sunday of each month at the Ayodya Resort Bali – will take place on Sunday, December 10, 2017, when long-time Bali resident and author Jan Mantjika will discuss her book, “Bali 1964 to 2009: The Shadows that Dance in and out of my Memory.”

New Zealander when she first arrived in Bali with her Balinese Columbo Plan husband and an infant daughter in 1964, Mantjika was forced to comprehend her way through a confusing Babylon of new languages; hungrily live from hand to mouth in a world of never-ending shortages; cheerfully accept demands to fulfill the ritual and cultural demands of being a dutiful Balinese wife; and negotiate daily life in a country experiencing a whirlpool of nationalistic frenzy where foreigners were often viewed with fear and loathing.

Arriving in Bali during the “years of living dangerously,” Jan raised her young family from within the confines of a Balinese compound while tumultuous events of precipitated by the “failed” coup of 1965 unfolded around her. Many historians claim that the bloodletting and social upheaval that followed the "night of the generals" reached its frenzied peak in Bali 1965-1966 as Jan protectively clung to her children as angry crowds marched down Bali's streets. Food and daily essentials, such as soap, were hard to come by as neighbors whispered over backyard walls about acquaintances who had suddenly disappeared and local rivers and beaches strewn with the bodies of the newly massacred.

Jan’s book and memories span the period from the troublesome 1960s to modern Indonesia, a period in which she raised a family, established a successful travel agency, and became a valued patron of a foundation assisting handicapped and disabled people in Bali.

Jan will read selections from her book and share anecdotes from her remarkable life during her appearance the Bale Banjar Culture Club on December 10, 2017.

A limited number of Jan Mantjika’s books (Saritaksu Press, 2015), now in its second printing, will be available for purchase and author’s autograph during the December 10th gathering – just in time for Christmas giving.

Dr. Lawrence Blair 

Be sure, also, to mark your calendar to attend the 3rd Bale Banjar Culture Club on Sunday, January 14, 2017 when the world-renowned filmmaker and author Dr. Lawrence Blair will show his film “Bali – Island of the Dogs” and speak on “Beasts of Bali, and How to Enjoy Them - a new look at the creatures which inhabit both the Island and its Mythology”

Dr. Blair has spent much of the past 40 years living in, exploring, and making films about Indonesia. In 2006, he wrote and presented, for SKY TV UK, the five-part series Myths, Magic, and Monsters, which explores the stranger sides of both nature and the human mind. He is also the writer, presenter, and co-producer (with his late brother, Lorne) of the internationally acclaimed series RING OF FIRE, (PBS in the States, and BBC in the UK) which won two Emmy awards in l988 and awakened the world to Indonesia’s existence.

In addition to having been Visiting Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Southern California, Lawrence has also co-written and or co-presented documentary films:  Bali – Island of the Dogs, Baraka, and The Coral Triangle, which have aired this year on Animal Planet. Dr. Blair is much in demand as a speaker for corporate keynote address and as a lecturer on luxury cruise ships and private expedition ships exploring the remote corners of Indonesia

Bale Banjar Culture Club
Schedule of Speakers
7:00 pm - Ayodya Bali Resort at the Bale Banjar


Sunday – 10 December 2017
The Shadows that Dance in and Out of My Memory: Bali 1964 -2009
By Janice Mantjika

Sunday – 14 January 2018
Bali – Island of the Dogs - Beasts of Bali, and How to Enjoy Them - a New Look at the Creatures, which Inhabit both the Island and its Mythology
By Dr. Lawrence Blair

Sunday – 11 February 2018
Do you Dare to be a Balinese?
By I Gusti Raka Panji Tisna
A graduate of U.S. and Australian Universities, Panji is a man of many parts: author, cultural expert, lecturer, dancer and internationally certified Yoga instructor all forming part of his diverse and interesting biography. While many fantasize on the idyllic existence of being “born Balinese,” Panji will share the specific challenges and tribulations of what growing up in a Balinese household entails.

Sunday - 11 March 2018
Balinese Music Demystified
Vaughan Hatch - Ethnomusicologist
Native New Zealander and ethnomusicologist Vaughan Hatch first came to Bali in 1997 to commence what has become a life-long study of traditional Balinese music. Along the way Hatch established a Balinese family and founded the Sanur-baed Mekar Bhuana musical group dedicated to preserving ancients forms of Balinese gamelan and compositions. Hatch is certain to add insights that will enhance everyone’s appreciation of Balinese Music

For more information Email 


The 9-Days of Christmas
AYODYA Resort Bali Plans 9-Days of Yuletide Festivities December 24, 2017 Until January 1, 2018

Product Update:
AYODYA Resort Bali’s celebration of the Christmas and New Year spans 9-days starting on December 24, 2017 until January 1, 2018.

A 9-Day Beach Party

The sustaining event backing the extended celebration is “Big Shots – Road to New Year 2018” – a 9-day beach party held each day from 3:00 pm until 12:00 pm, extended from 2:30 pm until 2:00 am on New Year’s Eve. Admission to the party is free of charge with those joining the festivities urged to dress apropos for a casual holiday beach party. Enjoy a range of tempting food and beverage on offer while enjoying musical entertainment provided by the Island’s top DJs and performers. Among the DJs adding to the mix are Aspara, Jody Lynne, Scotty Cal, and Archie. Live performances are also booked by Bali’s talented trumpeter and bandleader Rio Sidik, saxophonist Martin, guitarist Riwin, The Soul Brothers, and the Crazy Horse Band.

Also not to be missed is the beachside countdown to 2018 on New Year’s Eve that will include a glorious display of fireworks.

While the 9-day holiday party takes place on the beach, a whole range of joyous activities are scheduled inside the 5-star luxury resort over the period:
  • Wednesday, December 20, 2017: Mark the start of the yuletide season by attending the Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Java Hut. From 5:30 pm until 8:00 pm raise a glass of good cheer as the tree is set aglow at sunset. Join in Christmas carols offered by a Balinese church choir while eggnog, Gluwein and canapés are shared with friends, both old and new.
  • Sunday, December 24, 2017 - Christmas Eve: Enjoy festive ala carte selections at the Lagoona Restaurant, Waterfall Restaurant, and Octopus Restaurant. Advance reservations suggested.
  • Sunday, December 24, 2017 - Christmas Eve: Natal in Nippon! The Sunday Japanese Buffet at the Genji Restaurant available from 6:30 pm until 11:00 pm for only Rp. 399,000 net per person.
  • Monday, December 25, 1017 - Christmas Day: Not to be missed is the amazing array of meats and seafood from the Ayodya Resort Bali’s state-of-the art smoker buffet dinner from 7:00 pm until 11:00 pm. Priced at only Rp. 550,000 net per person.
  • Sunday, December 31, 2017 – New Year’s Eve Dinner: Ring in the new and farewell the old with a five-course degustation menu at the Lagoona Restaurant. Rp. 1,000,000 net per person.
  • Sunday, December 31, 2017 – New Year’s Eve Dinner: The Waterfall Restaurant features a special New Year’s buffet dinner and Balinese dance performance 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm Rp. 650,000 net per person.
  • Sunday, December 31, 2017 – New Year’s Eve Dinner Japanese Buffet at Genji Restaurant from 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm Rp. 650,000 per person.
For bookings and more information:

AYODYA RESORT BALI
Jl. Pantai Mengiat,
Nusa Dua 80363
Bali – Indonesia

Telephone: +62-(0)361 – 771102

Facsimile: +62-(0)361 – 771616

Email: info@ayodyaresortbali.com pr@ayodyaresortbali.com

www.ayodyaresortbali.com


Itís So Nice to be Appreciated
Grand Hyatt Bali Holds Annual Industry Appreciation Night

y continued with fun games followed by prizes for the best dressed and door prizes.

Three best dressed winners - Dewi from Epicure magazine, Suchy from Lotus Asia Tours, and Valeriya from Navigator won stays at a Hyatt property including flights for two. Brigitta from Bali Event won the door prize - a three-night stay at Grand Hyatt Bangkok and a two-night stay at Hyatt Regency Hua Hin including flights for two.


Permission to Stay
Baliís Immigration Helped Tourists Holding Expired Visas While Waiting Ngurah Rai Airport to Reopen.

During the temporary closing of Bali Ngurah Rai Airport during the eruption of Mount Agung, the Director General of Immigration granted extensions to foreigners who, due to the lack of a departing flight, overstayed the period of their original visa.

Quoted by Jawapos.com, Agung Sampurno, a spokesman for the Director General of Immigration, said on Tuesday, November 28, 2017: “In connection the eruption of Mount Agung, the Ngurah Rai Immigration Office has been given the authority to grant stay permits to foreign visitors in situations of force majeure allowing extensions until such a time as they are able to depart from international gateways other than Bali.”

NusaBali reports that during the two days when the airport was closed on Monday and Tuesday, November 27 and 28, 2017, the Bali Airport Immigration Office granted 455 emergency extensions to foreign tourists from 46 countries affected by cancelled flights.

An immigration official said that of the 445 emergency overstay permits granted the largest number of extensions were given to Germans (47), Dutch (45) and Australians (44).

With the reopening of the airport on November 29th the emergency visa extension program was suspended due to availability of flights out of Bali.

The closure of Bali’s airport commenced on Monday, November 27, 2017 at 7:00 am and reopened at 3:00 pm two days later on November 29, 2017.

Fewer Arrivals 

The impact of the continuing eruption of Mount Agung was demonstrated by the fact that on December 1, 2017, a total of 5,424 domestic passengers departed Bali while 5,256 domestic passengers arrived on that date. There was, however, less balance among international passengers passing through the airport. On December 1st a total of 14,436 international passengers left Bali while only 4,206 international passengers arrived. In other words, while international flights left Bali full inbound international flights were arriving with very low levels of passengers.

After closing on Monday morning, November 27, 2017, Bali’s airport reopened two days later on November 29th at 3:00 pm.


Laid Low by a High Mountain
Tanah Lot and Ulun Beratan Temple Suffering Visitor Downturns Due to Mount Agung Eruption

In connection with the continuing eruption of Mount Agung and the temporary closure of Bali’s Airport, tourist attractions in the Tabanan Regency of West Bali are recording dramatic declines in visitor totals.

NusaBali reports that the iconic seaside Tanah Lot Temple and Ulun Beratan Temple at Candikunung are experiencing a sudden and significant dearth of visitors.

Tanah Lot visitor totals are down 30%. While during “normal times” an average of 8,000 domestic and international tourists come to see and photograph the temple standing in the ocean a short distance from the shoreline, current counts are now closer to 5,000 daily visitors. When NusaBali visited Tanah Lot on Wednesday, November 29, 2017, it reported a markedly quieter atmosphere and a parking lot part empty.

The Manager of Tanah Lot, I Wayan Toya Adnyana, lamented the downturn in visitors, blaming the continuing eruption of Mount Agung and the temporary closure of Bali’s airport for the visitor drop.

To try to build visitor numbers during the current situation, Tanah Lot’s managers are launching campaigns on social media and travel partners assuring the public that Bali remains safe for visitors. Work on improvements and repairs on the surrounding infrastructure continue at the popular destination for tourist visitors.

Meanwhile, the Ulun Danu Beratan tourist area in Bali’s mountain lake district has also experienced a drop in visitors linked to the continuing active state of Mount Agung. Visitor tickets sold have declined from a normal 2,000 coupons daily to only 800 coupons per day. The manager of Ulun Danu Beratan, I Wayan Mustika, complained: “It’s very quiet. Visitor numbers are down 60%.”

Given the current situation, the managements of both destinations are hesitant to predict visitor numbers during the coming Christmas and New Year holiday period, usually a peak period for visitors.

With the reopening of Bali’s airport on Wednesday, November 29th after a two day closure, both Tanah Lot and Ulun Danu Beratan have commenced promotion programs emphasizing their locations are far-removed from any areas designated as under threat should a significant eruption of Mount Agung actually occur.


The Run Around at the Roundabout
Police and Construction Teams Recommend Detours and Alternate Routes for Traffic Near Baliís Airport During Underpass Construction

Work has begun on the new underpass located near the entrance to Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport slated for completion before a major International Monetary Fund – World Bank Conference slated for Bali in October 2018.

NusaBali reports that major changes in traffic flows in areas surrounding the airport are now in place to permit construction to move ahead.

A road building official said the following changes have been carefully coordinated with the Bali police:
  • Vehicle traveling from the Bali Airport to Nusa Dua or the Bali Mandara Toll Road are now being diverted to the Dewa Ruci Monument in Kuta accessing the toll road from the Benoa entrance.
  • Vehicles coming from Denpasar and Sanur and destined for the Airport are recommended to travel via the Toll Road  from the Benoa entrance and entering the Airport via the Ngurah Rai Roundabout.
  • Vehicles leaving the airport and headed for Kuta or Denpasar are recommended to take alternative routes using Jalan Raya Tuban connecting to Jalan Iman Bonjol in order to access Denpasar from the Iman Bonjol intersection.
Further alternative routes to ease traffic congestion are in the process of being devised.


Pastika not Ready to be Put out to Pasture
Governor Pastika Describes Various Scenarios for Life in Retirement from Public Service

After serving the maximum allowable two-terms as Bali’s Governor, Made Mangku Pastika will enter his formal retirement in a distinguished career that included long service as the Chief for the Bali Provincial Police, head of the National Ant-Narcotics Agency, and Bali’s Chief Executive Officer.

NusaBali reports that Governor Pastika has no intention of purchasing a rocking chair for his coming retirement. In discussing his future plans, Pastika says he is considering perhaps managing a school, running for legislative office, or running public welfare group (LSM).

“The point is that there are many ideas and agenda inside my head. For me, we must use our lifetime and be useful for as long as we can. Don’t waste the life we’ve been given. If needed, I can run a public welfare group (LSM),” explained Pastika on Monday. November 28, 2017.

Bali’s former Chief of Police and the man credited with bringing the Bali bombers to justice said he wants to know what it's like to be working outside the “ring,” noting he has been the subject of much criticism and suggestions during his years of public service. Adding: “Just once in the future let me be the one who is doing the criticizing. So why don’t I form a LSM or a group that has the job criticizing the government.”

When asked if he had a possible name for this LSM, Pastika replied: “Later, I’ll make Bali Development Watch (BDW) whose function will be to control, monitor, and provide critical input on matters related to Bali’s development. That’s just an example. Hopefully, I will be given the chance to achieve this by the Almighty. The main point is that we must fill our lives with usefulness. Don’t waste your life, that’s what wise people say.”

When asked about the coming election for Bali’s Governor, Pastika said he hopes his successor would be able to lead Bali better than he has. “Basically, let him do a better job than we are doing right now,” said Pastika.

Until now, Governor Pastika has remained non-committal in saying who he will support to become Bali’s next Governor in the 2018 Gubernatorial election.



Democracy in Ashes
Bali Democracy Forum December 7-8, 2017 Relocated to Tangerang, West Java

As reported by The Jakarta Globe, the Indonesian Ministry of Foreign Affairs has made the decision to shift the 10th Bali Democracy Forum from the Island to Tangerang on the outskirts of Jakarta.

The decision to relocate the conference was made by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Thursday, November 30, 2017, one day after Bali’s Airport reopened following a two-day closure caused by dust from erupting Mount Agung.

Cecep Herawan, director general for information and public diplomacy at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, announced at a public press conference: "The government has decided to change the location of the 10th Bali Democracy Forum to the ICE [Indonesia Convention Exhibition] in Tangerang, Banten."

The annual conference was originally scheduled for December 7-8, 2017 in Bali in Nusa Dua. And, while Bali was now reopened for business, the decision to relocate to Tangerang was done in order to avoid any possible inconvenience to conference delegates.

The two-day closure of Bali’s airport on November 27, 2017, was made as a safeguard against the danger to civil aviation posed by volcanic dust from the erupting Mount Agung volcano. The two-day closure disrupted travel for an estimated 9,000 foreign tourists.

The Bali Democracy Forum is expected to welcome 29 national delegations and a number of representatives from international organizations.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo is scheduled to open the forum that will discuss democratic development in the Asia-Pacific Region.


An Island of Risk Free Explorations
5 (Among Many) Bali Travel Experience to Enjoy Despite the Continued Rumbling of Mount Agung

In the midst of overblown and simplistic reports in the international media of impending disaster in connection with the possible eruption of Mount Agung, the general public is yet to understand that even in the worst case scenario of a major volcanic eruption only some 2% of Bali’s total land mass – an area limited to a specified radius of 8-10 kilometers surrounding Mount Agung – would be directly affected by a major eruption.

In fact, people staying in the main tourist areas in South Bali, located some 70 kilometers from Mount Agung, remain oblivious to the current eruption with their information limited to news reports on television and the Internet.

Kompas.com recently highlighted five among many tourist activities that can still be enjoyed in Bali in areas far removed from Mount Agung.

1. Rafting on the Ayung River

through Bali’s highlands and past the village of Ubud, the Ayung River is one of Bali’s favorite whitewater rafting locations. Suitable for beginners on their first rafting trip, the currents and rapids while exciting are not overwhelming. And, best of all, enjoy scenic Bali while passing through picturesque villages along the way.

2. Cycling and Trekking in Ubud

utskirts of the Village of Ubud a cycling or trekking journey will pass through ancient terraced rice fields. Some of these trekking trips start virtually in the Center of Ubud, commencing from Bukit Campuhan for the Campuhan Ridge Walk. Many tour operators in the area feature guided bike tours. Smart bike tour participants join tours that commence in Kintamani overlooking the Batur Volcano, allowing an easy ride downhill to Ubud.

3. Shopping Excursion to the Kuta Art Market and Seminyak

s and gift items galore await dedicated shoppers visiting Bali. Clothing, exotic textiles, carvings and a whole range of other handicrafts are sold in sophisticated retail outlets or simple roadside stalls.

The Kuta Art Market is open daily from 8:00 am until approximately 7:00 pm, located on the beach at Kuta and access via Jalan Kartika Plaza.

4. Snorkeling at Menjangan Island

just offshore in northwest Bali, Menjangan Island is a protected part of West Bali National Park with the surrounding waters renowned for its outstanding snorkeling. Access to Menjangan is via the small port of Labuan Lalang – a three-hour drive through scenic countryside from Denpasar or less than an hour's drive from the port of Gilimanuk that is easily accessed via the East Java airport at Benyuwangi. Once you arrive at Labuan Lalang, the trip to idyllic Menjangan Island is only a 15-30 minute boat ride away.

5. Handicraft Tour

uo;s large handicraft industry operates largely as a home industry. Visitors can visit village locations and witness first hand the intricate and attractive handicraft items being fashioned for sale to visitors. The Village of Batuan is famous for its stone carvings. A short distance away, the Village of Celuk has many workshops making silver jewelry. Meanwhile, on the road to Ubud, the Village of Mas is a center for making attractive Balinese masks. Handicrafts are made in many communities on the road from Sanur to Ubud - explore and be amazed by the unequalled skill of Balinese craftspeople.


Our Volcanic Cup Runneth Over
Volcanic Experts Predict Mount Agung Crater will Breach with Molten Lava Before 12 December 2017

Nusa Bali reports that large “overscale” earth tremors during the five-day period from November 28 – December 2, 2017 are interpreted by expert observers to mean that molten lava totaling 30 million cubic meters is currently contained within the volcano’s crater - an amount estimated at half the crater’s total carrying capacity of 60 million cubic meters in a crater with a diameter or 900 meters and a depth of 200 meters.

Volcanologists predict that sometime over the coming ten days through December 12, 2017, the molten lava will breach and overflow, most probably to the north where the craters wall is at its lowest.

The head of Center of Mitigation of Geologic Disasters (PVMBG), Gede Suantika, outlined the above scenario for an active eruption during a press conference held at Mount Agung Observation Post in Rendang, Karangasem on Saturday, December 2, 2017.

Sunatika explained that over the five days starting from Tuesday, November 28, 2017, the reservoir of molten lava building within the volcano is causing the nighttime illumination of the clouds of steam emanating above the mountain. “If the overscale tremors continue, in the next ten days the crater will become filled with molten lava and spill over the northern side of the crater,” explained Suantika.

This scenario would bring rivers of lava to Desa Ban (Kubu Sub district) and Desa Dukuh (Kubu District). From there, the lava can be expected to flow to the coastal Village of Tulamben before flowing into the sea.

Gede Suantika warned that any eruption scenario remains possible, with lava flows potentially going in other directions. It is still also possible that the mountain will contain the lava and no eruption could occur if the current tremors suddenly subside.

Suantika confirmed that the mountain is now emitting some 3,000 tons of poisonous gasses comprised of sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Currently these clouds of gas rise and are diluted in the upper atmosphere.

Because of the threat of an eruption and the presence of poisonous gasses officials have ordered an evacuation zone measuring between 8 – 10 kilometers from Mount Agung’s peak.

On Saturday, December 2, 2107, during the 18-hour period between midnight and 6:00 pm, six deep volcanic earthquakes and nine shallow tremors were recorded on Mount Agung.


Back to a New Normal
Bali Airport Slowly Resumes Normal Flight Schedules as Arriving Passenger Numbers Grow

The State News Agency Antara quotes PT Angkasa Pura I (API I)– the managers of Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport saying that arrivals totals have begun to rebuild commencing from Thursday November 30, 2017 – one day after the airport reopened the preceding day at 3:00 pm.

The AP-l spokesperson, Rai Arie Ahsanurrohim, said on Saturday, December 2, 2017, “This trend continues to climb upward due to improving operational and airlines resuming their normal schedules.”

Arie said the number of international passengers landing in Bali on Thursday, November 30, 2017, totalled 3,788 passengers arriving on 63 aircraft.

On Friday, December 1, 2017, the number of international passengers increased to 4,206 flying on 57 aircraft.

Meanwhile, domestic arrivals remain strong with 12,317 domestic passengers landing during the period November 30 until December 1, 2017.

Arie said he remained optimistic that arrival totals – both domestic and international – will continue to improve over time as airport operations return to normal.

Despite the reopening of the airport, some airlines, particularly those operating from Australia, have delayed resuming normal flight schedule with some international airlines limiting their flights to only daytime hours.

Five international airlines operating 18 flights cancelled flights on Saturday, December 2, 2017. The cancelled flights involved flights departing and arriving to and from Singapore, Bangkok, Guangzhou, Perth, Kuala Lumpur, Tokyo, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Port Hedland (Australia).

Arrivals to Bali on December 2nd were cancelled from Singapore, Guangzhou, Kuala Lumpur.

Domestic flight from Jakarta, Bandung, Lombok, Surabaya, Makassar and Yogyakarta were also cancelled on December 2nd.


Eating Well and Frugally in Bali
A List of 5 Very Affordable Bali Culinary Experiences

While temporary airport closures and flight delays may be prolonging the stay of some visitors to Bali, there are worse fates than being temporarily stranded in Paradise. Many have used the extra time to explore Risk-Free Bali Explorations  or to enjoy the vast range of eminently affordable local and imported culinary offerings.

With the help of Kompas.com, here’s 5 famous and legendary restaurant recommendations at which to while away your time during an extended stay in Bali.

1. Ayam Betutu Gilimanuk

or duck, cooked “Betutu-style” – is a quintessentially Balinese dish that is a “must do” for any epicurean exploration of Bali.

Among many restaurants featuring this dish, perhaps the most renowned is Ayam Betutu Khas Gilimanuk where this succulent dish spiced with ginger, laos, tumeric, galangal, lime leaves and bird’s eye chilies can be found.

Ayam BetutuKhas Gilimanuk has six outlets in Bali located on Jalan Raya Tuban, Jalan Raya Kuta, Jalan Merdeka, Jalan Raya Kediri, Jalan Buluh Indah, and Jalan Raya Denpasar.

Ayam Betutu
(chicken) tends to be hotter than Bebek Betutu (duck). Be sure to ask for a side of Betutu broth called “betutu kuah.”

2. Nasi Ayam Ibu Oki

Ayam Bali is a deceptively simple dish that is arguably the most preferred lunchtime for millions of Balinese each day. Affordable usually costing less than Rp. 50,000 per portion, this dish is a plate of rice slathered with strips of spicy boiled chicken, adorned with several portions of Balinese sate lilit made with ground chicken or fish, tea egg (telur pindang), and 'Balinese Jukut Urab' - a mixed vegetable salad made from beans, spinach, sprouts, andgrated coconut dressed in sweet and sour flavors.

Restaurants will happily modify the spiciness of a plate of Nasi Ayam Bali in the preparation process or via the amount of tasty sambal sauce dashed on the side as a condiment.

Try Warung Nasi Ayam Ibu Oki on Jalan Siligita Nomor 27 in Nusa Dua. Also visit the famed Warung Wardani with two locations: Jalan Yudistira No. 2 in Denpasar or Jalan Waringan No. 3 at the entrance to Bali’s airport.

3. Gusto Gelato

Bali’s most popular ice cream parlor, Gusto Gelato on Jalan Mertanadi No. 46 B (near Bali’s Kerobokan Prison) is crowded from morning to night with ice cream maniacs lining up to try the tens of flavors that include traditional standards and exotic variants of ice cream that is, for instance, chili flavored.

4. Rujak Gelogor

k Gelogor is the Balinese rendition of "rujak"  that incorporates thin slices of raw and sometimes unripe fruits - unripe papaya, young mangga, jicama, carambola (belimbing or sour star fruit), and kedongdong (anbarella). The “secret” of Rujak Gelorgor is in the thick and flavorfull sauce of made of chilies, nut sauce, pindang fish sauce, and fragrant shrimp paste.

Visit Warung Rujak Gelogor on Jalan Bukit Tunggal No. 27, Pemecutan, in Denpasar for this spicy and uniquely Balinese delicacy.

5. Pasar Sindhu

r Sindhu is the Sanur Night Market. During the day, this location sells the produce and ingredients for a day’s grocery shopping. At night a transformation takes place leaving a culinary wonderland of delicious and affordable food. Traditional Balinese food and items from other parts of Indonesia are served from 5:00 pm until late night.


Bali Tourism Scholars Lend a Hand
162 Bali Tourism Academy Students Volunteer to Help Mitigate the Impact of Mount Agung Volcano

Students and faculty from the Sekolah Tinggi Pariwisata Bali (STP) – the Bali Tourism Academy have been playing a lead and proactive role in mitigating the negative impact of the continuing highly active state of the Mount Agung volcano.

Dewa Gede Ngurah Byomantara, the chairman of STP Nusa Dua, told Detiktravel.com: “We have prepared 162 STP Bali students and 33 teachers to help mitigate (the crisis) through the Bali Tourism Board Hospitality Media Center. We have provided training, a set of standard operating procedures for crisis mitigation, and also familiarised them with the psychology of service.”

The 162 student have been positioned at 15 assembly points to be used in an acute disaster contingency and 12 positioned in the Media Centre. This not only provides valuable help to the tourism industry in the current situation, but also provide hands-on experience the students in dealing with the public.

Those assigned to assembly points are on stand by in two shifts each day working at locations such as the Indonesian Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) in Nusa Dua and in both the Domestic and International Terminals at the Bali Airport.

Students working as traveler’s aid assistants have also been assigned at the Mengwi Bus Terminal for people traveling to Java by road.


Jimbaranís Latest Spa Destination
MŲvenpick Resort & Spa Jimbaran Bali Showcases Indonesiaís Wellness Heritage at New Arkipela Spa

Product Update

Mövenpick Resort & Spa Jimbaran Bali has unveiled its new Arkipela Spa, a sanctuary of wellness that showcases Indonesia’s rich wellness heritage.

Arkipela Spa presents age-old recipes and therapeutic customs handed down over the generations to create experiences that leave guests feeling refreshed and revitalized. The Spa blends the ancient practices and wisdom of Indonesian wellness traditions using herbal ingredients.

n October 2017, Arkipela Spa is open to both in-house guests and outside customers and can be easily accessed via the Samasta Lifestyle Village, the retail mall located adjacent to the resort and Mövenpick Café.

Created by Hadiprana of the Indonesian design studio, Arkipela Spa features nine tranquil treatment rooms, a sauna and a selection of shiatsu massage rooms. A hair salon is planned as a future feature.

“We are delighted to unveil our beautiful Arkipela Spa, providing yet another opportunity for our guests to unwind and soak up the exquisite culture of Bali and the Indonesian archipelago,” said Horst Walther-Jones, general manager, Mövenpick Resort & Spa Jimbaran Bali.

Adding: “With our perfect location close to Jimbaran Bay, contemporary Balinese design and authentic ambience, Mövenpick Resort & Spa Jimbaran Bali has always aimed to connect guests with the island’s heart and soul. Natural wellness treatments have been practiced in Indonesia for centuries and the new Arkipela Spa will allow guests to experience these ancient arts in a luxurious and stylish setting.”

e treatments draw inspiration and wisdom from all corners of Indonesia. From Lombok, a traditional “Sasak Massage” incorporates long strokes, stretching, acupressure and aromatherapy to release deep-set tension, while “Oukup Martup” is an ancient Sumatran herbal steam therapy; “Pijat Urat” is a classical Balinese treatment that revives spiritual energy; and Java’s “Ginger Kerokan Treatment” uses local ginger and massage techniques to improve circulation and boost the immune system.

Arkipela Spa has created a series of wellness journeys. The 90-120 minutes “Buatanku Apothecary Experience” uses a blend of seasonal elements and traditional therapies to rebalance the body and mind. This signature experience can be tailored to the specific needs of each guest. Alternatively, the 180-minute “Arkipela Signature Experience” is an intuitive treatment that combines a serene signature massage, body treatment and natural facial to restore balance to the body and leave guests feeling light and revitalized.

Guests seeking corporeal cleansing and renewal can select from a series of body scrubs and wraps. These include the “Kaluku Body Glow” from Sulawesi, “Java Slimming Treatment”, and “Black Borneo Lulur" from Kalimantan. Finally, choices of facial treatments embrace natural, organic, local ingredients and techniques to leave guests’ complexions feeling smoother and their skin looking radiant.


A Conference to Bank On
Despite Mount Agung Eruption, Plans Moving Ahead for IMF-World Bank Meeting October 12-14, 2018

The Jakarta Globe reports that the planned international conference of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank set for October 2018 remains on schedule for Bali despite the continuing eruption of the Mount Agung volcano and the temporary closure of Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport.

The head of the IMF-World Bank 2018 Task Force, Peter Jacobs, said on Monday, August 27, 2017, “"The preparation runs as usual while we monitor the development of Mount Agung"

Jacobs said that the national committee for the Indonesian conference have a contingency plan in place should Bali not be available. Adding; "We all are still hoping everything will run well until October 2018. There's, of course, a 'Plan B' . . . but it will depend on the developments."

The IMF-World Bank 2018 Annual Meeting is scheduled for October 12-14, 2018. More than 15,000 delegates are expected to attend from 189 countries.


A Mountain of Trouble
Governor Concerned for Baliís Welfare if Mount Agung Crisis is Prolonged

Beritabali.com reports the continuing eruption of the Mount Agung volcano, the temporary closing of Bali’s Airport and the resulting downturn in tourist arrivals have become a major concern of Bali’s Governor Made Mangku Pastika.

The Governor stated his concerns during a visit to a volcanic observation post in Rendang, Karangasem on Monday November 27, 2017.

“There is no need at this point to worry about funds and logistics (for the evacuees); we need to worry about the continuing effect (of the volcano) on the lives of the people and Bali tourism. If logistics and money we have enough to meet the needs of the evacuees with the Central Government ready to assist,” explained Pastika.

The Governor also urged members of the media to not exaggerate the continuing situation of from Mount Agung, avoiding giving a  overly negative impression for tourists visiting Bali.

The Governor said: “The current situation can go on for one month with a long term impact (on Bali). We don't know when the situation will return to normal.”

 


A Sleeping or a Napping Giant?
Mount Agungís New Found Calm May Signal Either a Return to Dormancy or a Coming Eruption

The head of the Central Agency for the Mitigation of Geological Disasters (PVMBG), Devy Kamil Syahbana, says the Mount Agung Volcano has suddenly become quieter as compared to its recent period of intensified seismic activity.

As reported by Metrobali.com, Devy said the newfound calm might mean that the molten lava that has made its way from deep below the mountain to the surface of the crater has hardened and solidified. Explaining that once lava is exposed above ground to the atmosphere it will quickly cool and harden. Thus if lava resides for an extended period in the crater is will both thicken and harden over time.

“If (the lava) hardens its mobility also decreases,” explained Devy on Sunday, December 3, 2017, during an interview at the Mount Agung Observation Post at Rendang, Karangasem.

He went on to explain that the question has now become whether or not the upward march of the lava has slowed because the mountain has depleted its energy source or is the lava's pathway is only blocked momentarily by lava that has hardened into a crust.

Based on the recent experience of Mount Rinjani in Lombok, Devy related how, following an eruption of that volcano, he climbed to the peak to take lava samples. Saying: “I once climbed Rinjani to gather a lava sample a few hours – less than 24 hours - after an actual eruption. The lava had already begun to cool. How the lava cools depends on the surrounding atmosphere.”

Continuing to relate his experience with Mount Rinjani, based on the measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) found within the mountain’s lava he detected a dramatic decrease in that gas – amounting to a 20x reduction than the SO2 present during the eruption.

The reduction of SO2 can happen when the energy driving the eruption has dissipated or then the lava channels have somehow become blocked and can portend a coming eruption.

Measurement done at Mount Galeras in Mexico just below it erupted also showed reduced levels of SO2 at the mountain’s peak. Merpati in Central Java also showed reduced levels of SO2 in 2010 prior to a major eruption.


 
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Bali Update #622
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Bali Update #621
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Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
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Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
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Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
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Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
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Bali Update #611
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Bali Update #610
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Bali Update #609
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Bali Update #608
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Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
April 07, 2008

Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
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Bali Update #601
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #600
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
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Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
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Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
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Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
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Bali Update #581
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Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
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Bali Update #578
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Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
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Bali Update #573
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Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
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Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
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Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
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Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
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Bali Update #551
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Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
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Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
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Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
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Bali Update #521
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Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
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Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
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Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
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Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
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Bali Update #503
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Bali Update #502
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Bali Update #501
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