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Komplek Pertokoan
Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
Sanur, Bali, Indonesia

Tel:
++62 361 286 283

Fax:
++62 361 286 284

U.S.A. Fax:(toll free)
1-800-506-8633

U.K. Fax:
++44-20-7000-1235

Australian Fax:
++61-2-94750419

24h:
++62 812 3819724

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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #937 - 18 August 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


For Whom the Bell Tolls
Indonesia Moving to Reduce Death Row Population by Increasing Rate of Executions

The Bali Post quoted the National Chief Prosecutors office as confirming that prosecutors in Banten (West Java) and Jakarta are making preparations for a suden surge of executions of prisoners now under sentence of death in Indonesia.

A Junior Chief Prosecutor, Hamzah Tadja, (photo) confirmed steps are in play that will soon bring 20 people on death row in the two locales before a firing squad.

The numbers slated for death are 3 in Banten and 17 in Jakarta. While confirming the preparations are ongoing, Hamzah refused to give a time or a place for the coming executions.

“I am not allowed to tell you (the time of the planned executions). Later, when it’s time, you’ll know,” Hamzah explained on Monday, June 25, 2012.

He added that he was unable to provide complete data on the total number of people now sitting on death row across Indonesia, because local prosecutors have yet to file formal reports on the actual number of those under a sentence of death who have exhausted all possible avenues of appeal.

“(But), We have this data from prosecutors in Jakarta and Banten,” he said.

Earlier, Chief Prosecutors had reported that through October 2012 there were 100 people on death row, down from an earlier figure of 116. The decline was due to remission of sentences (7), escapes from prison (6) and death by natural causes (3).

According to prosecutors, from the original 116 on death row nationwide, 58 were convicted of narcotics violations, 55 for premeditated murder and 2 for terrorism. (sic)

Included among those who have exhausted the appeal process and are now close to execution are:
  • Merika Pranola from Tangerang, Banteng who was convicted of smuggling 3.5 kg of heroin.
  • Harnoko Dewantoro in Jakarta convicted of premeditated murder.
  • Gunawan Santoso, also known as Acin, in Jakarta convicted for premeditated murder.
  • Iwan Darawan Mutho, also known as Rais, and Achmad Hasa, also known as Agung Cahyono, convicted or terrorism.
  • Yuda Akang, Sastra Wijaya, Tjik Wang also known as Akwand or Ricky Candra, Federik Luttar, Lim Jit Wee also know as Kim, Jet Lie Chandra also know as Cece, Hunphrey Ejike also known as Doktor, Gap Badia also known as Papa, Euge Ape, also known as Felixe or Ek, Fere Dike Ole Kumala also known as Samuel, Tham Tuck Yun also known as Atjay (Malaysia), Seck Osman (Senegal) and Marhin Anderson also known as Belo (Ghana) – all convicted of narcotics violations.
  • Marco Archer Cardoso Moreira (50) from Brazil. A former Bali resident arrested in Jakarta in 2003 with 13.4 kg of cocaine concealed in a hang glider.
Indonesia has recently formalized the appeal process for those under sentence of death in order to shorten the time between sentencing and actual execution. In the past, the appeal process could consume decades.

The last execution before a firing squad in Indonesia occurred in 2008 when the three Bali bombers were shot.


Bali Turning the Corner in Rabies War
Human Fatalities on the Decline as Dog Vaccination Program Recommences in Bali

As a result of successful mass vaccination of dogs across Bali, human deaths from rabies have reduced by over 90% since 2010, decreasing from 11 deaths in the month of August 2010 to less than one per month in 2012.

The Bali Provincial Livestock Services received an additional 67,000 doses of rabies vaccine in the last week of June 2012. The vaccine, provided through the Government of Indonesia- United Nation Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) Rabies Control Program funded by AusAID, USAID and FAO will be used to continue a third round of mass dog vaccinations that commenced at the end of March 2012. The vaccine has been delivered to each district in Bali to continue vaccination activities.

A further 53,000 doses of vaccine will arrive in the near future in order to complete the third round vaccination campaign.

A supply shortage of vaccine in the middle of the implementation of third round vaccination had caused a temporary break in dog vaccination activities. During the gap in vaccination, other activities continued to improve community awareness of the dangers of rabies, addressing emergency vaccination needs for positively proven cases, and completing vaccination in villages yet to reached 70% of all dogs in a specific locale As a result, the temporary pause in vaccination had no detrimental effect on the spread of rabies because the Bali dog population still has sufficient immunity due to the result of the previous two rounds of mass vaccination.

The Bali Province Vaccination Teams have pledged to keep the levels of dog immunity high by finding and vaccinating as many unvaccinated dogs as possible. The regency-based rapid response teams will also continue to respond to bite cases by investigation, response and emergency vaccination and continue to work closely with their counterparts in the Bali Health Service.

To date, 158,000 dogs had been vaccinated during the third round. Of these, 70% are roaming street and village dogs, known to be the most at risk from catching and transmitting rabies. The remaining 100,000 dogs will be vaccinated over the coming months to complete the third round of mass vaccination.

The number of rabies cases in dogs has dropped dramatically by 90% since the mass vaccination campaigns began in September 2010. The reduction in rabid dogs has led to a similar 90% reduction in human deaths from rabies, decreasing from 11 in August 2010 to less than one per month during 2012.

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Tourism a Disaster for Baliís Poor?
Tourism Is Making Baliís Poor Poorer

Bali Daily (Jakarta Post) has quoted Bali’s governor Made Mangku Pastika saying, “Tourism is a disaster for the poor. When the tourism sector is developed, the price of people’s daily needs become more expensive and, particularly for the poor, unaffordable,”

Labeling tourism as a potential disaster for the poor, the governor cited his home regency in North Bali: 
“For instance, in Buleleng, when tourism in the northern part of Bali has developed, at the same time, people who live in poverty will become poorer. Tourism also attracts many people from outside Bali to come and work here. The influx of these migrant workers will drive the price of food and other needs up.” 

The governor continued, calling for government action to protect the poor and disadvantaged: “With the low income that the farmers receive, while the price of daily needs becomes more expensive, farmers won’t have any another choice except to sell their land. Being a farmer in this kind of economic setting could prevent them from improving their quality of life.” Adding: “The rich people will become richer, poor people become poorer, the strong people become stronger. The smart people become smarter, because they have more opportunity to access quality education and other facilities, while poor people can only access lower quality facilities. This creates an ever-widening social gap.”

Seeing government programs as a way of dealing with the problem, Pastika said: 

“The vicious circle of poverty should be broken. Government has the obligation to do this and to improve people’s welfare.”

Trying to address poverty in Bali is not without its obstacles. Looking ahead, Pastika said: “The worst thing is there is no synergy between all the programs that are managed by the government . . .

The administrations are still divided along the regions’ and agencies’ selfish egos, as well as political interests. This is our big task.”

The governor has pioneered programs to empower poor villages and eradicate poverty. The Gerbang Sadu – Bali Mandara Program is an village integrated development program that has provided Rp. 1 billion (US$106.000) of cash assistance to five villages launch and stimulate community-based economic initiatives. “

Provincial statistics estimate 183,100 impoverished residents living in Bali. Those statistics ,tallied in September 2011, estimate the number of poor grew 10.6% from the number reported just six months before.

Bali ranks 2nd nationally after Jakarta for having the highest percentage of poor.



Flights Not Fancy
Merpati Nusantara Airline Closing 10 Air Routes in Pursuit of Profitability

State-owned Indonesian airline Merpati Nusantara has announced plans to close 10 of their 124 air routes in order to reduce the massive losses being sustained by the troubled carrier.

As reported by Bisnis.com, Merpati is targeting to achieve 90% passenger load factors on its flights in order to move from losing money on a daily basis to posting a profit of Rp. 500 million (US$53,750) per day.

Over the past 5 years Merpati claims they have suffered an average daily loss of Rp. 1.5 billion per day (US$161,300).

The newly appointed CEO of Merpati Nusantara Airlines, Rudy Setyopurnomo, confirmed the closure of 10 air routes, including Jakarta via Halim Perdana airport to Bandung and Jakarta to Pangkal Pinang.

“For the route Jakarta-Bandung the plane has a capacity of 56 passengers, but they carry only 2 passengers. This has gone on for months causing continuous losses,” said Rudy on Monday, June 25, 2012.

The airline boss confirmed that 10 routes have been closed and more closures may follow. He emphasized that for routes flown to Eastern Indonesia such as Merauke, Jayapura and Sorong will continue to operate together with pioneering routes.

Earlier, Rudy had projected that between 10-20% of the routes operated by Merpati may eventually be closed. He remains optimistic that within six months Merpati will be able to net a 15% profit from its total income. He said that Merpati is targeting sales of Rp. 2-3 trillion by the end of 2012, an increase of 42% from 2011 when the airline had sales of Rp. 1.6 trillion (US$172 million). Of that total income 80% came from commercial route operations with the balance from pioneer routes to remote areas of Indonesia.

Rudy said Merpati was currently achieving an 86% load factor.

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An Island that Eats Together
Uma Ubud Presents ĎMegibungí Ė the Most Balinese of Communal Meals to Raise Funds for Local Charities

In a tradition that traces its roots back to 1692, Balinese warriors from Karangasem once took their meals from common plates before setting off to do battle with Sasak tribes on neighboring Lombok.

The meals, called a Megibung followed strict rules of menu and dining protocols – all meant to instill camaraderie for the shared battle that lay ahead.

The passage of the intervening centuries has loosened original rules that mandated a menu using only pork items to now include the modern variants of chicken, goat and even beef in the megibung's fare.

Unchanged, however, is the communal fellowship of shared goals and tasks that inspired the megibung shared meal more than three centuries ago.

Reviving the grandeur of the ancient megibung, Uma Ubud will host a special dining event on Saturday, July 28, 2012 at the resort’s Kemiri Restaurant. Appropriate to the shared challenge that characterizes this Balinese culinary rite, the proceeds from the Uma Ubud event will assist worth causes in the community.

Preparing the evenings meal with be the executive chef of the Uma Ubud Heidi Flanagan and Bali’s ‘raw’ food pioneer Diana von Cranach.

The evening commences from 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm with drinks and canapés at the Uma Ubud’s poolside accompanied by music from a traditional rindik ensemble. A silent auction in support of the nominated charities will also get underway during cocktails.

Dinner will be served between 8:00 pm – 10:00 pm featuring a rare Palawakia performance. Combining dance, song and trompong performance – Palawakia was revived in the 1970s after a lapse of nearly four decades. The performance requires the physically challenging kebyar style of terompang playing, with singing roles performed by warrior dancers.

The Bali charities to benefit from Uma Ubud’s salute to Balinese food and culture are the Sari Hati Foundation (Essence of the Heart Foundation) and the Yayasan Anak Pemuteran (Pemuteran Children’s Foundation).

Sari Hati Foundation is a small volunteer and community-based educational centre located in Banjar Lungsiakan—the same village that is home to  Uma Ubud. The center provides a nurturing environment for mentally disabled young adults and their families, assisting the children’s assimilation into the local community.

The Yayasan Anak Pemuteran provides support to junior and senior high school students for children from Pemuteran, in northwest Bali. The foundation helps more than 100 children continue their schooling and supports a small warung that in their community that teaches school leavers basic food and beverage skills.

Megibung – Not Just Another Charity Dinner
Kemiri Restaurant
Uma Ubud
Jalan Raya Sanggingan - Ubud, Bali

Saturday, July 28, 2012
7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Rp. 1,450,000 per person (US$156) – Inclusive Tax and Service

For reservations and information Telephone ++62-(0)361-972448

[Email

[Book a Stay at Uma Ubud]



Constructive Criticism Temporarily Halts Toll Project
Bali Lawmakers Order Halt on Benoa to Nusa Dua Toll Road Over Concerns that Access Roads are Poorly Designed

Construction of Bali’s new toll road connecting Benoa and Nusa Dua may be facing delays following a surprise inspection by Bali legislators (DPRD-Bali).

Following that visit, legislators expressed concern that the highway, as it is currently designed, will cause traffic jams from overflow to existing roadways as motorists line up at toll booths, a formal letter was issued on Monday, June 25, 2012, calling for construction to stop on the highway access at Nusa Dua and the airport until lawmaker’s concerns can be addressed.

Officials in charge of the project have promised a project review in order to make sure that cars lining up to use the new toll road do not result in traffic jams on the existing road ways.

Legislators were quick to underline that their call to halt construction affects only small areas of the entire project and should not cause delays, if addressed in a timely manner, on a project scheduled for completion in time for the APEC conference in 2013.

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Gather Moments While You May
Model Drowns During Seaside Photo Session in Bali

A 32-year-old model, Rahmadiyah Diyanti, lost her life during a photography session on the seaside of Pantai Mejan, Tabanan, West Bali on Saturday, June 23, 2012.

According to Kompas.com, the woman, from Malang, East Java, was being photographed by French photographer Dominique Ja Clande when she slipped at the ocean’s edge and fell into the sea.

The photographer, who was photographing Diyanti at a distance when she fell, rushed to her assistance and jumped into the ocean in a futile attempt to save the woman.

Heavy seas and strong currents thwarted Ja Clande’s rescue attempts, carrying the woman and the photographer out to sea. Local fishermen eventually brought the two to shore, but the woman had already perished.
 


Just the Ticket
Plans to Include Airport Service Charge in Bali Air Ticket Price

PT Angkasa Pura I, the State-owned company that manages 13 airports, 2 cargo warehouses and air traffic service centers, has announced plans to end the practice of collecting separately the Airport Service Charge (ASC)  from passengers departing on international and domestic flights in Bali and the other airports it operates.

As reported by the State New Agency Antara, the CEO of Angkasa Pura I, Tommy Soetomo, said on Monday, June 25, 2012 that the Airport Service Charge will soon be included in the passenger ticket price to be subsequently paid by the airline directly to the airport authority.

According to Soetomo, the system will first be introduced for passengers flying on Garuda Indonesia and later expanded to other carriers.

Angkasa Pura says the change in procedure will take place later this year.

Angkasa Pura Pura I operates the airport authority for Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.


A Users Guide for Bali
Bali Guide Association Calls for Raids Against Illegal Guides to be Intensified

The Bali Chapter of the Indonesian Guide Association (HPI-Bali) has declared its hope that raids against illegal guides working on the island will continue and be intensified to eliminate the large number of unlicensed guides.

Quoted by Seputarbali.com, the spokesman for HPI-Bali, Amos Lilo, said: “I hope the raids can continue because (the illegal guides) have caused unrest in the ranks of our profession and damaged the image of Bali tourism. This needs to be done to bring order to Bali tourism.”

Lilo said that surprise raids against illegal guides have only take place one time so far in 2012. That raid performed in late May 2012 caught 34 illegal guides working at several tourist attractions. Those caught were Bali residents who are still being processed through the courts.

Also netted in the raid was one foreigner, a German national, who was handed to immigration authorities for further handling.

The HPI-Bali is consolidating its effort to eliminate illegal guides with other tourism organizations in Bali.

Lilo said that the prime target of illegal guides in Bali remains Chinese tourists. Lilo estimates that 30% of the 5,265 guides estimated to be working in Bali are illegal and unregistered.


Missing at Sea
Tanjung Benoa Water Sports Operators Say Business is Down 30%

Bisnis Bali reports that while foreign tourist visitors to Bali continue to grow, visitors to water sports operators at Tanjung Benoa in South Bali have recently dropped by 30%.

Wayan Dharma, a water sports operator in Tanjung Benoa, said, “We don’t know exactly why (the drop in customers) has happened, it may be the result of tourist visitors shifting to different tourism objects.”

Dharma acknowledged that there is a continuing decline in foreign tourists visiting water sports operations at Tanjung Benoa. Adding: “Lots of people visit, but the number who participate in the sports is small. There is a decline of around 30%, especially for foreign visitors.”

The waters sports businessman, who also serves as a director of the Association of Water Sports Operators (Gahawisri), denied any connection between the decline in visitors and a number of accidents involving water sports activities at Tanjung Benoa. He insists that safety standards are now high among Tanjung Benoa operators, claiming that accidents of late have become rare occurrences.

Dharma also suggested another factor causing the delcine in business may be that domestic tourism to Bali has flattened, with little growth in that market sector.

To counteract the decline Gahawisri plans to begin promoting their water sports activities abroad and is scheduling a promotional trip later this year to Hong Kong involving 20 watersports operators.


Keeping in Touch
Overwhelming Worldwide Surge for Balinese Spa Workers

There is a growing worldwide demand for Bali trained spa therapists.

Quoted by Seputarbali.com, a spokesman from the Bali Manpower Department, said, “Indeed, every year the request for spa therapists, especially from Bali Spas, increases." Continuing, he explained that the people of Bali are also increasingly eager to accept positions abroad working in four and five star spas or cruise ships.

Data from the Manpower Department shows that 177 Bali residents traveled abroad in 2010 to work as spa therapists. In 2012 that number grew to 1,697 workers.

Interim figures through the end of May have counted 686 spa workers leaving Bali for posts overseas thus far in 2012.

The 2,560 Bali residents leaving for spa positions from 2010 until May 2012 are now working in 49 countries. The U.A.E., Russia, Turkey and France rank among the most popular destinations for spa assignments for Balinese working abroad.

Officials predict that by the end of 2012 the number of spa positions available to Balinese workers will surpass 4,000 – a number that will overwhelm the ability of local spa companies to fill those vacancies.

In order to supervise the exodus of Balinese seeking spa positions abroad, the Manpower Department has established an Association for the Placement and Protection of Indonesian Spa Workers with an initial membership of 42 companies and organizations.

The government has helped form the new Association in order to register and monitor all Balinese residents accepting overseas spa positions.


Barely Legal
Bali Legal Expert Warns that Foreign Villa Owners in Bali Face a Rough Road Ahead

Bali's real estate boom, fueled by villas purchased by foreign investors, appear to be ultimately headed for a bust.

As reported by Bisnis Bali, one-by-one legal cases involving villa ownership by foreigners are being lodged with the civil courts or the police in Bali.

Ketut Suwiga Arya Dauh, a leading local lawyer, predicts “I think in the coming ten years there will be many property case disputes in Bali.” He explained that a failure to understand Indonesian law and the mistaken belief that “everything can be sorted out” has lured many foreigners into a false sense of security, unaware of the many problems they may face in the future.

He cited as contributing to the problems confronting foreign investors in Bali are efforts by many to avoid taxation and use of illegal and unconstitutional means used to secure control of a property, such as registering the ownership of a property in a local nominee’s name.

Suwiga predicts the myriad problems ahead for foreign investors are beginning to accumulate. He warned that the growing litany of problems for foreigners investing it property would only begin to emerge after ten years. He bemoaned that the large number of cooperative agreements built on poor legal foundations and the bad faith of many foreign investors serve as preludes to the coming maelstrom of litigation.

To underline the murky and legally complicated situation in which foreign investors in Bali may soon confront, Suwiga alluded to a recent decision in the Denpasar District Court refusing to hear a suit files by villa owners in Kuta against PT Maximus Bali, its President Director Hanno Soth, Russell C. Blagg and PT Hanno Bali. In that case, the presiding judge ruled the Denpasar District Court did not have the jurisdiction to rule in the case due a to clause in the original agreement mandating that disputes be settled by arbitration in Hong Kong.

The plaintiffs in the case were Francisco Noriega Malave, Anthony Desmond Hatton and Profit Power Management. The plaintiffs own three villas in a development managed by PT Maximum Bali.

The suit filed before the Denpasar court claimed mishandling of income tax payments dating from 2006 and income distribution from the three villas.

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Tiger Tiger Burning Bright
Three Baby Tigers Born at Bali Zoo to a Pair of Bengal White Tigers

A pair of white Bengal tigers at the Bali Zoo have given birth to three orange-striped cubs on Monday, June 11, 2012.

The proud parents are two rare white Bengal tigers: 9 year-old mother Kartini and her 8.5-year-old mate Buntung.

The three cubs born at the Singapadu facility in Gianyar, now just three weeks after their birth, weigh 4 kilograms each and measure between 57 and 60 centimeters in length. The white tiger gene is known to produce some of the largest tigers in existence. Accordingly,  the three “girls” are showing signs of the very large cats they may become, having almost tripled in length and added 3.8 kilograms in weight in less than 20 days.

Kartini is an enthusiastic mother of the three. "Mum" is provided by the zoo with three liters of milk and calcium supplements each day. Meanwhile, her children are now having their mother's  milk diet supplemented with two feedings of fresh meat each day weighing 4 kilograms.

The cubs will be weaned from Kartini in September, three months after their birth.

The three offspring - who have been given the names Punja, Delta and Gangga - are being kept in special enclosures under intensive care by a team of veterinarians. The doctors are reportedly most pleased with the trio’s progress.

Born to a pair of white tigers who obtain their white color via a recessive mutant gene, the three orange tiger cubs born at the Bali Zoo are not unheard of among white tiger births and are classified as “Golden Tabby Tigers.” Such offsrping are thought by scientist to be orange tigers that carry the stripeless white gene as a recessive trait. In nature, white tigers, in fact, range from very dark, white to varying shades of orange.

The birth of the three Bengal Tigers at the Bali Zoo are welcome additions to a collection of over 350 animals living on the 9 hectare park.

[Bali Zoo Entry]
 


Baliís Rice Terraces a Part of World Heritage
UNESCO Confirms World Heritage Status for Bali Subak Irrigation System

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has finally ratified the Subak irrigation system in Bali and including it on the word heritage list during its just concluded 36th assembly in St. Petersburg, Russia.

As reported by the National News Agency Antara, the decision, reached by UNESCO on Friday, June 29, 2012, officially declared the subak irrigation and water distribution systems characterized by the picturesque rice terraces of western Bali as playing a central role in preserving Balinese culture.

The chief information officer at the Indonesian Embassy in Moscow, M. Aji Surya, who attended the UNESCO assembly, said that the battle for the inclusion of the Subak system on UNESCO’s World Heritage list has taken 12 years before it successful conclusion in St. Petersburg,

The Deputy Minister for Education and Culture, Windu Nuryanti, expressed her delight on the acceptance of the Subak system as part of the world’s cherished world heritage by UNESCO. Also on hand in Russian to hear the happy news was the regent of Badung A.A. Gede Agung and the regent of Gianyar Tjokorda Oka Artha Ardhana Sukawati.

Continuing, Windu expressed her thanks to all the countries that supported Indonesia’s efforts at UNESCO, saying, “This is a very historical event.”

Windu explained that the Subak system possesses “outstanding universal values” - part of a living cultural system still in operation in Bali.

Bali Subak system joins a list of other UNESCO World Heritage Sites and objects in Indonesia that include batik textiles, Keris (traditional daggers), the Hindu Prambanan temple, angklung musical instruments and karinding musical flutes from West Java.

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Many Kubu Beach Tourism Businesses in Bali Illegal
Villas and Hotels Along Kubu Beach in North Bali Threatened with Demolition For Violating Provincial Zoning Rules

Domestic and foreign investors have erected private and commercial villas, and small hotels up and down the beautiful Kubu Coast of Karangasem, East Bali.

On that shore, from the village of Tianyar Barat, the Bali Post reports that many foreign resident have built hotel and villas that may now face destruction. The Post reports that there is even one investor preparing to build a five-star hotel next to a local cemetery.

The chairman of Commission B for the Karangasem House of Representatives (DPRD-Karangasem), Nyoman Oka Antara, told a special assembly on the provincial zoning law (RTRW) that he regretted repeated recommendations and requests for the beach area to be rezoned and declared a tourism zone have yet to receive a formal response from the regency of Karangasem or the provincial government of Bali.

In response, a special team appointed by the Regent of Karangasem told the press that, in fact, their recommendation to make Tianyar Barat Beach a tourism zone has been submitted to the provincial government who rejected the proposal.

A spokesman for the regency team, Sedana Merta, suggested the regency try, once again, to seek the approval of the provincial government. He did not dismiss, however, the possibility that any renewed effort to change the zoning of the beach would also face rejection.

Legislator Oka Antara, who is also a resident of Tianyar Barat Village, said that a Dutch resident had built a villa on Telaga Beach and lived in the area for many years that is technically an illegal structure.

In that area, Antara said, all the villas and melati-class hotels now in operation are illegal due to their inability to obtain the necessary permits, including building permits (IMB). The area in which the hotel and villas stand is not zoned for commercial accommodation making all the building subject to demolition if the current law is enforced.

“The buildings are illegal. If the judicial team or enforcement teams acted in accordance with the rules and ordered the buildings demolished, they would have to be torn down,” explained Antara.

With the provincial government refusing to change the zoning status of the area, Antara expressed the wish that provincial authorities, before rejecting rezoning requests, first visit and inspect the area.

Adding irony to the mix, because of the ongoing administrative impasse, Oka explained that the many villas and hotels along the beach do not pay taxes due to the lack of legal standing for the businesses.

Looming in the background is the added problem that were the area eventually rezoned for tourist accommodation, many of the existing villas along this stretch of beach in North Bali violate mandatory set back rules of 100 meters from the high water mark, making it still impossible for the busiensses to obtain building permits on an ex post facto basis.
 


Putting Out the Welcome Mat for Indonesians
Indonesian Officials and Diplomats Now Visa-Free to 29 Countries

The Jakarta Globe reports that Indonesias holding official or diplomatic passport  can now visit 29 countries without obtaining a visa beforehand.

Information provided by the Indonesian Department of Foreign Affairs announced under the terms of bi-lateral agreements with the subject nations, Indonesians officials and diplomats can visit the following countries on a visa-free basis:

  • Switzerland
  • Slovenia
  • Bosnia Herzegovina
  • Belarus
  • 

Malaysia, (30 days) 
  • Singapore (30 days)
  • Thailand (30 days by air, 15 Days by land)
  • Philippines (21 days)
  • Vietnam (30 days)
  • 
Brunei (14 days)
  • Hong Kong (30 days)
  • Macau (30 days)
  • Morocco (90 days) 
  • Peru (90 days)
  • Chile (60 days) 
  • Ecuador (90 days)
  • Iran (15 days)
  • Maldives (30 days)
  • Sri Lanka (30 days)
  • Cook Islands (31 days) 
  • Micronesia (30 days)
  • Samoa (30 days)
  • Bermuda (180 days)
  • Colombia (90 days)
  • Dominica (21 days)
  • Haiti (90 days) 
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines (30 days)
  • Seychelles (30 days)
  • Kosovo (90 days)


Hyatt Celebrates its People
Bali Hyatt on Sanur Beach Salutes Their Most Valuable Asset: Their Employees

Bali Hyatt on Sanur Beach recently showed appreciation to its workers at an event entitled “Celebrating Our People” as part of a global event by Hyatt Hotels and Resorts.

At the Bali Hyatt, the “Celebrating Our People” week ran from June 17-22, 2012 and featured an entire range of activities including the preparation of Balinese “Banten” offerings and a contest pitting skills in the preparation of a Balinese culinary favorite – suckling pig. The week also included sporting competitions in table tennis, volleyball, billiards, chess and futsal. Meanwhile, other members of the team competed in painting competitions, participated in blood donation drives and took quizzes to test product knowledge.

As part of Hyatt’s continuing commitment to the community, Bali Hyatt made social visits to State Elementary School No.2 in Selat, Klungkung regency, donating stationery supplies, uniforms and wooden tables and chairs for the school. While visiting the island’s north, the Hyatt employees continued their journey to East Seraya in Karangasem regency where they donated much-needed water tanks.

Marking the opening day of the week of festivities was a balloon release and family fun walk. Children joined in competitive games following the fun walk. During the event, door prizes were also given to staff members.

The “Celebrating Our People” week ended on June 22, 2012 with a variety of food stalls, door prizes, live music and a special Balinese comedy show at the Rinjani Hall at the Bali Hyatt presented for the shared enjoyment of the hotel’s hard-working team.

[Book a Stay at the Bali Hyatt]




How You Gonna Keep Down on the Farm?
Tourism Village Development Can Reduce the Marginalization of the Balinese in the Tourism Development Process

In the midst of Bali’s unprecedented building boom of new hotels, condotels and villas there is a growing demand, particularly among European visitors, for accommodation options in village settings.

As reported by Kompas.com, this developing trend has elicited offers to help develop such accommodation options for varying sources, including Bank Indonesia, the Bali Hotels Association and a number of public-minded organizations. Complementing the growing demand for a “village atmosphere” from foreign tourists is the mounting resentment on the part of many Balinese, complaining that they have become mere spectators in tourism development dominated by non-Balinese investors.

Ketut Gambar, the village chief of Kendran in Tegallalang, Gianyar regency, said: “We have become increasing aware that we are just spectators and, what’s worse, we are being pushed off our own lands. For this reason we are continually trying to advance ourselves by managing our tourism village (desa wisata) in a professional manner.”

Gambar and his fellow villagers feel it is unjust that foreign tourists enjoy the natural panoramic vistas provided by their community without villagers receiving any financial contribution from tourism.

Admitting his village needs expert outside advice, the people of Kendran are adamant that the essential character of their area must be preserved. Gambar added: “Basically, we want to maintain the village lands, particularly the rice fields, ensuring they do not change their original function. We are hoping that local tour companies will become our partner.”

He said that his villagers were working not to be seduced by high prices being offered by investors for their ancestral lands. The current market price for land in the village is approaching Rp. 100 million (US$10,750) per are (100 square meters). Locals are attempting to only enter into rental agreements with candidate investors.

Meanwhile, the Executive Director of the Bali Hotels Association (BHA) Djinaldi Gosana confirmed the growing demand for rural and village settings among Bali visitors. He also commended the governments “Desa Wisata” (Tourism Village) initiative as a means of ensuring a more equitable distribution of the benefits of tourism development.

Said Gosana, ”We (BHA) are supporting and providing guidance to tourism villages to help them manage their communities and provide a safe and enjoyable experience for visitors.”

Bank Indonesia and Bali Hotels Association recently undertook to provide equipment and training to seven tourism villages.


Bali: Limited Seating Available
Former Indonesian Tourism Minister Want Bali to Limit Number of Tourist Visitors

Former Indonesian Minister and a member of the United Nations World Tourism Organization’s Committee on Tourism Ethics, I Gde Ardika, has called on the provincial government of Bali to consider limiting the number of both domestic and international tourists allowed to visit Bali due to the island’s limited carrying capacity.

Ardika warns Bali that it is grievously wrong if it believes it can accommodate a limitless number of tourism visitors. As reported by Beritabali.com, Ardika says now is the time for Bali to put quality of tourist visitors before the desire of merely seeking mere quantity.

Ardika said the qualitative approach to tourism does not mean seeking only high-spending visitors, but emphasizes seeking visitors who hold the cultural values of Bali in high esteem.

The highly respected tourism leader veteran says that as an island of limited area, Bali must inevitably face limits to tourism growth. For this reason, priority must be given to tourists who are in tune with the concept of developing cultural tourism on the island.


Fountains of Heritage
Baliís Tirta Empul Temple Wins Environmental and Cultural Award

A Houston (USA) environmental group – Green Yatra Action (GYAN) have honored the local community that manages Bali’s famous Tirta Empul complex near Tampaksiring, Gianyar.

Built in 926 AD during the Warmadewa dynasty that ruled Bali for nearly five centuries, Tirta Empul is a temple complex housing springs held sacred by all Balinese.

GYAN is a secular organization that seeks to “use the wisdom of Vedic Hindu teaching and the collective passion and ingenuity of the Vedic Hindu people” to address the global crisis of climate change.

The GYAN award for Tirta Empul Temple and its stewards was presented in Ubud, Bali on Saturday, June 30, 2012, by the organization’s president Dr. Ksum Vyas witnessed by the regent of Gianyar Cokorda Oka Artha Ardana Sukawati (Pak Cok) at the Puri Agung Palace.

The award was reportedly given because the Tirta Empul Temple Complex, located near the Tampaksiring Presidential Palace, exists in a beautiful, clean and environmentally balanced setting.

Teeming with tens of fountains fed by the sacred Pekerisan River, the Tirta Empul complex is only 50 kilometers from Bali’s capital of Denpasar, easily accessible from Bali’s tourist hotels in the south.

The President of GYAN used the award ceremony to also present an award to the Rector of Bali’s Mahendrata University, Dr. Shri I Gusti Ngurah Arya Wedakarna Mahendradatta Wedasteraputra Suyasa III, who serves on the International Honorary Advisory Board of GYAN.

The regent of Ginayar “Pak Cok” welcomed the recognition for Tirta Empul bestowed by GYAN, saying he hope the award would assist efforts underway to have the Tirta Empul complex listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.


By the Light of the Silvery Moon
Banyan Tree Ungasan Celebrates the Full Moon in Bali on July 5, 2012 with a Six-Course Menu and Special Musical Performance

On an island that marks the passage of time with the lunar calendar, full moon evenings are always special in Bali. Village streets across the island are filled with people in traditional costumes on their way to ondolan celebrations – the anniversary of a local temple always celebrated during the dawning of a full moon.

The full moon in Bali on July 5, 2012 will take on an added novelty for guests and visitors to the Banyan Tree Ungasan’s Ju-Ma-Na Restaurant where their team of world-renowned chefs are preparing an elaborate six-course degustation menu.

The night’s dinner, under a full moon while suspended high upon a cliff over the crashing waves of the Indian Ocean, will be punctuated by the music of Krescendo with a special guest appearance by the scintillating violinist Gladys.

The Menu

Crusted Yellow Fin Tuna
gojuchan marinated tuna toro, grilled aubergine caviar, daikon and cucumber salad

***

Scallops
crustacean veloute, sweet corn mousseline, Avruga caviar

***

Seared Foie Gras
caramelized packham pear, baby mache salad, nuts crumble

***

Australian Wagyu Beef No. 9

Root vegetables, port wine sauce, truffle foam

***

brie de melun “fermier” AOC
apple and radish salad, apricot confiture

***

70% valrhona grand cru soft chocolate cake
almond croustillant, fleur de sel, orange spaghetti, raspberry sorbet

Price Rp. 990,000 ++ per person (US$129)

Dinner is served from 6:30 pm – 11:00 pm.

Advance reservations for this special evening are highly recommended.

Banyan Tree Ungasan
Jl. Melasti, Banjar Kelod,
Ungasan, Bali 80364

Telephone ++62-(0)361 3007000 or ++62-(0)361704477

[Email for Reservations or Information

[Book a Stay at Banyan Tree Ungasan]


Grandma or the Big Bad Wolf?
Grandmaís House in Legian Facing Growing Zoning Problems as Under-Construction Hotel Accused of Standing Too Close to Roadway

Radar Bali has again put Grandma’s Hotel in Legian on its screen, reporting that the hotel under construction on the corner of Jalan Sriwijaya and Jalan Melasti has escaped definite action by officials despite fundamental violations of zoning rules.

As reported on Balidiscovery.com [See: To Grandmother’s House We Go], the Badung government has received two formal warnings for significant zoning violations from the regency’s zoning board. A third warning, according to procedures in place, is automatically issued if the cited zoning deficiencies are not addressed. A third warning can also precipitate a possible closing of the subject business.

Latest news reports are focusing on Grandma’s Hotel in Legian violation of mandatory set back rules from major road way that stipulate a distance of 24 meters between a building and the adjacent road’s centerline.

Wayan Puspa Negara, a member of Badung’s House of Representatives (DPRD-Badung), said: “It’s clear to the eye that (Grandma’s Hotel) is violating the setback rule. Just look, the building is touching the electrical pole.”

Puspa Negara is demanding that the Badung Zoning Authority (DCK-Badung) take action. The legislator is concerned that the construction continues and is nearing completion on a building whose street-facind facades should be demolished. “There’s been no action. Building continues. Nothing’s been done,” he complained.

[Book a Stay at Grandma Hotel in Seminyak]


The Magani Opens in Legian, Bali
The 108-room Magani Hotel and Spa Celebrates a ĎSoft Openingí in Legian, Bali

The owners and operators of the popular [Bali Niksoma Boutique Beach Resort]  in Legian, inaugurated another luxury property in Legian during a gala dinner and cocktail party on Sunday, July 1, 2012, held at The Magani.

The Hotel is in a “soft-opening” phase with all aspects of the property expected to be fully operational in August 2012.

The Magani offers 108 rooms spread over three categories: 67 deluxe rooms, 7 deluxe suites, 20 premier pool rooms with private plunge pools and 14 Magani Suites with outdoor Jacuzzis. Every room has modern chic decors, plasma TVs, walk-in showers, hair dryers, coffee/tea making facilities, in-room refrigerator mini-bar, and Wi-Fi access.

All rooms are built around a central courtyard that is home to the hotels large swimming pool with a swim-up bar. An adjacent kiddies pool is also available.

Other facilities include a restaurant and bar with both enclosed and alfresco seating for up to 400 diners; a sophisticate spa offering a full range of therapies’ including ayurvedic treatments; and a conference room able to accommodate 200 in a classroom configuration.

The hotel’s restaurant – Mozzarella – features the same extensive menu and attractive prices found at the two other popular Mozzarella outlets operated by the owning company.

[Book a Stay at The Magani]
 


Nikko Bali Celebrates Bali Culture
Best Acts from 34th Bali Arts Festival in Command Performance on Tuesday, July 3rd at Nikko Bali Resort and Spa

Sustaining a tradition of cultural appreciation commence seven years ago, the Nikko Bali Resort and Spa is staging another cultural appreciation night on Tuesday, July 3, 2012, featuring outstanding performances from the 34th Bali Arts Festival now underway in the island's capital of Denpasar. 

Opening the event, a performance at the resort’s Kupu Kupu Amphitheater will feature the “Best of Bali” with five dance performances: Pendet Dance, Baris Tunggal, Legong Keraton, Teruna Jaya and Oleg Temulilingan.

One of Bali’s premier dance maestros, Ni Ketut Arini, will also make a special guest appearance that promises to form the highlight of the evening.

The opening night of the “Best of the Best” starts at 07.00 pm.

For a Rp 480,000 (US$ 52) attendees will enjoy outstanding dance performances and an authentic Balinese buffet.

Guests will also be given a complimentary sarong, sash or udeng (traditional Balinese headdress for males) to wear as they join an unique celebration of Balinese cuisine and culture.

Weekly events featuring other outstanding acts from the 34th Annual Bali Arts Festival are planned each week during the months of July and August 2012.

Magical Barong Dance
On Tuesdays: July 10, 17, 24 and 31
7::00 pm - 9:30 pm
Rp. 450,000  (US$48.50)

Legong Dance
On Fridays: Julu 6, 13, 20 and 27
7:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Rp. 450,000 (US$48.50


[Email for Reservation, Complete Schedule and More Information

Telephone: ++62-(0)361-773377

[Book a Stay at the Nikko Bali Resort and Spa]


The Moveable Feast
Bali Best Chefs Launches Series of Dinners Featuring Outstanding Cuisine by Islandís Best Chefs Presented in Outstanding Setting

The idea behind the series of moveable feasts launched on June 22, 2012 at [Jimbaran’s Longhouse] by Bali’s Best Chefs was to take the concept of intimate dinner parties beyond the living room into new and heretofore uncharted territory.

The inaugural event treated 12 carefully selected guests to a meal prepared by one of the island’s most skillful chefs, wine pairings selected and presented by a leading sommelier and a palatial setting atop the hills of the Bali’s southernmost Ungasan peninsula.

Conceived by photographer Deborah Cayetano, each event in the dining series must not only be exceptional for the food and wine presented, but also appealing to the eye. By bringing together like-minded travelers and residents for an evening of fine wine, excellent food, and interesting conversation she is leading a slow-food crusade to reestablish fine dining as one of life’s purist pursuits.

The inaugural night, like the nights to follow in what Deborah promises will become a monthly event, left participants unaware of the identity of the other guests until they actually arrived at the extended cocktail hour in a grand living room offering sweeping views over Jimbaran Bay. Given the careful attention to detail, there was definitely a sense of “Bali meets Hollywood" as the sublime evening unfolded.

The Longhouse, chosen as the launching pad for the first “Bali’s Best Chefs” event is a six bedroom villa high in the Jimbaran hills.

“ I chose a very diverse group of guests who would not necessarily come into contact with each other although all live in Bali. Chef Vincent of [Warisan Restaurant]  created a wonderfully luxurious appetizer menu to precede the dinner, the conversation flowed as easily as the delicious South African red and white wines from [Zero Spirits] ,” said Deborah.

The evening’s fare debut with appetizing canapés such as gratin scallops with leek and fennel; Wagyu rolls stuffed with foie gras in black truffle oil; and prawn sate with ginger caramel sauce and crispy gyoza stuffed with snail and shitake.

These were accompanied by crisp South African Simonsig Kaapse Sparkling wine.

The dinner began with a black cod sashimi with a honey mustard dressing and prawn ceviche followed by pink oven-roasted lamb rack.

The evening’s fare ended with a dessert comprised of five different quality chocolates.

The “ambassadors” attending the premiere event nominated future privileged invitees.

Coming events and their details are kept tightly under wraps but think luxurious garden parties, and private beach soirees hosted by the best chefs on the island, washed down with the finest wines.

Deborah is intent on establishing a new way to enjoy fine dining by redefining the eating experience in Bali.

[Email for information on Bali’s Best Chefs]

Telephone +62- (0)8786 204 1774.


 
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Bali Update #631
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Bali Update #630
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Bali Update #629
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Bali Update #628
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Bali Update #627
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Bali Update #626
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Bali Update #625
September 01, 2008

Bali Update #624
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Bali Update #623
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Bali Update #622
August 11, 2008

Bali Update #621
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Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
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Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
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Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
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Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
June 02, 2008

Bali Update #611
May 26, 2008

Bali Update #610
May 19, 2008

Bali Update #609
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Bali Update #608
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Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
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Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
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Bali Update #601
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #600
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
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Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
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Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
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Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
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Bali Update #581
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Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
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Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
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Bali Update #573
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Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
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Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
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Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
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Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
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Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
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Bali Update #511
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Bali Update #510
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Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
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Bali Update #506
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Bali Update #505
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Bali Update #504
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Bali Update #503
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Bali Update #502
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Bali Update #501
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