Bali Discovery Tours: Homepage
Bali Hotels, Bali Villas and Bali News from balidiscovery.com
Home Bali Contact Bali Practicalities Bali News Bali Services Bali Transportation Bali Sports Bali Excursions Bali Villas Bali Hotels
Home · News · Bali Update · Archive
Bali Hotels, Bali Villas and Bali News from balidiscovery.com
Bali Hotels
Bali Villas
Special Deals!
Packages
MICE Handling
Bali Excursions
Culinary - Dining
Guided Tour
Bali Spas
Bali Sports
Diving
Golf
Bali Transportation
Car Rental - Selft Drive
Private Jet Charter
Bali News
Bali Services
Bali Practicalities
Bali Contact
Bali Career
Home
 
Bali Update
Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter!
 
PATA header
PATA Gold Award 2007
Bali Update
PATA Gold Award Winner 2007
 
Bali Contact
Bali Discovery Tours
Komplek Pertokoan
Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
Sanur, Bali, Indonesia

Tel:
++62 361 286 283

Fax:
++62 361 286 284

U.S.A. Fax:(toll free)
1-800-506-8633

U.K. Fax:
++44-20-7000-1235

Australian Fax:
++61-2-94750419

24h:
++62 812 3819724

Bali Discovery

SITE PATA ASITA
Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #946 - 20 October 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


In the Best of Taste
Chef Teuku Kelana Champions Indonesian Cuisine as Executive Chef of Swiss-Belhotel Rainforest, Kuta, Bali

Prior to traveling to Bali as part of the pre-opening team at the Swiss-Belhotel Rainforest, Kuta in August 2012, executive chef Teuku Kelana had already established a distinguished track record as maestro of the Indonesian and international kitchen.

Born in Lhokseumawe Aceh in 1968, Teuku earned a culinary arts degree from the Sahid Tourism Academy in 1990 before landing his first job in the Hyatt Aryaduta in Jakarta. A determined professional, he quickly earned his stripes and a reputation for hard work and innovation, working his way through the ranks in the garde manger, banquet kitchen, coffee shop kitchen and finally in the well-regarded "Ambiente" Italian Fine Dining Restaurant.

In 1991, Chef Kelana assumed the job of chef de partie in the Seafood Terrace Coffee Shop at the Grand Hyatt Jakarta. In November 1996, The Sheraton Bandara at Jakarta’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport beckoned, and the talented North Sumatran became their executive sous chef, helping that hotel earned corporate recognition for “the best food quality in the Asia Pacific” in 2001. While at the Sheraton, Chef Kelana’s no-nonsense approach to quality control and procedural efficiency saw food costs reduced by 35% while at the same time earning high scores for service and food excellence from diners.

A top position as executive chef awaited Teuku at the Lido Aryaduta in Sukabumi in November 2002 where he proved himself both a talented chef and an inspired administrator by introducing new menus and a systematic approach to quality and cost control.

Passionate about food and eager to share his cooking skills, during his time at the Lido Aryaduta, Teuku earned the title of “Super Chef” on a nationally televised program “Allez Cuisine.

Leaving Sukabumi and returning to Jakarta in July 2003, Chef Kelana became executive sous chef at the Crowne Plaza before joining the Ambhara Hotel as executive chef in October 2006.

In 2007, chef Teuku Kelana returned to familiar ground at the Aryaduta Hotel Jakarta, a former employer eager to welcome him back as their executive sous chef.

In 2008 chef Kelana was credited with creating the Cardamon Buffet in the fine dining Asiatic Restaurant at Grand Indonesia mall where he worked concurrently as general manager and executive chef.

In recent years he has helped host Resto Sedap on Global TV; cooked with foreign ambassadors from Croatia, New Zealand, Austria, Norway, Pakistan, South Africa, Argentina and Sweden on Metro TV; served as guest chef on Master Chef with RCTI;  appears on a monthly basis as a guest chef on the METRO TV 8-11 show; and recently published his own Indonesian cookery book “Padu Padan Ala Chef” containing more than 150 recipes.

Chef Kelana serves as national secretary general of the Indonesian Chef Association (ICA).

A busy father of three children who enjoys reading and sports, Chef Kelana is enjoying his latest assignment at on the Island of the Gods in charge of the kitchens at the Swiss-Belhotel Rainforest, Kuta including the renowned Oak Restaurant that has quickly earned a reputation for its outstanding local cuisine.
 


The Honor to Dine
Bali’s Mozaic Grastronomique Restaurants Named to San Pellegrino’s List of Asia's Best 50 Restaurants

San Pellegrino’s list of the 50 Best Restaurants in Asia – 2013 was announced at a lavish ceremony held on February 25, 2013 at the Marina Sands in Singapore.

Organized and compiled by William Reed Media, the recognition of Asia’s Best Restaurants is made based on the votes of over 900 recognized international leaders in the restaurant industry and a panel of 36 experts drawn from food critics, chefs, restaurateurs and "foodies."

Winning top honors among Asia’s Best 50 eateries was Narisawa Restaurant from Japan, followed by Nihonryori Ryugin from Tokyo, Nahm from Bangkok, Amber from Hong Kong and Andre’s from Singapore. In all, the 50 winners hail from 25 different geographical locations.

Coming in at #50 on the list and the sole Bali restaurant to make the perstigious list is Mozaic Restaurant Gastronomique of Ubud, adding another award to its growing litany of accolades, including its recent hallowed return inclusonon the Miele Guide’s listing of outstanding dining establishments.

In naming Bali to the list of 50 best Asian restaurants, San Pellegrino cited the key role played by Mozaic’s founder, chef Chris Salans, saying, “Salans has not only built Mozaic into Bali’s finest restaurant, but has made it a genuine global gastronomic destination.”

In response, chef owner Chris Salans replied: “I am thrilled to see Mozaic listed on the Best 50 restaurants list and being bestowed the honor of the best Indonesia. Our team is over the moon with this privilege. I hope to see more Indonesia on the list in the next few years, because we have great chefs here, and fantastic fresh ingredients to inspire us.”

[San Pellegrino Complete List of Winners]



Got the Message?
17-Year-Old Balinese Girl Pays the Price for Texting While Driving a Motorcycle

A motorcycle driven by a young Balinese woman collided into a car on the road between Denpasar and the West Bali port of Gilimanuk on Thursday, February 28, 2013, sending 17-year-old Diah Yusmira Dewi to the intensive care unit of the Tabanan General Hospital with a broken leg and other injuries.

According to Ni Luh Tresnawati - a 17-year-old female companion riding pillion with Diah, the driver of the motorcycle was reading an SMS message when the accident occurred.

The State News Agency Antara reports that the motorcycle being driven at a high rate of speed struck the back of a pick-up truck. The motorcycle caught on fire after the collision in the village of Sembung, Kerambitan, Tabanan.

Another motorcycle coming from the opposite direction driven by 22-year-old Puput Julianto collided with the first motorcycle. Puput suffered broken bones and passenger abrasions in the accident that also saw his motorcycle destroyed by fire when the gasoline contained in the vehicles tank caught fire.


The Foreign Legion of Legian
Bali Police Seeking Two Foreign Men Who Went on Shooting Spree in Legian, Kuta

The Kuta-Legian area of Bali added another layer of unwanted notoriety when two gun-toting men, believed to be foreign nationals, shot out the windows of a car parked on Jalan Sri Rama in Legian on Wednesday, February 2, 2013.

Eye witnesses to the incident said that two “foreign men” on a motorcycle, both of whom appeared to be intoxicated, shot out the windows of a Honda Jazz sedan and a taxi parked on the road’s shoulder.

Quoted in Kompas.com, Andi Purwanto, one of the eyewitnesses, said: “there was a noise of ‘tak, tak’ twice and then the two men weaved off to the south.”

The head of the Kuta police precinct, I Putu Gede Dedy Ujiana, explained, “The exact type of weapon used and the motive remain a mystery; the perpetrators are still being sought by police.”

There were no human casualties in the incident.

At the scene of the shooting police recovered evidence that indicates an air pistol or air rifle was used. Police continue to interview eyewitnesses and speak with the owners of the damaged cars in an effort to apprehend those responsible.
 


Participatory Democracy, Please
Bali Tourism Leaders Call for a More Inclusive Form of Leadership by Bali’s Next Governor

Leading players in Bali’s tourism industry feel they have not been invited to participate in policy making matters related to the Island’s tourism, despite their sizeable contribution to the local economy.

As reported by Beritabali.com, a shared view of non-involvement in tourism policies was enunciated by tourism managers who attended a forum held on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 organized by the Indonesian Tourism Association of Bali (GIPI).

The complaint was leveled by tens of tourism stakeholder at Bali’s current vice-governor Anak Agung Puspayoga, now actively running for the office of Bali’s governor at a morning forum organized by Bali's travel industry..

In opening remarks, the former chairman of the Bali Tourism Board (BTB), Bagus Sudibya, reminded the gubernatorial candidate that tourism represents the very lifeblood of the Island’s economy with more than 650,000 workers employed in the sector.

Subibya complained that the tourism sector has been the recipient of many promises made by those seeking the governor’s seat, only to see those promises soon forgotten once the election is over and the candidate becomes governor.

“This has saddened us. We feel as though there is the annual lottery in which when the candidates wants something, then ask us to attend and provide input. Our comments are all written down as if they will soon be followed up by the government,” complained Sudibya at the forum on the impact of tourism on Bali’s macro economy and the creative economy at which candidate Puspayoga was the featured guest.

He also bemoaned that a complicated government bureaucracy makes it problematic for those working in the tourism sector to obtain information connected to government policies. Sudibya told the assembly that it is, in fact, the government’s responsibility to communicate policies and regulations to the public and the tourism community.

Continuing, Sudibya said: “We are forced to wait for a long time, confronting the bureaucracy. We dream what it might be like to sit together with our leaders in a relaxed atmosphere where we can openly provide input and our ideas for the development of Bali’s tourism.”

He underlined that Bali tourism contributes around 40% of the national economy when, at the same time, Bali’s land mass is only around 0.2% of the entire land area of Indonesia.

Bali has been designated by the government as “Corridor V” for the Master Plan for the Acceleration and Expansion of the Indonesian Economy (MP3EI) – focusing on agriculture and tourism. Under the MP3EI program Rp. 67 trillion (US$66.7 million) has been allocated for Bali, West Nusa Tenggara and East Nusa Tenggara.

“Nonethess, until now we have not been invited to discuss what will be done with this large sum. If these funds are divided equally between the three regions and Bali gets Rp. 20 trillion or more, we are prepared to lend our ideas,” said Sudibya.

Sudibya said that Bali tourism has contributed Rp. 45 trillion (US$45 million) in foreign exchange to the national tourism economy.

Meanwhile, the provincial tax proceeds from the hotel and restaurant sector in Bali totals Rp. 4.5 trillion (US$4.5 million).

On behalf of his fellow colleagues in Bali’s tourism sector, Sudibya reminded those running for governor to invite tourism players to sit down and discuss how state revenues will be used to assist the public.


Bali No Longer the Top Choice for an Australian Holiday
Australians Increasingly Choosing the U.S.A. Over Bali for an Overseas Holiday

[The Age from Australia]  reports that Bali has been displaced by the U.S.A. from its pole position as the most favored overseas holiday destination for Australians.

Citing plentiful air access and a strong Australian dollar as key influencers, Australian visitors to America in 2012 increased 18% while the number of Australians visiting Bali was up just 3%.

In compiling the figures, The Age looked at the number of Australian’s purchasing insurance covers from Cover-More.

Those questioning the results have raised doubt about statistics' validity, pointing out that while many Australian still chance a trip to Bali without an insurance cover, the extremely high cost of medical treatment in the U.S.A. tends to make such coverage an absolute necessity and less of an option for Australian travelers.

Also on the increase, according to the study, are cruise holidays ex-Australia.

In the report, Bali came in second place as an overseas destination for Australians, followed by Thailand, England and Fiji.

Up and coming destinations for Australian holidaymakers are Japan, China, the Philippines and Vietnam – all recording strong rates of growth in Australian visitors in 2012.

Flight Centre said their records confirmed the insurer’s findings, claiming Bali began losing out to the U.S.A. two years ago.


No Peeking Allowed
St. Regis Resort Bali Marks Earth Hour with a Dinner and Wine Pairing Served in the Dark

Originally conceived by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and first celebrated in Sydney in 2007, Earth Hour is now observed in most nations around the world.

2013 Earth Hour will take place on Saturday, March 23rd between 8:30-9:30 pm local time – wherever you are in the world.

During that hour, the citizens of the world are encouraged to go back to nature by turning off all electrical appliances as a humbling wave of darkness circulates around the globe.

In the process, it is hoped that people everywhere will realize the importance of making a smaller carbon footprint in the effort to control the dramatic climate change now threatening the planet.

Proving that Earth Hour need not be a solemn affair and can also include a celebration of the precious bounty of the planet, the St. Regis Resort Bali in Nusa Dua is organizing a journey from light into darkness culminating in a decadent sensory culinary experience “in the dark” at the Kayuputi Restaurant.

The St. Regis Earth Hour countdown commences shortly after sunset in the Hotel’s Lobby for a sacred fire ritual dance performance.

Guests will the be blindfolded and escorted by the fire dancers to the seaside Kayuputi Restaurant where a Chef Agung Gede will challenge guests palates and sensory discretion via a “blind tasting” of a special five-course degustation menu replete with wine pairings and culminating with dark chocolate Martinis.

Those celebrating Earth Hour at the St. Regis Resort Bali pay only Rp. 1.6 million per person (US$160) including the 5-course blind menu, accompanying wine pairings and chocolate martinis.

The special Earth Hour Blind Tasting will be held in the Mezzanine of the Kayuputi Restaurant.

In order not to be left out in the light on the momentous occasion, reservations are essential and can be made by calling the Kayuputi Restaurant at ++62-(0) 361-3006768 of [Email] 

[Website Earth Hour

[St. Regis Bali]
 


Taps for Taps
Bali Water Officials Leaving Jimbaran Residents High and Dry

Bali Daily (The Jakarta Post) reports on the continuing water crisis affecting residents and businesses located on Bali’s southern most areas of Jimbaran and Ungasan.

Liberally peppered with luxury villas and five-star resorts, sufficient clean water remains a daily struggle for those living in this area, particularly those of limited economic means who find the continual need to purchase water from outside source economically crippling.

The words of Wayan Sukamta, a resident of Buana Gubug in Jimbaran, serve to underline the daily struggle for water of the area’s poor: “It does not feel right to me that we have to fight with our friends and neighbors to get just one gallon of free clean water from the water tanker.” Sukamta, a former neighborhood chief, decries the lack of water in his area of the Badung regency, known worldwide for its flourishing tourism sector.

Exasperated, Sukamta adds, 

“I can’t fight with them, I just choose to buy refill drinking water when there’s not enough water at home for bathing.”

Five of 14 hamlets in Jimbaran - Buana Gubug, Cenggiling, Mekarsari, Anggaswara and Taman Griya face a daily struggle for water for more than a year.

“The water distribution here has always been on and off, despite the fact that we have to pay a lot to PDAM for the water we scarcely get,” said Sukamta. 



In all, nearly 4,000 families are affected by the inability of the State Water Board (PDAM) to provide a dependable.

“All of these families are customers of PDAM, which serves as the only source of clean water here. There’s no ground water because this is a limestone hill,” explained Sukamta.

Reni Susanti Radi of Cenggilling hamlet, located between Jimbaran and Pecatu, said she has purchased two gallons of water each day for showering and other basic needs. This leaves her without water for much of the day, with water from PDAM typically only available between midnight and 6:00 am.

A resident in Jimbaran for six years, Reni complains that there is little rhyme or reason to the schedule used by PDAM to turn off water supplies to the area. “During the dry season last year, only God knows how often PDAM shut down the water supply with no proper announcement. Water was only available, and only with very little pressure, for a few hours every day. Two to three days without running water is becoming a normal thing. During the last three days, I have barely had normal water supply. It was off for over 24 hours, then the pressure never came back to normal,” said Reni.



Many economically limited residents do not have the funds to install water tanks and auxiliary pumps, resorting to buying small amounts of water from local water suppliers.

PDAM freely admits it is overwhelmed with the large number of customers seeking water supplies in South Bali. Wayan Sukaryawan, the chief of PDAM for South Kuta, admits: 
“Around 400 applicants as of January are still in our waiting list. We are postponing their approval to become customers until we can complete the installation of more water pipes.”

Sukaryawan added: 

“Our current water pipe infrastructure is insufficient. Thus, since last October we have been installing additional pipe networks. But the installation work will take time, another three months.”

In the meantime, local residents are being urged to have a two-day supply of water to sustain them over the periodic shut-offs of water until a proper supply can be extended to the area.

“We will inform the neighborhood and banjar heads of the schedule,” said Sukaryawan, assuring water tankers would be sent to locations where residents most needed free water.

Requests for water delivery can be made via PDAM Kuta Selatan by calling 0361-701576.

Of some concern, the director of PDAM Badung, I Nyoman Sukanada, claims he had no knowledge of any water shortage in the Balagan area.

Related Articles

[Water Water Everywhere]

[Cool, Clear, Water]

[A Bitter Taste]



Shaken, Not Stirred
Sundara Introduces Signature Cocktails by Barcelona’s Celebrated Mixologist Javier de las Muelas

Image to Enlarge
In fact, Sundara appeal is such is that it can literally be downright intoxicating.

To achieve its rightful place at the pinnacle of Bali’s lively nightlife scene, Four Seasons invited Barcelona’s celebrated cocktail master Javier de las Muelas and his trainers to spend an entire month at the Resort creating recipes and training the staff at Sundara.

“Javier’s company, DRY, is at the leading edge of cocktails internationally,” says Michael Branham, general manager of Four Seasons Resort Bali at Jimbaran Bay. “We wanted to bring that spirit of creativity and innovation here to Bali to elevate the island’s standard of mixology.”

Javier de las Muelas is known for creating avant-garde cocktails – combining intricate preparations, unique textures and complex flavors. He owns internationally influential Barcelona bars, such as Gimlet and Dry Martini, and also serves internationally as a consultant and trainer. He is responsible for major cocktail trends including spoon cocktails (jelly shots), fresh fruit cocktails and a world-famous mojito recipe - as well as serving as the brand mixologist for Nespresso where he develops delicious coffee cocktails.

To complement the eclectic international cuisine at Sundara, de las Muelas has created an impressive cocktail menu, featuring his own refinements of classic favorites, as well as one-of-a-kind signature recipes.
“My inspiration for cocktails comes from both the destination and its ingredients,” says de las Muelas. “Sundara is very inspiring with its beachside setting and the beautiful mix of sea, sand and firelight. There’s a delicate sophistication here that’s very romantic.

Unique Balinese ingredients definitely play a role in his creations. For example, several Sundara cocktails feature local fruits such as star fruit and the island’s special passion fruit. Another intriguing ingredient is Balinese chili – inspiring las Muelas to make a vodka cocktail infused with chili that uses chili as a garnish.

Three cocktails by Javier de las Muelas stand out as Sundara’s Signature Cocktails:

• Jim-Let Fox-Trot is a modern variation on the traditional gimlet. The recipe involves creating a unique texture of gin, lime and spring water from a slushy machine, and topping a glass of tonic water and ice cubes with this cocktail mix. It’s a prime choice when lounging in the shade on the Sundara sundeck.

• Thousand Nights entices with a brilliant yellow reflecting the sun above Jimbaran Bay. The taste is delicate and exotic, combining diverse ingredients including star anise, green cardamom, passion fruit, limejuice and dark rum. It’s ideal for sipping at sunset or after dark when flaming torches light the beach.

• Coconut Rhapsody is a ripe and creamy cocktail, mixing coconut and gin. It’s refreshing and perfect for afternoons on the beach.

Sundara’s wine list has been prepared by staff sommelier Suryaveer Singh. The list includes 105 labels with a perfect balance of old and new world wines from both established and up-and-coming regions. Eleven select wines are available by the glass, while premium wines are conserved in state-of-the-art Le Verre de Vin. The wine list is presented on electronic tablets, making it fully interactive and informational.

With outstanding options for food and drink, Sundara offers the perfect mix of five-star flair and relaxed beach-club vibe.

[Four Seasons Resort at Jimbaran Bay]


Minta Ampun! Tanah Ampo!
East Bali’s Cruise Terminal Ambitions Sacrificed to Incompetence?

The Tanah Ampo Cruise Terminal in East Bali at Karangasem is increasingly becoming a source of acute embarrassment for that regency.

Jointly financed by the Central government (Rp. 90 billion), the province of Bali (Rp. 14.9 billion) and the regency who donated roads and land (value Rp. 5.99 billion) – the resulting facility has proven less than popular with cruise operators and the surrounding community at Tanah Ampo.

Poorly planned and with apparently little input from those knowledgeable in the needs of the cruise industry, the 154-meter-long finger pier is sorely inadequate to handle the size of the large cruise ships now calling on Bali. To remedy this shortcoming, the central government is promising the estimated additional Rp. 228 billion (US$2.28 million) needed to extend and strengthen the pier to a more serviceable 350-meters.

Should the government come forward with the additional funding some fear it will only be a case of “throwing good money after bad” as the longer pier will still not address the need for a massive breakwater needed to provide safe harbor on a shore line exposed to high seas for extended periods of the year.

Those familiar with ship’s operations also shake their heads in disbelief at the wasteful and amateurish approach local officials used in constructing the Tanah Ampo Cruise Terminal. In addition to building a dock wholly inadequate to the cruise ships the facility aspires to serve, questions are also raised about the shoddy floating jetty or pontoon meant to receive ships’ tenders, the placement of lighting appliance and bollard, and the water depth surrounding the pier.

The floating jetty has failed during a passenger disembarkation and been destroyed twice by high seas. 

This comedy of errors continues ashore where the construction of the passenger terminal is anything but "user friendly" - underlined by the fact that  access roads to the terminal by large passenger buses deployed for shore tours are too small.

Unimpressed with both the construction and management of the Tanah Ampo Cruise Terminal, local residents surrounding the port have stubbornly refused request by regency offciials to surrender farm lands for the construction of a parking lot, claiming promises of a profit share in the operation of the unpopular port represent a less-than-interesting financial inducement.

Meanwhile, while Tanah Ampo officials wasted time and money on their trial-and-error method of cruise ship terminal management, the port of Benoa in South Bali has been reaping great benefit from its protected harbor, superior location and its more pro-active approach to dealing with the international cruise industry.

While only one ship has anchored at Tanah Ampo in the first two months of 2013, during the same period Benoa has handled 10, targeting another 28 ships’ visit through the end of the year. Apparently, no cruise ships visits are scheduled at Tanh Ampo through the end of the year.

Ironically, many of the ships visiting Benoa in 2013 are doing so after cancelling plans to call at the troubled Tanah Ampo Cruise Terminal.

Related Articles and Sites

[Ship to Shore]

[No Parking on the Paddocks]

[Port Out, Starboard Home]

[Editorial: Beware of Rank Amateurs]

[Missing the Boat; Missing the Point]

[Who’s in Charge?]

[Blaming Mother Nature]

[Tanah Ampo: Not Ready for Royalty]

[What’s Up, Dock?]

[Cruise Ship Services in Bali]


Bali Blow by Blow
Strong Whirlwinds Damage Wide Areas Across Bali

Strong whirlwinds – known locally an “angin putting beliung” caused damage in several areas of Bali on Monday, February 25, 2013.

In Tabanan, West Bali, 15 homes and several other structures were damaged by high winds and falling trees.

On the opposite side of the island in Gianyar regency, falling trees also struck and damaged a number of houses.

Both incidents happened at around 3:00 pm on Monday afternoon.

In Tabanan, the winds blew in from a westerly direction. In the hamlet of Cekik, in the village of Berembeng, winds destroyed four chicken pens owned by Made Jimat. The winds leveled the large-scale chicken breeding facility and destroyed heating equipment powered by bottled gas, resulting in a fire that caused further damage. The total damage to the poultry production center was put at Rp. 500 million (US$50,000).

When the strong winds shifted to the east, they caused damage in the villages of Samsaman Kelod, Kukuh and Kerambitan – all in Tabanan. Four homes were severely damaged together with less formal housing used by local residents.

Also in Tabanan, at a cemetery in the village of Denbantas, a large tree believed to be more than 100-years-old fell over a main roadway. Traffic was disrupted between Tabanan and Penebel before local citizens managed to clear the road at 06:00 am the following morning.

High winds also played havoc with two Bali temples (pura) in the Kediri sub district: Pura Puseh Desa Pakramam Pandak Gede and Pura Puseh Pejaten. A seven-tiered ceremonial tower at Pura Puseh Desa Pakrama Pandak Gede was leveled by the strong winds. Damage to the two temples is put at hundred of millions of Rupiahs.

Still in Kediri, winds damaged homes in Capaka and Nyamu.

In the sub district of Marga in Tabanan, 5 large trees were felled near Alas Kedaton, temporarily closing access to that popular tourism destination.

Meanwhile, according to the Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPDB), eight points were affected by strong winds in the regency of Gianyar. A large tree that fell near Samplangan closed the road to Bukit Batu. Another tree fell at Banjar Sangguan Kawan near the Gunung Merta Temple. Elsewhere, a tree closed the main roadway for a period at Pengosekam. In Tulikup, a Banyan tree downed by the winds also closed a main highway.

At least four homes and several temples were badly damaged by falling trees in Gianyar, including a large and ancient Sawo tree that fell near Puri Gianyar that did damage to one of the outer building at the palace.

The Banyan tree that fell at Tulikup Village brought down power lines plunging the surrounding village into darkness.

In Bali’s north at Kalianget Village in Buleleng, a building used to process organic fertilizers owned by the Provincial Industrial and Trade Department was destroyed by high winds on Saturday, February 23, 2013. According to Denpost, the winds left the entire structure level with the ground.


Car 54 Where are You?
Bali Police Call for More Patrol Cars to Secure the APEC Conference

The Jakarta Post reports that the Bali Police complain that their current stock of patrol cars is inadequate to meet the needs for vehicles during the APEC Summit scheduled for September 2013.

Bali’s chief of police, Inspector General Arif Wachyunadi, told the press: "The number of patrol cars owned by the Bali Police will not be enough to support a large-scale international event like APEC."

According to General Wachyunadi, he calculates minimums of 92 patrol cars are needed to provide an escort of four cars for each of the official delegations from 23 countries. Half of this total requirement will be temporarily supplied from East Java and the West Nusa Tenggara police headquarters.

Another 20 cars are needed to safeguard the main event, while the Bali police only have three vehicles available for that deployment at this time.

Meetings are now underway with the National Police headquarters to secure sufficient police vehicles for the Summit.

Outside the lack of vehicles, Bali’s top policeman assured the public that his forces were well trained, well equipped and ready to safeguard the important APEC event.

Wachyunadi shared with the press plans to increase controls at all Island entrances prior to APEC and along all main protocol routes.

Intense security surveys and drills are underway at all hotels and major meeting venues slated for use by the official delegation.


Watch this Space
Intense Competition for Retail Space at Bali’s Airport

The Moodie Report, which tracks commercial offers in connection with airport operations, says nine companies are in intense competition for the commercial and duty free space at Bali’s Ngurah Rai Airport.

The new newly renovated airport is slated for completion in time for the APEC Summit in September 2013 following a US$280 million massive rebuilding program.

The modernized facility is seeking to become an airport of international standard by only allowing commercial space operators with proven expertise in the retail trade to take up outlets at the “new” airport. This decision has evoked protests from local traders who faced eviction from the airport, unable to meet the commercial pre-qualifications set forth in the bidding process.

Following protests by a group of current airport traders that included the brief blocking of an access road near the airport, an accord was recently reached that will provide commercial sales space for small and medium sized traders within the airport’s premises.

According to Moodie, the incumbent Inti Dufree Promosindo DFS is competing against Korean rivals Lotte Duty Free and HTSR Indonesia (Shilla Duty Free), as well as Flemingo, LS travel retail, Dufry, The Nuance Group, World Duty Free Group and Plaza Bali Heinemann – a partnership between local retailer Plaza Bali and Heinemann Asia Pacific.

Angkasa Pura I and GVK – the Indian Airport Group who will jointly manage the non-aeronautical aspects of the airport must now determine who will win the right to occupy commercial space comprised of:
  • International Departure: Walk-through store (1,142 square meters)
  • International Departure: Whisky store (308 square meters)
  • International Pier: Satellite (100 square meters) 
  • International Mezzanine: Crew store (154 square meters) 
  • International Arrival: Duty Paid Shop (500 square meters) 
Among the sales rights to be awarded are: Perfume & cosmetics, liquor & tobacco, confectionery & fine food

Related Articles

[A Fair Trade?]

[A Tender Trap]

[Shop ‘Till Your Shop Gets Dropped]

[Taking Care of Business]

[The Great Pre-tender]

[An Airport of Shopkeepers]


The Link Between Land and Culture in Bali
Former Gianyar Regent and Current PHRI Chairman Calls on Government to Stop Issuing Permits for New Hotel Projects

The government must take steps to protect land holdings in Bali.

This is the warning given by the chairman of the Bali Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI), Tjokorda Oka Artha Ardhana Sukawati (Cok Ace), who formerly held the office of regent of Gianyar, in comments made to the press on Friday, March 1, 2013.

Emphasizing that Bali’s land belongs to the people of Bali, Cok Ace said land is the asset that will allow the Balinese people to preserve and protect the Island’s tradition and culture.

Quoted by Bisnis Bali, Cok Ace said that large amounts of agricultural land have been diverted for use by villas. The increase in accommodation in Bali has resulted in the loss of land once owned by the Balinese once used for cultural practice.

Cok Ace said that tourism operators who are members of PHRI are sad to see the diminishing amount of agricultural lands in Bali. He contends that his fellow PHRI members never imagined Bali’s current situation and the sacrifices being made for tourist accommodation.

He said now is the time for the government to reduce permits  approvals for new accommodation and housing estates, especially on land that is still agriculturally productive. He warned that the loss of quality farming land will eventually reduce the earning capacity of the people of Bali, while the boom in new accommodation will result in less income from tourism resulting from unhealthy price competition and discounting.

He went on to warn that tourist accommodation in Bali has now turned into a business of property speculation with little regard for the island’s future or its tourism reputation.

In closing, Cok Ace said it is time for the people of Bali to be fully involved in developing the Island’s tourism. “The people of Bali must not become mere spectators, but must also become tourism practitioners,” said the PHRI chairman for Bali.
 


Jayaprana Loves Layonsari
Buleleng Regent Announces Plan to Enhance Historical Gravesite of Prince Jayaprana in North Bali

The regent of Buleleng, Putu Agus Suradnyana, has publicly pledged to beautify the gravesite of the ancient Balinese King Jayaprana.

In a story that dates back five centuries to a small Balinese kingdom known as Kalianget plagued by disease that decimated the local residents, including member of its royal household. It was during this time that the King discovered a small orphaned boy crying on the roadside mourning the loss of both his parents.

Moved by the boy’s circumstances, the King, who had lost his only Son to a plague, adopted the waif.

The boy, Jayaprana, was raised in the palace by the King as his own son and elevated to the role of Crown Prince. Known for his humility and unpretentious interactions with the people, Japayprana grew into manhood and fell in love with Layonsari - a flower seller from the local market

As the story is told, Jayaprana’s adoptive father,  the King, was also smitten with the Jayaprana's new bride - the beautiful Layonsari. Determined to have Layonsari for his own, the King fiendishly plotted to have his Son killed in battle.

Jayaprana learned of the deadly plot against his life from Patih Sawung Galing - the palace soldier assigned by the King to take his life. Torn between the love for his wife Layonsari and his deep affection and obedience to his Father, the King, Jayaprana willingly offered his life to his assassin. Preparing for death, Jayaprana adorned his hair with flowers, handing them one by one to the man assigned to take his life, and then offered his own sword to Galing in order that the King’s evil wishes might be fulfilled.

The tearful assassin killed Jayaprana after which, it is told, the Prince’s body and surrounding forest were immediately enveloped in sweet perfume. A white tiger then suddenly appeared at the scene of the murder and killed Patih Sawung Galing.

When Layonsari heard of her beloved Jayaprana’s death, she followed her husband and took her own life. Mysteriously, the same sweet scent that had permeated the jungle where her husband died, now also imbued her death scene and the surrounding palace grounds.

Remorseful for his role in the death of Jayaprana and Layonsari, the heartbroken King resigned himself to a life seclusion for the rest of his days.

The grief stricken people resolved to unite the lovers in death and brought Layonsari's body to the jungle clearing where here husband had died in order that the two lovers might be buried side-by-side. Also buried there was Jayaprana’s assassin, Patih Sawung Galing, whose duty is now to guard the graves of Jayaprana and Layonsari for eternity.

The graves of Jayaprana and Layonsari are located at Teluk Terima, near the seaside in Buleleng only a short distance from the main roadway. Today the couple is commemorated with statues of Jayaprana and his beloved wife standing in quiet witness at the burial site. Located about 45 kilometers form Pulaki Temple, the gravesites are situated in the West Bali National Park and afford excellent views of nearby Menjangan island.

The Regent’s plans are to preserve the romantic story of Jayaprana by upgrading the burials site, a popular place of pilgrimage by Balinese; particularly young couples preparing to be wed.

“By enhancing the site,” said Suradnyana, “ I hope that the burial place of Jayaprana can become a tourist attraction in Buleleng." He said he also hoped every sub district in Buleleng will take steps to preserve their local culture and historical icons.


An Invitation to the Monster’s Ball
Spending Nyepi in Bali Brings the Bonus of Witnessing Ogoh-Ogah Festivities

While many Bali visitors make it a point to avoid Bali over the day of mandatory silence – Nyepi Day – which falls this year on Tuesday, March 12, 2013.

ot be in Bali on that date would also mean to deny yourself the unique festivities that take place on “Nyepi Eve” – a night of Mardi Gras-like partying with groups of young men from each village parading elaborately decorate floats bearing giant papier-mâché effigies - Ogoh-Ogoh through the streets of Bali. Borne on platforms constructed from trussed bamboo poles carried on the shoulders of the village men wearing traditional dress, the colorful figures vie for prizes and often engage in lively skirmishes at busy intersections.

Fueled on by generous quantities of arak, these Ogoh-Ogoh parades constitute a night-long party that only end on dawn, often with the burning of the effigies, before the revelers retire to their respective homes for 24-hours of mandatory meditation and reflection.

Ogoh-Ogoh statues are a treasured part of Bali’s cultural heritage, reflecting the Balinese reliance on Bhuta Khala – the antagonist in the eternal struggle between God and Demon; good and evil. Hindu Dharma teachings see Bhuta Kala as a necessary force of nature, the balancing influence that brings disease, catastrophe and misfortune to the community.

In fact, the propensity to do good and evil resides in every soul, represented by Bhuta Kala – traditionally a demon menacing mankind, paraded on “Nyepi Eve” to be communally exorcised and burnt on the eve of the New Year and, in so doing, celebrating the final victory of good over evil.

In recent times, the archetypical demon used to depict Bhuta Kala has been supplanted by more up-to-date nemesises portrayed as mythical animals, criminals, corrupt politicians and all other manner of unscrupulous individuals.

By confronting man’s darker side in the Ogoh-Ogoh parades, the devout are reminded of the practical choices each of us face in our daily lives to either do good or evil.

Guest wishing to enjoy Ogoh Ogoh festivities are best advised to make enquiries on activities in the vicinity of their accommodation location in Bali, avoiding the need for transportation on crowded and often hectic roadways common to “Nyepi Eve.”

Related Articles

[Silent Day and Silent Night]

[Nyepi at the Ayung Resort Ubud]


Here Comes the Sun
Indonesian Minister of Energy Jero Wacik Inaugurates Indonesia’s First Solar Power Plant in East Bali

A solar-energy generation project worth Rp. 26 billion (US$2.6 million) was inaugurated in Kubu, Karangasem, Bali on Monday, February 25, 2013

The Solar Energy Generation Project (PLTS)  able to produce substantial power for Bali’s power grid was officiated over by the Minister of Energy and Mineral Resources Jero Wacik, Bali’s governor Made Mangku Pastika, the director general of New Energy Sources and Power Conservation (EBTKE), the director general of electrification, the CEO of the State Power Board (PT PLN) and the regent of Karangasem.

The Karangasem Solar Energy project is the first of its kind in Bali. Rated at 1 Mega-watt, the center is expected to produce 2.88 million-kilowatts over a project lifetime of 20 years. The PLTS in Karangasem is also calculated to reduce the carbon footprint of producing such a quantity of power by 2.566 tons of CO2.

Quoted by Beritabali.com, Jero Wacik said at the inauguration ceremony: “This represents the first PLTS and, for the moment, the largest in Indonesia. Next year we will build another PLTS with even more electrical capacity.”

Wacik added that the solar energy generation center in Karangasem covers a land area of 1.7 hectares and is expected to become a model program for the use of solar energy as a source of electrical power in Indonesia in the future. Adding, “There is no limit to the amount of solar energy available for our use.”


A Wave from the Top
Bali’s Disaster Mitigation Agency Says North Bali Shoreline Most at Risk to Tsunami

Beritabali.com warns that Bali’s northern shore is at “great potential risk” to a catastrophe from tsunami. To help avoid unnecessary loss of life, the Bali Provincial Disaster Mitigation Team (BPBD) in cooperation with the regional government of Buleleng recently posted evacuation routes in the village of Pengastulan, Seririt in North Bali.

“The reason we have posted evacuation routes in the sub district of Seririt is because that, after carrying out a scientific survey, it was determined that the Seririt area was most at risk of tsunami. But, in fact, the entire northern shore of Bali is at risk of damage from a tsunami,” said the chief of Bali Disaster Mitigation Agency, Dewa Made Indra, speaking in Buleleng on February 25, 2013.

“If we look at it scientifically, the threat of a tsunami is greater on Bali’s northern shore than it is on the south. This is because of the tectonic plates located near Buleleng and to the west of Bali demonstrate that an earthquake of greater than 6 on the Richter scale will have a great potential for generating a tsunami. By comparison, the threat to Bali’s south is somewhat less,” explained Dewa Made Indra.


Say, ‘Cheese’
Complaints Raised Over Use of Illegal Foreign Photographers by Bali Hotels

Beritabali.com reports that there are many undocumented and illegal photographers working in Bali, some earning “tens of thousands of dollar per project” while working on only a tourist visa.

The chairman of the Indonesian Association of Photography Producers, Erry Wibowo, said in Kuta, Bali on February 24, 2013: ”These foreign photographers enter the country on a holiday visa, though in fact they are working in Bali doing photography jobs, like taking pictures of internationally branded hotels.”

Wibowo contends that foreign photographers are lured to work illegally in Bali by projects offering “tens of thousands of dollars” in payment. 

Wibowo elaborated: “The (foreign) photographers are paid as much as US$20,000 or nearly Rp. 200 million for a single photography job profiling an international hotel. This amount is far above that paid to an Indonesian photographer. These foreign photographers are working without any legal basis.”

In this context, Erry Wibowo hopes the government will more strictly enforce working permit regulations for professional photographers in Indonesia. He also expressed the wish that more opportunities to shoot internationally branded companies, such as international hotels in Bali, be given to local photographers.

“So far, the internationally branded hotels have used foreign photographers, leaving the impression that these hotels are outside the reach of local photographers, for them the main point is that the photographer must be a foreigner,” Wibowo complained.
 


Simian Siege Ends in Gunfire
Monkey Who Terrorized Villagers Shot in Klungkung, East Bali

An escalating number of attacks by a crazed monkey in the village of Banjarangkan in Klungkung has apparently come to an end with the shooting of a wild monkey by local hunting clubs.

The shooting follows by 3 days the latest attack by the crazed monkey on Nyoman Gede Astawa (40), who was set upon from behind on Monday, February 25, 2013.

As the result of that attack, the left calf of Astawa’s leg required 35 stitches to close his wounds.

When The Bali Post visited Nyoman Astawa at his house just hours after the attack, the man told of how he was bitten while cutting grass to feed his livestock. While carry bundles of grass back to his home, he felt pain in his left leg that caused him to collapse and fall into the nearby rice field. The monkey continued to rlentlessly attack the man who tried to ward off the primate with his scythe. Finally, threatened with the weapon, the monkey let go of the man's bleeding leg and ran to the nearby jungle.

Losing large amounts of blood, Astawa was taken to the Klungkung General Hospital where he was treated and released.

The region’s secretary, Ketut Janapri, held an emergency meeting with local law enforcement officials, military representatives and village officials to discuss how to deal with the monkey that has left many people frightened to leave their homes to tend fields and livestock.

It was agreed that efforts would be made on two fronts to end the crazed monkey’s attacks. While villagers would try to poison the monkey, others would attempt to hunt the animal down.

On Thursday, February 28, 2013, a large group of hunters and dogs gave chase to the monkey. Hunting dogs took up the animals trail at Tukad Mati River, finally cornering the primate and allowing a member of a local shooting club to dispatch the animal with a single shot to its head.

The animal’s corpse was brought back to the District Chief’s office (Camat) in Banjarangkan where terrified villagers gathered to see the dead monkey. There, local officials and religious leaders deliberated what, if any, special burial rites should be observed for the animal.

Press reports did not mention if there were any plans to test the dead monkey for rabies.

The successful hunters received cash bonuses collected from village associations and local residents.


Keeping Bali’s Press Neutral
Bali Media Association Reports Major Bali Newspaper to Press Council for Lacking Objectivity in its Coverage of the Governor’s Race

The rising political temperatures in Bali have prompted the Bali Media Association (AMB) to issue a call for all members of the local media in Bali to safeguard their neutrality in reporting on the race for governor and deputy governor.

Quoted by Kompas.com, Wisnu Wardana, the chairman of AMB said: “We must give the facts, we must report all aspects of the race. A press that is unbalanced is not a healthy press.”

Wisnu expressed his concern toward a particular member of Bali’s mass media perceived to be very unbalanced in their reporting and siding only with one candidate. The AMB has written an open letter to the Press Council, warning that if the situation is allowed to continue it will blemish the journalistic code and the reputation of the press.

Wisnu hopes the Press Council will follow up the letter sent by the AMB and make an objective review of the case.

To assist in safeguarding objectivity among Bali’s press, the AMB held a discussion in Bali  on Thursday, February 28, 2013 with the theme “The Role of an Objective Press in the Race for Bali’s Governor.”

Media figures, academic and government officials were invited to attend that forum.


Bali Update at 15
Balidiscovery.com's 'Bali Update' Celebrates 15 Years of Publishing News on Bali and its Tourism Industry

With Edition #861 of the Bali Update sent on Monday. March 4, 2013 – our award-winning weekly newsletter from Bali has turned 15.

t edition, sent on March 2, 1998, was a simple email sent to friends providing a Bali view on the island and helping to set the record straight on what we saw as the sometime unbalanced view on Indonesia coming from the international media.

Both the times and Bali Update have changed over the past decade-and-a half. Our mailing of subscribers numbers nearly 30,000. Bali Update articles rank consistently high in Google and other new disseminators, while our articles are regularly cited as an authoritative new source by media around the world. And, as Bali has entered a period of unprecedented tourism growth, Bali Update tries to keep track of both the Island's success and failures in managing modernity.

Much of the material in Bali Update is culled and re-edited from the international and Indonesian media. Each week we monitor hundreds of press releases, websites and print material to find articles we hope will be of interest to the readerships. We also perform statistical analysis via installments of "Bali by the Numbers" - trying to deciphers the deeper meaning of the Island's arrival statistics.

Chief among our news sources are the Indonesian print and electronic media that we interpret and translate for our English speaking readers. And, if, as some have claimed, Bali Update has grown bolder and more controversial over the years this is simply a reflection of the very lively and very open dialogue that characterizes the press in modern-day Indonesia.

Over the past 15 years Bali Update has received numerous awards and recognitions, but none more precious than those of you who have taken the time to drop a line and let us know we from a part of an adictive weekly “news fix” on Bali.

Thanks are also due to Juliawan and Gabriel in Balidiscovery.com’s IT department. Without their assistance and sacrificed weekends, our editor would not be able to get the more than 20 articles we publish each week on our website and distributed to our large mailing list.

Keep reading!



 
Bali News by Bali Update
Subscribe to the Bali Update
Receive the latest news from Bali by email!

Subscribe to our free weekly newsletter and receive every Monday the latest information from the Island of the Gods.

Simply enter your email address below and join the community of more than 22,000 readers of Bali's only weekly newsletter.

Our [Privacy Statement] explains how we handle the data you are providing.

 
Bali News by Bali Update
Explore the Archive of the Bali Update
Find related articles in our news archive!

The Bali Update is published since more than 5 years. Thousands of articles are waiting for your exploration.

Simply enter your search terms below and travel back in time with Bali's most popular newsletter:

Bali News by Bali Update
HTML-Archive
The links below provide access to the graphical version of the Bali Update.
Bali Update #946
October 20, 2014

Bali Update #945
October 13, 2014

Bali Update #944
October 06, 2014

Bali Update #943
September 29, 2014

Bali Update #942
September 22, 2014

Bali Update #941
September 15, 2014

Bali Update #940
September 08, 2014

Bali Update #939
September 01, 2014

Bali Update #938
August 25, 2014

Bali Update #937
August 18, 2014

Bali Update #936
August 11, 2014

Bali Update #935
August 04, 2014

Bali Update #934
July 27, 2014

Bali Update #933
July 21, 2014

Bali Update #932
July 14, 2014

Bali Update #931
July 07, 2014

Bali Update #930
June 30, 2014

Bali Update #929
June 23, 2014

Bali Update #928
June 16, 2014

Bali Update #927
June 09, 2014

Bali Update #926
June 02, 2014

Bali Update #925
May 26, 2014

Bali Update #924
May 19, 2014

Bali Update #923
May 12, 2014

Bali Update #922
May 5, 2014

Bali Update #921
April 28, 2014

Bali Update #920
April 21, 2014

Bali Update #919
April 14, 2014

Bali Update #918
April 07, 2014

Bali Update #917
March 30, 2014

Bali Update #916
March 24, 2014

Bali Update #915
March 17, 2014

Bali Update #914
March 10, 2014

Bali Update #913
March 03, 2014

Bali Update #912
February 24, 2014

Bali Update #911
February 17, 2014

Bali Update #910
February 10, 2014

Bali Update #909
February 03, 2014

Bali Update #908
January 27, 2014

Bali Update #907
January 20, 2014

Bali Update #906
January 13, 2014

Bali Update #905
January 06, 2014

Bali Update #904
December 30, 2013

Bali Update #903
December 23, 2013

Bali Update #902
December 15, 2013

Bali Update #901
December 09, 2013

Bali Update #900
December 02, 2013

Bali Update #899
November 25, 2013

Bali Update #898
November 18, 2013

Bali Update #897
November 11, 2013

Bali Update #896
November 04, 2013

Bali Update #895
October 28, 2013

Bali Update #894
October 21, 2013

Bali Update #893
October 14, 2013

Bali Update #892
October 07, 2013

Bali Update #891
September 30, 2013

Bali Update #890
September 23, 2013

Bali Update #889
September 16, 2013

Bali Update #888
September 09, 2013

Bali Update #887
September 02, 2013

Bali Update #886
August 26, 2013

Bali Update #885
August 19, 2013

Bali Update #884
August 12, 2013

Bali Update #883
August 05, 2013

Bali Update #882
July 29, 2013

Bali Update #881
July 22, 2013

Bali Update #880
July 15, 2013

Bali Update #879
July 08, 2013

Bali Update #878
July 01, 2013

Bali Update #877
June 24, 2013

Bali Update #876
June 16, 2013

Bali Update #875
June 10, 2013

Bali Update #874
June 03, 2013

Bali Update #873
May 27, 2013

Bali Update #872
May 20, 2013

Bali Update #871
May 13, 2013

Bali Update #870
May 06, 2013

Bali Update #869
April 29, 2013

Bali Update #868
April 22, 2013

Bali Update #867
April 15, 2013

Bali Update #866
April 08, 2013

Bali Update #865
April 01, 2013

Bali Update #864
March 25, 2013

Bali Update #863
March 18, 2013

Bali Update #862
March 11, 2013

Bali Update #861
March 04, 2013

Bali Update #860
February 25, 2013

Bali Update #859
February 18, 2013

Bali Update #858
February 11, 2013

Bali Update #857
February 04, 2013

Bali Update #856
January 28, 2013

Bali Update #855
January 21, 2013

Bali Update #854
January 14, 2013

Bali Update #853
January 07, 2013

Bali Update #852
December 31, 2012

Bali Update #851
December 24, 2012

Bali Update #850
December 17, 2012

Bali Update #849
December 10, 2012

Bali Update #848
December 03, 2012

Bali Update #847
November 26, 2012

Bali Update #846
November 19, 2012

Bali Update #845
November 12, 2012

Bali Update #844
November 05, 2012

Bali Update #843
October 29, 2012

Bali Update #842
October 22, 2012

Bali Update #841
October 15, 2012

Bali Update #839
October 08, 2012

Bali Update #839
October 01, 2012

Bali Update #838
September 24, 2012

Bali Update #837
September 15, 2012

Bali Update #836
September 10, 2012

Bali Update #835
September 03, 2012

Bali Update #834
August 27, 2012

Bali Update #833
August 20, 2012

Bali Update #831
August 13, 2012

Bali Update #831
August 06, 2012

Bali Update #830
July 30, 2012

Bali Update #829
July 23, 2012

Bali Update #828
July 16, 2012

Bali Update #827
July 09, 2012

Bali Update #826
July 02, 2012

Bali Update #825
June 25, 2012

Bali Update #824
June 18, 2012

Bali Update #823
June 11, 2012

Bali Update #822
June 04, 2012

Bali Update #821
May 28, 2012

Bali Update #820
May 21, 2012

Bali Update #819
May 14, 2012

Bali Update #818
May 07, 2012

Bali Update #817
april 30, 2012

Bali Update #816
april 23, 2012

Bali Update #815
april 16, 2012

Bali Update #814
april 09, 2012

Bali Update #813
april 02, 2012

Bali Update #812
march 26, 2012

Bali Update #811
march 19, 2012

Bali Update #810
march 12, 2012

Bali Update #809
march 05, 2012

Bali Update #808
february 27, 2012

Bali Update #807
february 20, 2012

Bali Update #806
february 13, 2012

Bali Update #805
february 06, 2012

Bali Update #804
january 30, 2012

Bali Update #803
january 23, 2012

Bali Update #802
january 16, 2012

Bali Update #801
january 9, 2012

Bali Update #800
january 2, 2012

Bali Update #799
December 26, 2011

Bali Update #798
December 19, 2011

Bali Update #797
December 12, 2011

Bali Update #796
December 05, 2011

Bali Update #795
November 21, 2011

Bali Update #794
November 21, 2011

Bali Update #793
November 14, 2011

Bali Update #792
November 04, 2011

Bali Update #791
October 31, 2011

Bali Update #790
October 24, 2011

Bali Update #789
October 17, 2011

Bali Update #788
October 14, 2011

Bali Update #787
October 10, 2011

Bali Update #786
October 03, 2011

Bali Update #785
September 26, 2011

Bali Update #784
September 19, 2011

Bali Update #783
September 12, 2011

Bali Update #782
September 05, 2011

Bali Update #781
August 29, 2011

Bali Update #780
August 22, 2011

Bali Update #779
August 15, 2011

Bali Update #778
August 8, 2011

Bali Update #777
August 1, 2011

Bali Update #776
July 25, 2011

Bali Update #775
July 18, 2011

Bali Update #774
July 11, 2011

Bali Update #773
July 4, 2011

Bali Update #772
June 27, 2011

Bali Update #771
June 20, 2011

Bali Update #770
June 13, 2011

Bali Update #769
June 06, 2011

Bali Update #768
May 30, 2011

Bali Update #767
May 23, 2011

Bali Update #766
May 16, 2011

Bali Update #765
May 9, 2011

Bali Update #764
May 2, 2011

Bali Update #763
April 25, 2011

Bali Update #762
April 18, 2011

Bali Update #761
April 11, 2011

Bali Update #760
April 4, 2011

Bali Update #759
March 28, 2011

Bali Update #758
March 21, 2011

Bali Update #757
March 14, 2011

Bali Update #756
March 7, 2011

Bali Update #755
February 28, 2011

Bali Update #754
February 21, 2011

Bali Update #753
February 14, 2011

Bali Update #752
February 7, 2011

Bali Update #751
January 31, 2011

Bali Update #750
January 24, 2011

Bali Update #749
January 17, 2011

Bali Update #748
January 10, 2011

Bali Update #747
January 3, 2011

Bali Update #746
December 27, 2010

Bali Update #745
December 20, 2010

Bali Update #744
December 13, 2010

Bali Update #743
December 06, 2010

Bali Update #742
November 29, 2010

Bali Update #741
November 22, 2010

Bali Update #740
November 15, 2010

Bali Update #739
November 8, 2010

Bali Update #738
November 1, 2010

Bali Update #737
October 25, 2010

Bali Update #736
October 18, 2010

Bali Update #735
October 11, 2010

Bali Update #734
October 4, 2010

Bali Update #733
September 27, 2010

Bali Update #732
September 20, 2010

Bali Update #731
September 13, 2010

Bali Update #730
September 6, 2010

Bali Update #729
August 30, 2010

Bali Update #728
August 23, 2010

Bali Update #727
August 16, 2010

Bali Update #726
August 9, 2010

Bali Update #725
August 2, 2010

Bali Update #724
July 26, 2010

Bali Update #723
July 19, 2010

Bali Update #722
July 12, 2010

Bali Update #721
July 5, 2010

Bali Update #720
June 28, 2010

Bali Update #719
June 21, 2010

Bali Update #718
June 14, 2010

Bali Update #717
June 07, 2010

Bali Update #716
May 31, 2010

Bali Update #715
May 24, 2010

Bali Update #714
May 17, 2010

Bali Update #713
May 10, 2010

Bali Update #712
May 3, 2010

Bali Update #711
April 26, 2010

Bali Update #710
April 19, 2010

Bali Update #709
April 12, 2010

Bali Update #708
April 05, 2010

Bali Update #707
March 29, 2010

Bali Update #706
March 22, 2010

Bali Update #705
March 15, 2010

Bali Update #704
March 08, 2010

Bali Update #703
March 01, 2010

Bali Update #702
February 22, 2010

Bali Update #701
February 15, 2010

Bali Update #700
February 8, 2010

Bali Update #699
February 1, 2010

Bali Update #698
January 25, 2010

Bali Update #697
January 18, 2010

Bali Update #696
January 11, 2010

Bali Update #695
January 4, 2010

Bali Update #694
December 28, 2009

Bali Update #693
December 21, 2009

Bali Update #692
December 14, 2009

Bali Update #691
December 7, 2009

Bali Update #690
November 30, 2009

Bali Update #689
November 23, 2009

Bali Update #688
November 16, 2009

Bali Update #687
November 09, 2009

Bali Update #686
November 2, 2009

Bali Update #685
October 26, 2009

Bali Update #684
October 19, 2009

Bali Update #683
October 12, 2009

Bali Update #682
October 05, 2009

Bali Update #681
September 28, 2009

Bali Update #680
September 21, 2009

Bali Update #679
September 14, 2009

Bali Update #678
September 07, 2009

Bali Update #677
August 31, 2009

Bali Update #676
August 24, 2009

Bali Update #675
August 17, 2009

Bali Update #674
August 10, 2009

Bali Update #673
August 03, 2009

Bali Update #672
July 27, 2009

Bali Update #671
July 20, 2009

Bali Update #670
July 13, 2009

Bali Update #669
July 06, 2009

Bali Update #668
June 29, 2009

Bali Update #667
June 22, 2009

Bali Update #666
June 15, 2009

Bali Update #665
June 08, 2009

Bali Update #664
June 01, 2009

Bali Update #663
May 25, 2009

Bali Update #662
May 18, 2009

Bali Update #661
May 11, 2009

Bali Update #660
May 04, 2009

Bali Update #659
April 27, 2009

Bali Update #658
April 18, 2009

Bali Update #657
April 11, 2009

Bali Update #656
April 04, 2009

Bali Update #655
March 28, 2009

Bali Update #654
March 21, 2009

Bali Update #653
March 14, 2009

Bali Update #652
March 07, 2009

Bali Update #651
February 28, 2009

Bali Update #650
February 21, 2009

Bali Update #649
February 14, 2009

Bali Update #648
February 7, 2009

Bali Update #647
January 31, 2009

Bali Update #646
January 26, 2009

Bali Update #645
January 19, 2009

Bali Update #644
January 10, 2009

Bali Update #643
January 05, 2009

Bali Update #642
December 29, 2008

Bali Update #641
December 22, 2008

Bali Update #640
December 15, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #638
December 01, 2008

Bali Update #637
November 24, 2008

Bali Update #636
November 17, 2008

Bali Update #635
November 10, 2008

Bali Update #634
November 03, 2008

Bali Update #633
October 27, 2008

Bali Update #632
October 20, 2008

Bali Update #631
October 13, 2008

Bali Update #630
October 06, 2008

Bali Update #629
Septembe 29, 2008

Bali Update #628
September 22, 2008

Bali Update #627
September 15, 2008

Bali Update #626
September 08, 2008

Bali Update #625
September 01, 2008

Bali Update #624
August 25, 2008

Bali Update #623
August 18, 2008

Bali Update #622
August 11, 2008

Bali Update #621
August 04, 2008

Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
July 21, 2008

Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
July 07, 2008

Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
June 23, 2008

Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
June 02, 2008

Bali Update #611
May 26, 2008

Bali Update #610
May 19, 2008

Bali Update #609
May 12, 2008

Bali Update #608
May 05, 2008

Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
April 07, 2008

Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #601
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #600
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
January 07, 2008

Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
December 17, 2007

Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
November 05, 2007

Bali Update #581
October 29, 2007

Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
October 15, 2007

Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
September 10, 2007

Bali Update #573
September 03, 2007

Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
August 20, 2007

Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006
 

Home · Bali Hotels · Bali Villas · Bali Excursions · Bali Sports · Bali News · Site Map · RSS