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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #934 - 27 July 2014

IN THIS UPDATE
 » Horas!


Forbidden Fruit
Running Short on Holiday Fruit, Bali Seeks Loosening of Restrictions on Imported Fruit

The provincial government of Bali is lobbying the Indonesian central government to loosen restrictions on the importation of fruit in anticipation of soaring prices over the Galungan-Kuningan holiday cycle when gifts of fruit and religious offerings incorporating their use are at a peak.

According to Bisnis Bali, tens of containers of imported fruit are being held by customs officials at ports across Indonesia. Meanwhile, suppliers of fruit are frustrated, unable to meet the higher demand for these items at malls, supermarkets and local markets.

Almost all fruit importers in Bali’s capital of Denpasar complain that have insufficient stocks to fill orders over the Kuningan holiday. Suardana, the owner of Apple Mart - a fruit mini-mart in Bali said on March 31, 2013, “The government must be proactive in lobbying the central government to open the tap so imported fruit in anticipation of the high demand over the holidays.”

Because of limited supplies, the cost of fruit produce has doubled in local markets. The cost of imported apple in local markets is reported to be more than Rp. 70,000 per kilogram (US$7) while manalagi apples from Malang in East Java now cost around Rp. 23,000 per kilogram (US$2.30). Other fruit products are experiencing similar price hikes.

There are also complaints that much of the local fruit being sold in Bali markets is of sub-standard quality.

Some 500 containers of imported fruit is reportedly being held at Tanjung Perak, the seaport of Surabaya.


Suardana added: “If the government of Bali is prepared to lobby, the supplies of fruit during the coming holidays can be sufficient and prices will not spiral out of control. Pity the customers who are being forced to buy local fruit of poor quality at very high prices.”

Together with calls for a loosening of restrictions on the importation of fruit into Bali are simultaneous calls for the government to help farmers produce higher quality fruit for sale on the local marketplace.

In closing, Suardana said: “The presentation of local fruit is not yet as good as imported fruit. Fruit of superior quality and rotting fruit are mixed together in a single  basket.”


Madé, Row the Boat Ashore
Villagers at Lake Beratan Limit Powerboat Usage to Reduce Lake Pollution

Pollution of Lake Beratan in the regency of Tabanan, Bali is becoming a subject of increasing concern. Testing carried out by the Tabanan Environmental Agency (KLH) have confirmed that the waters of the Lake are polluted.

According to the Bali Post, one of the suspected sources of pollution on the lake is leakage of fuels from speedboats.  And, while the levels of pollution remain relatively low, environmentalists say the level of pollution warrants concern and monitoring.

The chief of KLH Tabanan, A.A. Ngurah Raka Icwara, explained that his agency routinely inspects the condition of Lakre Beratan’s water with tests carried out at least one every three months. Tests carried out in April 2012 showed that generally the quality of the water on Lake Beratan was not overly polluted.

Those water tests showed water quality was still categorized as “class 1” with the exception of measurements for dissolved oxygen (DO). That pollution found on the lake was traced by environmentalists to the fuel leaking from speedboats operating on the lake.

Icwara said: “The concern is that pollution is coming from speedboats.” Follow up tests are now being scheduled to determine if pollution is worsening. Meanwhile, traditional villagers living on the edge of the lake are refusing efforts to add more powerboats to the lake.

Villagers insist that the high use of powerboats is having negative effects on the local ecosystem of the lake that is considered sacred by many Balinese. Villagers are therefore suggesting that only paddleboats be allowed to operate on the lake.

The chief of the traditional village of Candikuning, Made Susila Putra, told of how a villa operating on the lake has been refused permission to operate a powerboat on the lake, limiting powerboats to the 20 or so currently operating on the lake.


Bali Free of Rabies by 2015
Bali Administration Confident Bali Now Nearly Rabies Free

The Bali provincial administration is confident that Bali will achieve “rabies free” status by 2015. 

“It could be possible that Bali will be free of rabies because the last rabies case found in a human was last April,” said Head of Bali’s Health Agency, I Ketut Suarjaya, on Tuesday.

To qualify for “rabies free” status Bali is required to have two consecutive years without any cases of rabies in an animal or human, the Jakarta Post reports.

Rabies cases in Bali have been steadily decreasing since numbers the number of reported cases peaked in 2010 at 82 cases. This high numbers of cases led to a mass vaccination program for dogs across the island, precipitating and a drastic decrease in the number of reported cases. In 2011, 24 cases of rabies infections among humans were reported, and in 2012 that figure declined to only 8.

The distribution of the rabies vaccination has now become more selective, says Sanglah Hospital’s secretary of the rabies mitigation team, Dr. Ken Wiransadhi. Free rabies vaccinations are provided by state-owned hospitals for individuals presenting with dog bite injuries to vital organs, the head, face, fingers or genitalia. The vaccination is also prioritized for individuals suffering multiple and deep wounds inflicted by stray dogs.

The vaccine is also available for purchase.

The Bali Health Agency currently has 5,000 vials of vaccine, 750 of which have been distributed to the regencies. This level is sufficient to guard approximately 1,250 people against rabies over the coming months.

Currently only 2 percent of dog bites are now testing positive for rabies.

Meanwhile, work to ensure Bali reaches “rabies free” status continues. Head of Bali’s Animal Husbandry Agency, Putu Sumantra, announced that all of the 300,000 dogs in Bali would be vaccinated in stage four of the administration’s inoculation program, set to run from mid-April until June of this year.

It is estimated that throughout stage three, approximately 250,000 dogs, or 80 per cent of Bali’s dog population were vaccinated. 500 of these were also de-sexed to curb the population of feral dogs.

The spokesman for the National Commission on Zoonosis, Arie Rukmantara, concurs that the 2015 target is achievable, considering the drop in the number of rabies cases since 2008 when the first case of rabies in Bali was found in Jimbaran.

Rukmantara has said that the main challenge in Bali was maintaining resident’s commitment and participation in the public vaccination program. Adding, “If an outbreak occurs for several years, it is crucial to maintain the commitment of local people to participate in the eradication efforts.”

Chairman of the Bali chapter of the Indonesian Association of Veterinarians, I Gusti Ngurah Mahardika, suggests that since the peak rabies period in 2008-09, Balinese communities have not adapted the way they care for their dogs. “There’s only been a small change in attitude in the way they care for their dogs. 

The dogs are still let loose to look for food on the streets,” Mahardika said. “Dogs do bite. Thus, preventing them from contracting rabies is most important.”

It is imperative that communities vaccinate their dogs regularly, to assist Bali achieve “rabies free” status. Mahardika said that the best method for preventing rabies is the regular vaccination of dogs as well as raising public awareness of the urgent need for human vaccinations if and individual has been bitten by a dog.

Residents are expected to bring their dogs to have the free vaccination as part of the Bali-wide program.

Contributed by Nahhan Prudy.

Related Articles

[Bali Winning the War on Rabies

[Bali’s War on Rabies Continues]

[Bali: Rabies Free by 2015?]


The Pickle of Fixing Hotel Tariffs
Badung Tourism Officers Described Plans to Fix Hotel Tariffs as ‘Impossible’

Following critiques and appraisals offered up form a number of tourism observers and members of the Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association (PHRI), the head of the Badung Tourism Service, Raka Darmawan, has chipped in his opinion on the possibility of establishing regulations to standardize hotel tariffs.

As reported by Bisnis Bali, Darmawan commented on fixed hotel tariffs, saying on April 4, 2013, “This appears to be something that is impossible.”

The top tourism officer for the regency explained that any effort to standardize hotel rates brings with it the possibility of monopolies and cartels.

Because of this, The National Commission for the Supervision of Competitiveness (KPPU) recently issued a warning against announced plans by the province of Bali to standardized hotel rates. Saying his office was therefore unable to introduce fixed prices for hotels, Darmawan said that his office must surrender matter of pricing to market forces.

Darmawan emphasized that issues of hotel tariff are irrevocably tied to matters of facility and service. He pointed out how some three-star hotels manage to present facilities that exceed those offered by five-star hotels. Adding, “If the hotel accepts this situation, then clearly there is no problem.” He also said the need to consider standardization of pricing is not pressing.

He continued, saying the biggest culprit in the current price war are city hotels or budget hotels - built on narrow strips of land with high room counts.

The resulting City Hotels and Budget Hotels can sell their rooms at very low room rates. For this reason, he said his office was working to limit the number of budget hotels. Badung is now reviewing rules on the minimum size of land needed for hotel development and room ratios as a mean to curb new budget hotel projects.

Related Article

[Self-Serving or Serving the Public?]


Bali’s Grand Old Dame
History of Bali Beach Hotel – a Half-Century of Ups and Downs and Mystical Guests

The Inna Grand Bali Beach, once known as the Hotel Bali Beach, was built in 1962 and formally inaugurated in November 1966.

Now nearly 50 years of operations, the hotel has a rich and checkered past, commencing operations as the very first international-standard hotel in Bali standing 9-storeys high. So intense was criticism of the hotel’s towering height when it was originally opened,  that regulations were enacted in 1971 limiting the height of new hotels in Bali to just 15-meters - a number tied to the height of a tall coconut palm tree.

The Hotel Bali Beach was built with funds paid by the Japanese government as war reparations to Indonesia.

On January 20, 1993, the hotel was engulfed in a massive fire with flames shooting far into the sky that largely destroyed the entire hotel. The source of the fire was eventually linked to new carpeting being laid in a lobby shop, in which flammable adhesives being used by workman acted as a propellant.

Forming part of the rich folklore surrounding the landmark Bali Beach Hotel is the fact that a 1993 fire that virtually destroyed the entire hotel somehow left completely unscathed room #327, while rooms above and below and to the left and right of that room we obliterated by the flames. 

The hotel was eventually rebuilt and reopened for business following the devastating fire of 1993.

During the construction of the original hotel, then President Sukarno designated that room room #327 was to be set aside for his exclusive use. However, the failed coup of September 30, 1965, eventually saw Sukarno toppled from power before the property could be completed and Bung Karno could personally occupy room #327.

After the hotel’s opening, the Bali’s Beach’s management routinely sold room #327 to the traveling public, resulting in frequent reports of restless nights, ghostly hauntings and paranormal occurrences.

Mystified by the mystery of room #327, Indonesia’s leading mystics were summoned to analyze the situation. Eventually it was concluded that President Sukarno’s proclaimed desire to build a room for Nyai Loro Kidul – the mystical Queen of Indonesia’s southern shore, had been fulfilled with her spirit now a permanent presence in the room.

In order to avoid any further unpleasantness, room #327 remains closed to the public and only those obtaining special permission to mediate in the room are allowed entrance for brief periods and then only in the company of special guides and guards provided by the hotel.

At the entrance to the room is a written warning sign forbidding entrance into the room without representatives of the Hotel. Those granted entrance must follow certain set protocols, including removing their shoes and refraining from profanity during any visit. Additionally, those wishing to meditate can spend no more than 60 minutes within the room’s confines.

Another room at the Hotel never rented to the public is room #2401. This is a private bungalow located on the hotel’s grounds. This accommodation is Imbued with a magical nuance -emanating from a room filled with ornaments all wrapped in green cloth. Moreover, table covers, curtains, bedspreads, pillowcases, a beauty mirror, glasses and plates - are all also green.

The color green is the considered as the chosen divine color favored by the Queen of the Southern Seas – Nyai Loro Kidul .

The bungalow (Room #2401) was built in 1972 and designated for the exclusive use of The Queen of the Southern Seas.  Meanwhile, room #327 is believed to be shared by both Indonesia’s first President and the Queen

Nyai Loro Kidul (also spelled Nyai Roro Kidul) is a legendary Indonesian spirit, known as the Queen of the Southern Sea of Java.


Dumbing Down
Bali Moving Towards Lower Education Requirements for Licensed Tour Guides

The Indonesian Tour Guides Association (HPI) is proposing that the current law requiring that licensed tour guide have tertiary certificates be changed to open that field of work to high school graduates.

As reported by The Jakarta Post, Amos Lilo, a spokesman for HPI-Bali, defended the move, saying many guides have only high school certificates but posses the knowledge and experience to work as professional guides.

Said Lilo: 

“We have proposed the provincial administration revise the articles on education to allow high school graduates to become a guide after completing a course and probationary period.”

The move is intended to expand working opportunities and help reduce the number of unlicensed guides in Bali. In 2012, 352 arrests were made of unregistered guides in Bali, with a greater number of arrests expected in 2013.

The Bali Tourist Authority, headed by Ida Bagus Kade Subhisku, and the governor of Bali, Made Mangku Pastika, have endorsed the change in policy now being discussed by legislators in Bali.



The HPI-Bali says the number of active guide licenses held in Bali numbered around 5,000 with another 3,000 guide licenses have gone inactive and not been renewed.

Related Article

[Guileless Guiding]


Cheap at Half the Price
Mandala Air Luanches ‘Pay to Go, Return Free’ Promotion between Bali – Jakarta and Jakarta - SIngapore

To celebrate the opening of new routes Mandala Airlines has launched a “Pay to Go, Return Free” for certain tickets purchased between April 3-10, 2013.

The special offer is for flights taken between April 8, 2013 and June 30, 2013 and available on the airline’s new services between Jakarta – Singapore and Denpasar – Jakarta.

The airline is operating daily flights on each of these routes.

The new routes also mark the first anniversary of the low-cost airline’s return to service after an extended grounding due to financial difficulties.

Specially priced tickets on the Jakarta-Singapore route start form Rp. 300,000 (US$30) and Rp. 394,000 (US$39) on the Jakarta-Denpasar. There’s limited availability and the price does not include taxes, booking fees, extra baggage and ancillary charges.


Good for What Ails You
Australia’s Foreign Affairs Minister Visits BIMC Hospital at Nusa Dua, Bali

Australian Senator and Minister of Foreign Affairs Bob Carr recently visited Jakarta and Bali and included a visit to Ground Zero in Bali and a tour of the BIMC Hospital in Nusa Dua during the Bali portion of the trip.

BIMC Hospitals, with locations in Kuta and Nusa Dua, are Australian-owned and managed medical facilities.

Accompanying Bob Carr were Western Australian Senator Glenn Sterle - Chair of the Senate Legislation Rural, Regional Affairs and Transport Committee and the Australian Ambassador to Indonesia Greg Moriarty.

Bob Carr’s visit to Bali was in connection with his chairmanship of a regional conference of foreign ministers held in Nusa Dua, Bali.

The BIMC Hospitals is at the forefront of Bali’s campaign to become a medical tourism destination by treating many Australians on an outpatient, emergency and elective procedures.

Bob Carr expressed his pleasant surprise when he was told during his visit that more than 40,000 Australians have been served by BIMC Hospital during its 15 years history. The Australian Foreign Minister also gratefully acknowledged BIMC Hospital’s role in treating more than one hundred victims of the Bali bombing more than 10 years ago.

BIMC Hospital Nusa Dua
is lauded as one of the most advanced medical facilities in Indonesia equipped for complex surgeries with three surgical theatres and prides itself with a standard equal to that of modern Australian hospitals. Senator Glenn Sterle confirmed that he was very impressed by the quality of the facility and services. ”I would have no hesitations to allow my kids to go to Bali knowing that such professional medical care is available.”

“We have several milestones to look forward to in the coming months not least the first anniversary of our Nusa Dua hospital in May,” said BIMC Founder and CEO, Craig Beveridge. “Having received the Foreign Minister, the WA Senator and the Australian Ambassador on April 1st is a top honor for us and our Indonesian counterparts.”

[BIMC Hospital Website]

 


Guiding by Guile
Bali Vows to Take Legal Steps Against Foreign Tour Guides Working Illegally on the Island

Seputarbali.com, is warning that foreign tour guides are not allowed to work on the Island, quoting the head of the Bali Provincial Tourism Office, Ida Bagus Kade Subhisku.

“We will take firm action if we find foreign tourists working as guides and report those involved to immigration,” threatened Subhisku.

He underlined those Indonesian citizens holding a license as a certified guide are the only individuals authorized to fill the role of guides.

A foreign tour leader can accompany groups of foreign tourists in Bali, but that individual cannot act as a tour guide and impart information and local knowledge on island attractions and culture.

At the same time, the chairman of the Bali Guide Association (HPI), Sang Putu Subaya, said his association saluted and appreciated efforts by local enforcement agencies to control the activities of illegal tour guides in Bali.

Presently, 15 illegal tour guides captured by authorities are being processed through the Denpasar District Court.
 


Beware of Dutchman Bearing Cameras
Busy Dutch Undercover Journalist Files Damning Coverage of Bali Traffic Police, Money Changers and Customs Officials

Kees Van Der Spek, a Dutch investigative journalist, is at the center of growing controversy over three separate and very explosive videos now going viral– each depicting Bali's tourism industry in a most unfavorable light.
The first video that surfaced was apparently recorded several months ago at a busy traffic intersection in Kerobokan, Bali. Using concealed microphones and multiple hidden cameras, the Dutch journalist managed to capture a very amiable but no less corrupt traffic cop extorting Rp. 200,000 (US$20) for the journalists for his failure to wear the required helmet or bring a valid driving license.

The two Balinese policemen, later identified as 2nd Police Inspector Komang Sari and his assistant Brigadier Putu Indra Jaya, have been formally relieved from duty pending their processing through a complex legal and administrative review.

In the film, the unfailingly polite policeman Indra Jaya takes a bribe while engaging in a jocular conversation with the Dutchman, even treating the tourist to a cold beer caught on film and an invitation to drive for the rest of the day without a helmet or a license on “his street.”


r the Bali Police, Hariadi, confirmed to the State News Agency that the police caught on film are undoing investigation. Meanwhile, the head of the Badung Police Precinct where the two officers are assigned told the press that the film was made some five months ago

Police have confirmed that the policemen have been taken into custody in keeping with instructions issued by the Bali Chief of Police General Arif Wachyunadi.

Cut to a Quiet Side Street in Kuta . . .

As the corrupt policeman video was going viral, Van Der Spek launched a second video via YouTube this time documenting the thieving shenanigans and sleight-of-hand practiced at several corrupt moneychangers. Confronting moneychanger staff captured on film siphoning off a few bills, one of the shots shows a moneychanger demonstrating for the Dutchman how he steals currency notes - all filmed while he man stood in front of the official logo of the Association of the Foreign Exchange Dealers (APVA).

Cut to Bali’s Airport . . .

A third video, also recorded by Van Der Spek on a concealed camera at Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport, showed a uniformed officer receiving a fistful of currency via a handshake from Van Der Spek in order to speed the inspection process.

Upon hearing of the video made at Bali’s airport, the head of the Ngurah Rai Customs Office, Made Wijaya, told Beritabali.com that he immediately formed an investigative team to determine if his staff were involved in receiving corrupt payments, pledging to punish any customs officers proven to be involved in illegal acts.

Bali Tourism Responds

Ignoring that at least one of the moneychangers caught on film was a APVA member, the head of the Bali Chapter of the Indonesian Association of Tourism (GIPI-Bali), Ngurah Wijaya has told the press: ”We have repeatedly revealed to the government the actions of dishonest moneychangers, asking authorities to undertake sweeping actions against unlicensed money changers. It is those money changers that are unlicensed who have the potential to commit fraud.”

Wijaya did add that if the latest fraud took place at a licensed money changer the operation should be closed.


Power Plays
Chinese-Indonesian Joint Venture PT GEB Power Plant in North Bali Plagued by Numerous Problems and Irregularities.

The Jakarta Post reports the North Bali legislators in Buleleng have uncovered a number of irregularities in the building and operation of the Celukan Bawang coal-fired electrical generation plant (PLTU).

Lawmakers visiting the plant encountered a large amount of heavy equipment originating from China but failing to display the required safety certificates. Mangku Budiasa, the chairman of Commission B of the Buleleng House of Representatives (DPRD-Buleleng) cited the lack of safety certification and the illegal use of subsidized fuel in running the plant.

Representing the management of the PLTU, Igon Wisnu, apologized, saying that he was unable to provide all the required documentation during the short visit by legislators. “We will try to process and to provide any required documents,” Wisnu promised.

The power plant has been the focus of many complaints including the failure to properly document its foreign workers, irregularities in land acquisitions, minimal employment of people from surrounding communities and manipulation of the project’s approved environmental impact plan.

The PLTU is being built and jointly operated by PT General Energy Bali (GEB) and China Huadian Engineering Corporation.


Reportedly more than half of the land being used by the PLTU is occupied illegally, with developers having failed to make final payment for land acquisition.
 


C-Note a Month to Train the Nation
Bali Government Preparing to Locally Collect Manpower Training Fee

The provincial government of Bali is targeting an income of Rp. 20 billion (US$2 million) in 2013 from official retribution fees collected for registered foreign workers in Bali.

Quoted by the State News Agency Antara, the chief of the Bali Manpower and Transmigration Office, I Gusti Ngurah Agung Sudarsana, said, “The only remaining problem is the implementation of the retribution to be paid for extending foreign work permits (IMTA) in our region.”

That assumption on total money to be generated, however, is based on collecting retributions from January – December 2013, while, the implementation of the retribution is still under review by the Bali Provincial House of Representatives (DPRD-Bali) in April.

“Even though Bali has yet to complete its provincial regulation (on retribution), within the national context it's the second fastest province nationwide in formulating regulations for the extension of the IMTA,” said Sudarsana.

In the past the IMTA was charged on a national level from Jakarta, a power that is now in the process of devolving to the provinces.

Regulations on the national level stop IMTA retributions on December 2012, but provinces can only begin to collect these fees of US$100 a month when the empowering regulations have been put in place on a provincial level.


Toasting Victory with Cape Discovery Wines
Cape Discovery Wines Wins Gold and Silver at 2013 China Wine & Spirit Awards

After winning a bronze medal last year in the International Wine and Spirit Competition in London, Cape Discovery has acquired to more medals at the 2013 China Wine & Spirits Awards (CWSA) recently held in Hong Kong.
 
Honores of Gold were bestowed for Cape Discovery Chardonnay and Silver for Cape Discovery Sauvignon Blanc. The CWSA is the only award program in the world based entirely on consumer preferences and demand.
 
The judges at the CWSA 2013 were drawn from China’s most influential wine and spirits buyers, distributors, food and beverage directors and sommeliers who tasted their way through 3,300 wines and spirits from 25 countries in one of Hong Kong’s largest and most anticipated competitions of the year.
 
Also winning medals at this year’s CWSA were prominent wine brands such as Otuwhero, Wolf Blass, Jacobs Creek, Taylors, Lindeman, Wyndham Estate, and Evans & Tate.  That Cape Discovery as a relative newcomer to the Bali winemaking scene can succesfully compete with such established wine brands is am affirmation at once to the quality of their wine and the passion with which it is made.
 
Only on the market for one year, Cape Discovery  won a Bronze Medal in 2012 in the dry white wine class at the International Wine and Spirits Competition (IWSC) in London. That competition also saw Cape Discovery in good company with well known producers such as Penfolds, Jacobs Creek and Oyster Bay.
 
Using an innovative natural technique, the grapes used by Cape Discovery are carefully transported to Indonesia where traditional wine making is undertaken. Cape Discovery has already won many fans in Indonesia due to their consistent quality and affordable prices.
 
Working from the philosophy that you cannot make good wine from bad grapes; Cape Discovery sources premium grapes from a boutique vineyard in Margaret River, Western Australia. Using a natural process which doesn’t require any preservatives or additives,  extraordinary efforts are made to keep the grapes’ juice fresh and pure on its way so to their Singaraja winery where the fruit undergo pressing.
 
[Cape Discovery Wines Website]



Burnt Offerings
Japanese Tourist Could Get 12-Years Prison for Being Caught with 0.72 Grams of Marijuana.

A 35-year-old male tourist from Japan is being processed through the Denpasar Courts after being caught with less than one gram of marijuana in his possession.

If the maximum sentence is imposed by the Denpasar Court, shop owner Watanabe Shinishi could face 12 years in prison for being arrested with 0.72 grams of marijuana at a Kuta nightspot on December 23, 2012.

The Japanese tourist, visiting Bali with his family, told police he brought the drugs from a man on the beach for Rp. 200,000 (US$20) and intended to use it for his own enjoyment.

The man’s trial resumes in Denpasar on April 16, 2013.


Sluggish Start for Bali Tourism in 2013
Bali by the Numbers: Bali Arrival Figures for February Suggest Island in a Holding Pattern

Major Markets

Australia – Bali’s month-after-month streak of steadily increasing arrival numbers ex Australia appear to be at an end as Australians are taking their strong dollar to destinations further afield. Arrivals in February were down month-on-month by 6.84% at 53,455. Year-on-year through the end of February Ozzie arrivals have declined 4.84%.

People’s Republic of China – The PRC staged a comeback of sorts in February by increasing month-on-month by 63% after declining in January.

These numbers are clearly the effect of Chinese New Year, which fell in February in 2013, a month later than 2012 when the greatest Chinese holiday of the year occurred in January.

For the first two months of the year PRC arrivals are down 10.80%, which may indicate a cooling from that market.

Malaysia – Malaysian arrivals declined 10% in February but are up 7.8% on a cumulative basis for the first two months of 2013.

Japan – The Japanese market to Bali appears to be on a slow mend. While Japanese arrivals in February were down 16.19% against February 2012, Japanese visitors remain 5.8% ahead of 2012 when seen on a cumulative basis for January-February 2013.

Malaysia – Malaysian arrivals for the first two months of 2013 are 7.8% ahead of the same months in 2012.

However, Malaysian arrivals declined 10% month-on-month in February.

South Korea – South Korean arrivals continue to fail. Month-on-month arrivals are down 23.28% with 9,467 visitors in February. On a cumulative basis for January-February, arrivals from South Korea are down 4.62%.

Will threats and sword shaking by North Korea have an effect on foreign travel and consumer confidence in South Korean and the region. Stay tuned.

Russia – Russian arrivals have softened and are down 3.34% on a cumulative basis for January-February 2013.

Taiwan – Bali enjoyed a Chinese New Year bonus of sorts with Taiwanese arrivals for the month of February up 21.8%. However, on a cumulative basis for the first two months of 2013, Taiwanese arrivals are down 8.49%.

USA – The U.S. inbound market to Bali is proving surprisingly robust. February arrivals month-on-month are up 21.3% at 7,986 visitors.

Year-on-year 12.17% more U.S. citizens came to Bali in the first two months of 2013.

United Kingdom – U.K. arrivals to Bali declined 33.7% in February when compared to the same month one year before. On a cumulative basis, U.K. arrivals are down 19% for the first two months of the year. Will plans for Garuda Indonesia to recommence service to London help to revive the U.K. market?

France – French traffic to Bali continues to grow. 2.8% more Frenchmen visited Bali in February 2013 at 6.265 visitors than did in the same month one year before. Year-on-year French visitors to Bali for the first two months of the year are up 5.73%.

Germany – The German market to Bali remains exceptionally robust. The 6,650 Germans who came to Bali in February represented a 35.88% improvement over February 2012.Year-on-year, German arrivals are similarly strong, improving 27.3% during the first two months of 2013.

The Netherlands – There’s little relief in sight for The Netherlands where February arrivals of 4,610 were down 6,9% as compared to February 2012. On a cumulative basis, Dutch arrivals are down 8.43 for the first two months of the year.

India – India is proving to be a fast-emerging new market for Bali. 4,180 Indian visitors in February constituted a 6.33% improvement over the same month one year before. Year-on-year for the fist two months of 2013 Indian arrivals are up 34.44%


A Pier Over Troubled Waters
Tanah Ampo International Cruise Terminal: Nature Extracts a Heavy Toll on Those Who Build Inferior Wharves and Piers

The Bali Daily (The Jakarta Post) reports that huge waves have inflicted substantial damage on the dock and wharf facilities at The Tanah Ampo International Cruise Terminal in Karangasem, East Bali.

The latest damage to the hapless port was confirmed by Iwan Sabatini, general manager of the State-owned port management company PT Pelindo III Benoa, who said high waves had ravaged the port during the months of January – March 2013. “The latest incident occurred on March 29 in which strong winds and five-meter high waves destroyed the already stricken wharfs,” said Sabatini.

PT Pelindo III has allocated US$22,400 to try to bring the ill conceived and poorly built port into economic operation. The latest damage had now more-or-less made the facility unusable by visiting cruise ships to Bali.

The port, intended to serve visiting cruise ships, has cost the central government US$12.17 million was apparently built without reference to local sea conditions and the requirement of visiting vessels. A trial-and-error approach to port construction has resulted in a terminal with virtually no fans within the international cruise industry that has seen pontoons meant to land passengers ravaged by waves and a surrounding port infrastructure largely inadequate to the needs of ships and their passengers.

The continuing plague of problems affecting the Tanah Ampo Port has precipitated a migration of Bali’s cruise ship visits to the southernmost port of Benoa where steadily improving service and port facilities, making Tanah Ampo a relatively unattractive option to visiting cruise ships. 

Latest reports suggest the government is now considering constructing a breakwater for Tanah Ampo, a step many insist should have been done before anyl work on the cruise pier and cruise terminal commenced in 2010.

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[No Parking on the Paddocks]

[Port Out, Starboard Home]

[Editorial: Beware of Rank Amateurs]

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[Who’s in Charge?]

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Someone, Please Change the Channel
Bali Governor Pastika Angered by Dutch Videos on YouTube Documenting Corruption and Crime in Bali

As reported by Metro TV, Bali governor Made Mangku Pastika was both concerned and angered when he watched YouTube upload made by Dutch journalist Kees Van Der Spek showing corruption by traffic police and customs officials in Bali. [See: Beware of Dutchman Bearing Cameras]

After reviewing the video reports, Pastika said on Sunday, April 7, 2013: “I am very concerned, because this can damage Bali’s image. There is no need for tourist visitors coming to Bali to be tricked or extorted.”

Calling for an end to such practices, the governor immediately called and wrote to three separate institutions: The Bali Police, The Minister of Justice and Human Rights and Bank Indonesia.

In contacting the Bali chief of police, the governor insisted that all field officers be gathered together and warned not to participate in extorting foreign tourists. “If the police must ticket someone, then ticket them. Don’t settle matters on the spot,” said Pastika who once served as Bali’s chief policeman.

He also agreed if the police decide to prosecute the Dutch journalist Van Der Spek, adding, “That would be good if those paying bribes are prosecuted because of their involvement in the interaction.”

In addressing the Minister of Justice and Human Right, governor Pastika also asked that any official of the Bali Airport Customs Office proven to be accepting bribes be prosecuted. “Extortion against the same person (Van Der Spek) was done by officers of the Ngurah Rai Customs office. I have therefore undertaken to coordinate with the relevant agencies to warn their staff not to allow similar situations to occur again.’

Finally, Pastika said he had contacted Bank Indonesia to tighten control on moneychangers in Bali. He said crime and trickery was rife among moneychangers. Pastika said: “Rather than being caught on camera and displayed on the social network, it would be better to take anticipative steps to avoid such occurrences. For this reason I have asked Bank Indonesia to take steps against moneychangers who commit crimes.”


A Noble Man in an Ignoble Job
Bali Trash Scavenger Returns $30,000 in Jewelry Thrown Out with the Trash

Amidst the negative image of Bali and suggestion of widespread dishonesty, a young scavenger who makes his living from sorting through other people garbage at the local rubbish tip has made the news and given renewed hope in the basic decency that remains the predominant characteristic of the people who make the Island of Bali their home.

As reported by The Jakarta Post, the young scavenger named Ahmad discovered three boxes of gold in the back of a garbage truck in Denpasar, Bali on Tuesday, April 2, 2013.

Bedazzled by his find easily worth years of his meager income, he immediately contacted his Balinese boss, Made Raka, to seek assistance in making sure the gold found its way back to its rightful owner.

Ahmad, a migrant worker who comes from Sitobundo, East Java, told a national newspaper, “At first I thought they were boxes containing toys but then it turned out they were filled with gold jewelry.”

The owner of the jewels, a Balinese woman named Desak Ayu, rushed to the rubbish tip, desperately seeking her personal treasure trove she suspected had been thrown out with the trash. The jewels, valued at an estimated Rp. 300 million (US$30,000), were handed back to Desak who managed to correctly describe the missing items.

Pleased to have her jewels back in her personal possession, she gave the young man an undisclosed sum of money and a supply of staple foodstuffs.

When quizzed by the press regarding why he returned valuable jewelry he could just as easily have kept and sold, Ahmad said he would prefer to live a simple, honest life rather than cause economic misfortune to others.


You Must Remember This
A Taste of Morocco At Gending Kedis – Saturday, April 27 2013

A rare opportunity for an evening’s escape to old Casablanca awaits on Saturday, April 27, 2013 at The Gending Kedis Luxury Villa & Spa Estate in Jimbaran where a limited number of guests will enjoy authentic Moroccan cuisine prepared by a visiting Chef Abderrahim Touqo.
The dining room will be reminiscent of Morocco with a whole rang of delicious dishes prepared by Chef Touqo, who recently served as Chef at Maroush Moroccan Restaurant at Jakarta’s Crowne Plaza Hotel.

Keeping the evening lively will be a belly dancing performances.

Seating is limited and reservations are essential from dinner which will be served from 7:30.

A very affordable price of Rp. 285,000 (US$28.50) net assures that the evening will be a sell out.

Bookings will be taken on a first-come-first-served basis by telephoning ++62-(0)361-708906 or [Emailing]


If Only We Had Said That
An Editorial from the Phuketawan Tourism News Cuts Both Ways When it Comes to Bali and Phuket’s Future Development

A recent editorial in the Phuketwan Tourism News by Alan Morison and Chutima Sidasathian entitled “Phuket And Bali: Why a Small, Crowded Airport Might Be Just What Phuket Needs” is well worth sharing with the readers of Bali Update.

The well-written article discusses the risk of becoming a tourism destination favorite without first devising a carefully thought out development plan that addresses issues of sustainability and carrying capacity.

Below we share the Phuketwan Tourism News editorial in its entirety:

Phuket And Bali: Why a Small, Crowded Airport Might Be Just What Phuket Needs

By Alan Morison and Chutima Sidasathian

This was the introduction to an article last month about Bali in the Jakarta Post:

''Pristine beaches and seas are now littered with plastic waste, footpaths and roads in several tourism areas are in dangerous states of disrepair, mountains near world heritage listed parks are being quarried out of existence, forests of billboards have replaced jungles, rivers are riddled with trash and traffic is almost at gridlock. Welcome to Bali 2013.''

With just a few minor changes, a similar paragraph could be written about Phuket. Contributor Trisha Sertori's article was headlined simply 'Tipping Point.'

And that about sums it up. Bali and Phuket are both racing towards the edge of the same cliff. The problem is that nobody can see that cliff, because the race is taking place in the dark.

There is no race plan, no strategy for still being able to attract tourists to a pleasant, natural destination in five, 10 or 20 years.

Voices of common sense are being heard on Bali, just as they are on Phuket. ''What Bali needs is all people to sit together and plan Bali's tourism into the future,'' says Sulasa Jaya of the Indonesian Hotel and Restaurant Association.

''Now it is growing like a wild horse as investors wait for rain to fall from the sky (manna from heaven). We need tourism, but not out of control.''

Similar utterances have come from people on Phuket, perhaps most frequently lately from Bhuritt Maswongsa, Vice President of the Phuket Tourism Association.

He's calling for a two-year moratorium on growth in tourism on Phuket so that Phuket infrastructure can catch up.

''The tourists need to be told it is going to happen,'' he told Phuketwan. ''They will continue to come. But unless Phuket catches up with its infrastructure needs, the best of times for Phuket tourism may be over.''

In many ways, the race is now on to see which of the two destinations can back away from the cliff fastest, and head in the opposite direction towards something called ''sustainable development.''

We don't think there's any such thing because everyone's definition of ''sustainable development'' is different. What really needs to be achieved is a balance with Nature.

That said, Bali and Phuket remain appealing holiday destinations. Both islands are stacked high with first-rate resorts and villa accommodation.

Both have diversified so that holidays are no longer all about the beaches and the coral reefs.

Yet the quality of the beaches and the reefs, the natural environment, remains the critical factor in where people go for holidays.

While Phuket's tourism numbers continue to rise year on year, Bali's numbers turned down in January.

Whether this is a response to rising problems with congested roads, garbage on the beaches, a less natural experience or a combination of factors, this year will probably tell.

The point is that the warning signs are there for Phuket, even if for the time being the alarms are only sounding in Bali.

The main advantage Phuket has over Bali is that while Phuket is smaller, it has Phang Nga and Krabi as neighbors and development in those provinces has been slower.

Odd as it may seem, the other advantage is the size of Phuket's airport. Bali is building bigger, larger airports to cope with greater numbers of tourists.

Some people may see this as an advantage. Right now, we don't think it is.

Not being able to grow beyond the capacity to handle 12.5 million arrivals and departures may yet prove to be the wisest decision that the managers of Phuket International Airport have failed to make.

That gives Phuket an upper limit on so called ''carrying capacity'' and future development. The way everything else is going, a crowded airport might turn out to be the best thing that ever happened to Phuket.


Planning for Sustainability
Bali’s Desire to Formulate a Master Plan for Development Will Likely Meet Resistance by Island’s Regents and Mayors

The Bali Daily (The Jakarta Post) says the provincial government of Bali is “planning to draft a strategic master plan on tourism development.”

Bali’s governor Made Mangku Pastika said: “We’re eager to improve the tourism sector and build linkages with other sectors including agriculture. Our priority program is drafting a strategic master plan that manages the tourism sector.”

The Governor is seeking input from all tourism stakeholders, including the Indonesian Tourism Industry Association (GIPI), in drafting the Master Plan.

The plan is expected to deal with steps to preserve Bali’s agricultural character on an island where tourism has supplanted farming to become the dominant force in the economy. Tourism is now calculated to comprise 66% of Bali’s total economy with a diminishing agricultural sector making up only 19% of the economy.

Pastika commented: “Bali has a different economic structure from other provinces in Indonesia. We rely on tourism as the leading sector.”

Suggesting that controls are lacking, Pastika said that tourism needs to be controlled in order to realize sustainable development. Moreover, accommodation developers are refusing to incorporate Balinese architectural accents in their finished buildings. Adding: “Once, I was invited to a new hotel facility in Kuta. I really deplored that the hotel didn’t adopt Balinese architecture and I spoke to the management about the issue directly. We have to realize that Balinese architecture is a must for all investment on the island.”

The proposed Master Plan will also address means to control the current accommodation boom in Bali that is resulting in unhealthy price competition.

Planners will also be asked to incorporate new business sectors in the Master Plan, such as retirement tourism, sports tourism and cruise tourism.

Some sources are expressing pessimism, doubting that any final Master Plan will not be embraced by the regencies and metropolitan areas of Bali.

Efforts by the governor to introduce an island-wide zoning law and a moratorium on new hotel building have been zealously resisted by the Island’s Regents and Mayors who are unprepared to release control of their lucrative right to issue easements and licenses.


Horas!
Batak Christian Protestant Church (HKBP) Church Bazaar on Sunday, May 5, 2013

The Ministry of the Batak Christian Protestant Church (HKBP) of Jimbaran, Nusa Dua will hold a fundraising event at the HKBP Church on Jalan Belitung No. 6, Denpasar from 12:00 am until 5:00 pm on Sunday, May 5, 2013.

The afternoon’s activities will include a charity auction of paintings, furniture, Batak art and other items. A free lunch and refreshments will also be provided.

All proceeds from the day will go towards the cost of land acquisition for a HKBP Church in Jimbaran, Nusa Dua, Bali.

For more information telephone Gunawan ++62-(0)85 935 266 175 or Saroha at ++62(0)812 233 3312

[Email Gunawan] or [Email Saroha


How Ya Gonna Keep ‘Em Down on the Farm?
Agriculture Programs Boosts Bali Farmer’s Livelihoods

Although the provincial administration says that the income of farmers in Bali continues to increase annually, wages earned by agriculturalists still remain below the average per capita income figures in 2012.

At a plenary meeting of the Bali Legislative Council in Denpasar on Tuesday, April 2, 2013, Bali Governor Made Mangku Pastika said, “The farmers’ annual per capita income has continued to increase from an average Rp 6 million [US$600] in 2008 to Rp 9 million (US$900) in 2012.”

While delivering the accountability report for Bali’s integrated agriculture (Simantri) program, The Jakarta Post reports that Pastika considered the improvement of farmers’ welfare to be of major importance in the context of developing Bali’s agriculture industry. Pastika said, “In order to support food self-sufficiency here in Bali, development in the agriculture sector was addressed to encourage optimum agricultural resources, while simultaneously improving the welfare of farmers in Bali.”

The Simantri program has been designated to develop Bali’s agriculture sector, offering financial and technical assistance to farming collectives. 325 farmers’ groups are currently involved in the program with 75 of these joining in 2013.

To qualify for assistance farmers must be willing to adopt organic practices including the use of non-chemical fertilizers. The program also involves responsible stockbreeding practices and the establishment of biogas power plants. Biogas, bio-pesticides and organic fertilizer are produced from animal waste.

The Bali Agriculture Agency head, Ida Bagus Wisnuardana, admitted that despite the income growth, many obstacles to further growth remain. The report disclosed that despite the income growth, farmers’ annual per capital income was below the Island’s average of Rp 20.74 million (US$2,074) in 2012.

Wisnuardana claims “the main obstacle is the limited land owned by farmers.” Yet he remains hopeful that the program’s long-term target of increasing the farmers’ annual per capita income to Rp 12 million can be achieved. “We targeted doubling the farmers’ income compared to that of 2008. We are optimistic that we can reach our target,” he said.

Head of the Subak Research Center at Udayana University Wayan Windia considers the growth in the farmers’ income as an inadequate indicator that the welfare of the farmers has also increased. “Their income could have increased, but expenses could have increased at a greater level than their income, as inflation has also increased,” Windia said.

Windia added that tax subsidies are also important for improving the farmers’ welfare. “Land tax has burdened many farmers. The (tax) subsidy really needs to be implemented.”

Windia also suggested that without empowering subak – the traditional water management system of Bali, the Simantri program will be unable to run at an optimal level to strengthen the farmers’ economic condition.

Contributed by Nahhan Prudy


Children as Commodities of Tourism
Calls for Child Sex Ring In Bali To Be Investigated

The Bali Child Protection Institute is demanding police investigate the conduct of a 47-year-old Japanese man who has allegedly had sexual relations with underage girls, and is alleged to be managing a prostitution ring in Bali.

Secretary of the children’s rights group, Titik Suhariyati, said that the case became known to authorities when a high school student from the Jambrana district came forward with allegations that she and several other minors had been paid my the man to have sex with him and his associates.

The Straits Times reports that the man is though to have lured the girls’ with cash and mobile phones to his villa in Perancak village, Jembrana.

According to The Jakarta Globe, the Institute also identified one other school-aged girl who also claims to have been a victim of the man.

"We're still investigating this matter and collecting more evidence," said Suhariyati.

Chairman of the National Commission for Child Protection, Arist Merdeka Sirait, said that the man could be charged with human trafficking. The police could also begin an investigation before a report was filed. "The police can't let this case slide, especially since it appears to have caused quite a commotion in the local community," said Sirait.

Sirait added that he planned to visit Bali to ask police to begin an investigation into the claims, including the accusation that at least one of the girls many have contracted the HIV virus.

Bali continues to be the site of many sex-related criminal cases. In November 2012 and Indonesian woman running a prostitution ring was charged for multiple offences including human trafficking. She employed over 1,800 sex workers in her multi-city network.
 
Contributed by Nahhan Prudy


Plaga Wine. Play.
Indowines Launches Range of Highly Affordable Wines in Bali

Indowines is busily launching its Plaga range of wines made from imported Chilean and Western Australian grapes and bottled in Indonesia.

During a series of tastings conducted across the Island, Plaga is initially promoting 3 varietals: Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Rose. Later, Plaga Cabernet Sauvignon will join the brand line.

Branding their wines as modern, fresh and playful – the three wines tasted on Sunday, April 7, 2013 were light and lasting, well suited to tropical fare and Bali’s warm climate.

Produced to be drank now – but with a shelf life of at least a year, don’t look for vintage years on the labels of Plaga. Targeted towards youthful drinkers looking for refreshment at an affordable price – the average Plaga drinker most like doesn’t have a wine cellar or the patience to keep a wine until it matures.

Wine lovers young and old are certain to rejoice at the introduction of these eminently drinkable vin table that are retail priced at less than Rp. 130,000 (US$13) a bottle.

Sold at an even lower price to restaurants and retailers, Indowines is hopeful that their Plaga range will be sold at near retail by local restaurants in order to once again make wine an affordable accompaniment to a dinner out.

Plaga Wines will soon be available across Indonesia with initial launches now underway in Bali, Lombok and the Gilis with Jakarta, Surabaya and other major cities to follow shortly.

Tasting Notes

Plaga Cabernet Sauvignon
Retail Price: Rp. 129,000 (US$12.90)

Tasting notes
Plaga Cabernet Sauvignon is bold, fruity and powerful, with a ruby-red
color reminiscent of young Italian wines. A complex aroma blends red
fruits such as berries and plums, with hints of black pepper and spices.
Oak aging introduces memories of vanilla and coffee. Young, fruity and soft
on the palate, a delicate wine with good structure, and a taste that is fresh,
round and well balanced.

Technical notes
Origin: Western Australian grapes 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Syrah.
Aged: Three months in barrels of French and American Oak.
Fermentation: 14 days with French yeast at temperature of 15 degrees Celsius.
Alcohol 12.4%

Occasion
The perfect compliment to a hearty meal, whether a rich and savory beef rendang, a juicy rump steak or a spicy pasta. It also combines beautifully with desserts, especially those made with chocolate and cinnamon.

Description
Color: Ruby red, the color of young Italian wine
Aroma: a complex blend of red fruits such as berries and plums, black
pepper and spices. Oak aging introduces memories of vanilla and coffee.
Palate: Soft, young and fruity, a delicate wine with good structure and a taste that is fresh, round and well balanced

Plaga Sauvignon Blanc
Retail Price: Rp. 119,000 (US$11.90)

Tasting notes
Plaga Sauvignon Blanc is refreshing and playful, with a crisp, elegant flavor that hints of tropical fruit, citrus and honey. A good balance of acidity with sweetness enhances its character.

A highly palatable young wine with a long, fresh finish.

Technical Notes
Origin: Western Australian grapes, 90% Sauvignon Blanc, 10% Semillon. Fermentation: 12 days with French yeast at 13 degrees Celsius.
Alcohol: 12.2%

Occasion
Plaga Sauvignon Blanc is light enough to have a glass of wine at lunch, but equally well suited to balmy tropical evenings. A food-friendly wine, it goes particularly well with fresh fish or seafood including sushi and sashimi, as well as salads, vegetarian dishes and lean white meat.

Description
Color: Light yellow with palest green reflections
Aroma: Fresh and mild citrus aromas, imbued with the elegant presence of tropical fruits.
Palate: A fresh citrus taste that perfectly balances acidity and sweetness. Easy to drink with a fresh and long finish

Plaga Chardonnay
Retail Price Rp. 119,000 (US$11.90)

Tasting notes
Plaga Chardonnay has a pure and simple flavor that hints of the tropics, with a taste that is young, fresh and highly suited to new drinkers. Imbued with notes of tropical fruits like pineapple and mango, with just a hint of honey. Fresh and long in the mouth with a clean finish and a natural acidity
that combines well with the sweetness of tropical fruit. A light and easy to drink Chardonnay.

Technical notes
Origin: 100% Western Australian Chardonnay grapes.
Fermentation: 13 days with French yeast at 13 degrees Celsius.
Alcohol: 12.2%

Occasion
The world’s favorite white wine, Chardonnay is highly versatile and suitable for lunch, dinner any time between. Try pairing with seafood, baked white meat, vegetarian dishes and light, aromatic coconut based curries.

Description
Color: Light gold, straw color.
Aroma: Notes of tropical fruit such as pineapple and mango imbued with subtle hints of honey. A young modern Chardonnay, that is very light and fresh with a pleasant acidity.
Palate: Fresh and long in the mouth with a clean finish and a natural acidity that combine well with the sweetness of tropical fruit.

Plaga Rosé
Retail Price Rp. 129,000 (US$12.90)

Tasting notes
A pale pink Summery wine, best served chilled. A light, aromatic aroma reveals floral notes. The taste is naturally sweet, soft and fruity with a refreshing acidity. A fresh, bright and young wine with a clean finish.

Technical notes
Origins: 100% Cabernet Sauvignon grapes from Western Australia.
Fermentation: 10 days with French Yeast at 18 – 22 degrees Celsius.
Alcohol: 12%

Occasion
Rose is best served chilled. It mixes well with both red and white meat and is ideally paired with canapés and starters. Try it with salad, pasta, fish, rice dishes and rice dishes such as paella and nasi goreng.

Description
Color: A pale pink, salmon color evokes the wines of Provence.
Aroma: Light aromatic intensity, once the wine is open the floral notes jump to the nose.
Palate: Soft and fruity on the palate with a refreshing acidity and a natural sweetness, that is fresh and young.

For more information telephone ++62-(0)361- 8477 232 or ++62-(0)361-756 781 [Email Plaga Wines]


Marginalization of an Island
Bali Language Teacher Protest the Removal of Balinese from the Formal Language Curriculum for 2013

Hundreds of university students studying the Balinese language (Basa Bali) demonstrated before the Bali Provincial House of Representatives on Monday, April 1, 2013, in an aspirational protest sending their demand to Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono in letters attached to balloons.

The protestors studying to become Balinese language teachers used the unique method of sending letters to the President tied to balloons to demand that the Balinese language be retained in the educational curriculum.

As reported by Kompas.com, the student also sent similar message addressed to Bali’s Governor, the Minister of Education, the Chairman of the National House of Representatives and other officials.

The protests followed an announcement by the central government that the Balinese language would be removed from the academic curriculum for 2013 as a course of formal language study, but relegated to a lower status and included in the curriculum for art and culture.


Take Me to Your Leader
West Balinese Man Could Face Long Prison Term Following Faked Pictures of an Alien Sent Via his Hand Phone

A prank played by a Balinese man in Tabanan has placed him in hot water with the police.

Gede Rai Sudarta (33) from Banjar Kamasan, Dajan Peken Village in Tabanan is now facing the possibility of imprisonment under the terms of regulations on information and electronic transactions, according to a report by the State News Agency Antara.

Rai caused a major stir that covered widely in the press when he began circulating via his new hand phone a picture of an alien being that he claimed had visited his home.

According to police in Tabanan, the picture – proven later to be a fictional photo alteration – could see Rai sentenced to a maximum of 12 years in prison and levied a fine of Rp. 2 billion (US$200,000).

Rai freely admitted that the prank photo of an alien was sent by his android hand phone purchased in January.

Rai said he didn’t realize his prank would become a source of public unrest.



Keeping Bali's Womenfolk Healthy
5th Annual Kartini Day Fundraiser on Friday, April 26, 2013 to Aid Women's Reproductive Health Projects in Bali.

The 5th Annual Kartini Day Fundraiser for the Yayasan Rama Sesana (YRS) will take place on Friday, April 26, 2013.

The daylong event comprised of bake sales, bazaar, massage, raffles, door prizes and medical examinations is intended to raise funds for YRSclinical and educational programs concerned with women’s reproductive health.

Among the major projects undertaken by YRS are a women’s health center at the main market in Denpasar and the development of two new clinics located at the Interan traditional market in Sanur and the Seririt traditional market in Singaraja, North Bali.

During the day of the event to be held at Jalan Pengembak #19 in Sanur guests are welcome to wander through the bazaar and bake sale, enjoy a massage and have the option of booking a private, on-site Pap smear performed by qualified doctors.

In the evening, a fundraising party will include an auction and door prizes. Friends can meet over drinks and enjoy canapés supplied by local eateries,

YRS 5th Annual Kartini Day Fundraiser
Jalan Pengembak #19 – Sanur, Bali
Friday, April 26, 2013

9:00 am – 3:00 pm – Bake Sale, Bazaar, massage and Pap Smear Tests
6:00 pm – 9:00 pm – Fundraising party, raffle, silent auction

Tickets: Evening Event Rp. 100,000 (US$10) in advance or Rp. 150,000 (US$15) at the door.

Pap Smear Test: Rp. 300,000 (US$30) or sponsor a friend or employee for Rp. 250,000 (US$25)

For more information [Email YRS] or telephone ++62-(0)3610247363 (Indonesian language) or ++62-(0)813 3929 4835 (English).

YRS is a non-profit, non-governmental organization founded in 1999 that provides quality health services, including clinical services on a donation basis. YRS also support educational programs to improve reproductive health in Bali.

[YRS Website]


 
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December 10, 2012

Bali Update #848
December 03, 2012

Bali Update #847
November 26, 2012

Bali Update #846
November 19, 2012

Bali Update #845
November 12, 2012

Bali Update #844
November 05, 2012

Bali Update #843
October 29, 2012

Bali Update #842
October 22, 2012

Bali Update #841
October 15, 2012

Bali Update #839
October 08, 2012

Bali Update #839
October 01, 2012

Bali Update #838
September 24, 2012

Bali Update #837
September 15, 2012

Bali Update #836
September 10, 2012

Bali Update #835
September 03, 2012

Bali Update #834
August 27, 2012

Bali Update #833
August 20, 2012

Bali Update #831
August 13, 2012

Bali Update #831
August 06, 2012

Bali Update #830
July 30, 2012

Bali Update #829
July 23, 2012

Bali Update #828
July 16, 2012

Bali Update #827
July 09, 2012

Bali Update #826
July 02, 2012

Bali Update #825
June 25, 2012

Bali Update #824
June 18, 2012

Bali Update #823
June 11, 2012

Bali Update #822
June 04, 2012

Bali Update #821
May 28, 2012

Bali Update #820
May 21, 2012

Bali Update #819
May 14, 2012

Bali Update #818
May 07, 2012

Bali Update #817
april 30, 2012

Bali Update #816
april 23, 2012

Bali Update #815
april 16, 2012

Bali Update #814
april 09, 2012

Bali Update #813
april 02, 2012

Bali Update #812
march 26, 2012

Bali Update #811
march 19, 2012

Bali Update #810
march 12, 2012

Bali Update #809
march 05, 2012

Bali Update #808
february 27, 2012

Bali Update #807
february 20, 2012

Bali Update #806
february 13, 2012

Bali Update #805
february 06, 2012

Bali Update #804
january 30, 2012

Bali Update #803
january 23, 2012

Bali Update #802
january 16, 2012

Bali Update #801
january 9, 2012

Bali Update #800
january 2, 2012

Bali Update #799
December 26, 2011

Bali Update #798
December 19, 2011

Bali Update #797
December 12, 2011

Bali Update #796
December 05, 2011

Bali Update #795
November 21, 2011

Bali Update #794
November 21, 2011

Bali Update #793
November 14, 2011

Bali Update #792
November 04, 2011

Bali Update #791
October 31, 2011

Bali Update #790
October 24, 2011

Bali Update #789
October 17, 2011

Bali Update #788
October 14, 2011

Bali Update #787
October 10, 2011

Bali Update #786
October 03, 2011

Bali Update #785
September 26, 2011

Bali Update #784
September 19, 2011

Bali Update #783
September 12, 2011

Bali Update #782
September 05, 2011

Bali Update #781
August 29, 2011

Bali Update #780
August 22, 2011

Bali Update #779
August 15, 2011

Bali Update #778
August 8, 2011

Bali Update #777
August 1, 2011

Bali Update #776
July 25, 2011

Bali Update #775
July 18, 2011

Bali Update #774
July 11, 2011

Bali Update #773
July 4, 2011

Bali Update #772
June 27, 2011

Bali Update #771
June 20, 2011

Bali Update #770
June 13, 2011

Bali Update #769
June 06, 2011

Bali Update #768
May 30, 2011

Bali Update #767
May 23, 2011

Bali Update #766
May 16, 2011

Bali Update #765
May 9, 2011

Bali Update #764
May 2, 2011

Bali Update #763
April 25, 2011

Bali Update #762
April 18, 2011

Bali Update #761
April 11, 2011

Bali Update #760
April 4, 2011

Bali Update #759
March 28, 2011

Bali Update #758
March 21, 2011

Bali Update #757
March 14, 2011

Bali Update #756
March 7, 2011

Bali Update #755
February 28, 2011

Bali Update #754
February 21, 2011

Bali Update #753
February 14, 2011

Bali Update #752
February 7, 2011

Bali Update #751
January 31, 2011

Bali Update #750
January 24, 2011

Bali Update #749
January 17, 2011

Bali Update #748
January 10, 2011

Bali Update #747
January 3, 2011

Bali Update #746
December 27, 2010

Bali Update #745
December 20, 2010

Bali Update #744
December 13, 2010

Bali Update #743
December 06, 2010

Bali Update #742
November 29, 2010

Bali Update #741
November 22, 2010

Bali Update #740
November 15, 2010

Bali Update #739
November 8, 2010

Bali Update #738
November 1, 2010

Bali Update #737
October 25, 2010

Bali Update #736
October 18, 2010

Bali Update #735
October 11, 2010

Bali Update #734
October 4, 2010

Bali Update #733
September 27, 2010

Bali Update #732
September 20, 2010

Bali Update #731
September 13, 2010

Bali Update #730
September 6, 2010

Bali Update #729
August 30, 2010

Bali Update #728
August 23, 2010

Bali Update #727
August 16, 2010

Bali Update #726
August 9, 2010

Bali Update #725
August 2, 2010

Bali Update #724
July 26, 2010

Bali Update #723
July 19, 2010

Bali Update #722
July 12, 2010

Bali Update #721
July 5, 2010

Bali Update #720
June 28, 2010

Bali Update #719
June 21, 2010

Bali Update #718
June 14, 2010

Bali Update #717
June 07, 2010

Bali Update #716
May 31, 2010

Bali Update #715
May 24, 2010

Bali Update #714
May 17, 2010

Bali Update #713
May 10, 2010

Bali Update #712
May 3, 2010

Bali Update #711
April 26, 2010

Bali Update #710
April 19, 2010

Bali Update #709
April 12, 2010

Bali Update #708
April 05, 2010

Bali Update #707
March 29, 2010

Bali Update #706
March 22, 2010

Bali Update #705
March 15, 2010

Bali Update #704
March 08, 2010

Bali Update #703
March 01, 2010

Bali Update #702
February 22, 2010

Bali Update #701
February 15, 2010

Bali Update #700
February 8, 2010

Bali Update #699
February 1, 2010

Bali Update #698
January 25, 2010

Bali Update #697
January 18, 2010

Bali Update #696
January 11, 2010

Bali Update #695
January 4, 2010

Bali Update #694
December 28, 2009

Bali Update #693
December 21, 2009

Bali Update #692
December 14, 2009

Bali Update #691
December 7, 2009

Bali Update #690
November 30, 2009

Bali Update #689
November 23, 2009

Bali Update #688
November 16, 2009

Bali Update #687
November 09, 2009

Bali Update #686
November 2, 2009

Bali Update #685
October 26, 2009

Bali Update #684
October 19, 2009

Bali Update #683
October 12, 2009

Bali Update #682
October 05, 2009

Bali Update #681
September 28, 2009

Bali Update #680
September 21, 2009

Bali Update #679
September 14, 2009

Bali Update #678
September 07, 2009

Bali Update #677
August 31, 2009

Bali Update #676
August 24, 2009

Bali Update #675
August 17, 2009

Bali Update #674
August 10, 2009

Bali Update #673
August 03, 2009

Bali Update #672
July 27, 2009

Bali Update #671
July 20, 2009

Bali Update #670
July 13, 2009

Bali Update #669
July 06, 2009

Bali Update #668
June 29, 2009

Bali Update #667
June 22, 2009

Bali Update #666
June 15, 2009

Bali Update #665
June 08, 2009

Bali Update #664
June 01, 2009

Bali Update #663
May 25, 2009

Bali Update #662
May 18, 2009

Bali Update #661
May 11, 2009

Bali Update #660
May 04, 2009

Bali Update #659
April 27, 2009

Bali Update #658
April 18, 2009

Bali Update #657
April 11, 2009

Bali Update #656
April 04, 2009

Bali Update #655
March 28, 2009

Bali Update #654
March 21, 2009

Bali Update #653
March 14, 2009

Bali Update #652
March 07, 2009

Bali Update #651
February 28, 2009

Bali Update #650
February 21, 2009

Bali Update #649
February 14, 2009

Bali Update #648
February 7, 2009

Bali Update #647
January 31, 2009

Bali Update #646
January 26, 2009

Bali Update #645
January 19, 2009

Bali Update #644
January 10, 2009

Bali Update #643
January 05, 2009

Bali Update #642
December 29, 2008

Bali Update #641
December 22, 2008

Bali Update #640
December 15, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #639
December 08, 2008

Bali Update #638
December 01, 2008

Bali Update #637
November 24, 2008

Bali Update #636
November 17, 2008

Bali Update #635
November 10, 2008

Bali Update #634
November 03, 2008

Bali Update #633
October 27, 2008

Bali Update #632
October 20, 2008

Bali Update #631
October 13, 2008

Bali Update #630
October 06, 2008

Bali Update #629
Septembe 29, 2008

Bali Update #628
September 22, 2008

Bali Update #627
September 15, 2008

Bali Update #626
September 08, 2008

Bali Update #625
September 01, 2008

Bali Update #624
August 25, 2008

Bali Update #623
August 18, 2008

Bali Update #622
August 11, 2008

Bali Update #621
August 04, 2008

Bali Update #620
July 28, 2008

Bali Update #619
July 21, 2008

Bali Update #618
July 14, 2008

Bali Update #617
July 07, 2008

Bali Update #616
June 30, 2008

Bali Update #615
June 23, 2008

Bali Update #614
June 16, 2008

Bali Update #613
June 09, 2008

Bali Update #612
June 02, 2008

Bali Update #611
May 26, 2008

Bali Update #610
May 19, 2008

Bali Update #609
May 12, 2008

Bali Update #608
May 05, 2008

Bali Update #607
April 28, 2008

Bali Update #606
April 21, 2008

Bali Update #605
April 14, 2008

Bali Update #604
April 07, 2008

Bali Update #603
March 31, 2008

Bali Update #602
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #601
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #600
March 10, 2008

Bali Update #599
March 03, 2008

Bali Update #598
February 25, 2008

Bali Update #597
February 18, 2008

Bali Update #596
February 11, 2008

Bali Update #595
February 04, 2008

Bali Update #594
January 28, 2008

Bali Update #593
January 21, 2008

Bali Update #592
January 14, 2008

Bali Update #591
January 07, 2008

Bali Update #590
December 31, 2007

Bali Update #589
December 24, 2007

Bali Update #588
December 17, 2007

Bali Update #587
December 10, 2007

Bali Update #586
December 03, 2007

Bali Update #585
November 26, 2007

Bali Update #584
November 19, 2007

Bali Update #583
November 12, 2007

Bali Update #582
November 05, 2007

Bali Update #581
October 29, 2007

Bali Update #580
October 22, 2007

Bali Update #579
October 15, 2007

Bali Update #578
October 08, 2007

Bali Update #577
October 01, 2007

Bali Update #576
September 24, 2007

Bali Update #575
September 17, 2007

Bali Update #574
September 10, 2007

Bali Update #573
September 03, 2007

Bali Update #572
August 27, 2007

Bali Update #571
August 20, 2007

Bali Update #570
August 13, 2007

Bali Update #569
August 06, 2007

Bali Update #568
July 30, 2007

Bali Update #567
July 23, 2007

Bali Update #566
July 16, 2007

Bali Update #565
July 09, 2007

Bali Update #564
July 02, 2007

Bali Update #563
June 25, 2007

Bali Update #562
June 18, 2007

Bali Update #561
June 11, 2007

Bali Update #560
June 04, 2007

Bali Update #559
May 28, 2007

Bali Update #558
May 21, 2007

Bali Update #557
May 14, 2007

Bali Update #556
May 07, 2007

Bali Update #555
April 30, 2007

Bali Update #554
April 23, 2007

Bali Update #553
April 16, 2007

Bali Update #552
April 09, 2007

Bali Update #551
April 02, 2007

Bali Update #550
March 26, 2007

Bali Update #549
March 19, 2007

Bali Update #548
March 12, 2007

Bali Update #547
March 05, 2007

Bali Update #546
February 26, 2007

Bali Update #545
February 19, 2007

Bali Update #544
February 12, 2007

Bali Update #543
February 05, 2007

Bali Update #542
January 29, 2007

Bali Update #541
January 22, 2007

Bali Update #540
January 15, 2007

Bali Update #539
January 08, 2007

Bali Update #538
January 01, 2007

Bali Update #537
December 25, 2006

Bali Update #536
December 18, 2006

Bali Update #535
December 11, 2006

Bali Update #534
December 04, 2006

Bali Update #533
November 27, 2006

Bali Update #532
November 20, 2006

Bali Update #531
November 13, 2006

Bali Update #530
November 06, 2006

Bali Update #529
October 30, 2006

Bali Update #528
October 23, 2006

Bali Update #527
October 16, 2006

Bali Update #526
October 9, 2006

Bali Update #525
October 2, 2006

Bali Update #524
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #523
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #522
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #521
September 04, 2006

Bali Update #520
August 28, 2006

Bali Update #519
August 21, 2006

Bali Update #518
August 14, 2006

Bali Update #517
August 07, 2006

Bali Update #516
July 31, 2006

Bali Update #515
July 24, 2006

Bali Update #514
July 17, 2006

Bali Update #513
July 10, 2006

Bali Update #512
July 03, 2006

Bali Update #511
June 26, 2006

Bali Update #510
June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006
 

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