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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #934 - 27 July 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


Bali Manhunt Underway
Governor Orders All Out Effort to Capture Man Who Raped and Robbed Australian Tourist at Seminyak Villa

Bal's governor Made Mangku Pastika is coordinating with the Island's Chief of Police, Inspector General Arif Wachyunadi, to quickly apprehend those responsible for the rape and robbery of a 28-year-old Australian tourist, L.K. Taylor.

As reported by Kompas.com, Pastika said on Tuesday, April 30, 2013,. “I have spoken with the Chief of Police for Bali and asked that he capture and bring the perpetrator to court.”

Police have been assigned from Bali’s police headquarters to assist officers from the North Kuta police precinct who are investigating the attack that has generated international publicity and raised widespread concerns over safety for tourists staying in villas in Bali.

Taylor was robbed and raped on Saturday, April 27, 2013 while staying a Villa Damais on Jalan Bumbak No. 189 in Seminyak.

The villas website claims the units and their occupants are guarded by 24-hour security.

Taylor reported to police that she was sleeping when an intruder entered her bedroom, raped her and made off with three iPads, two Iphones, and a sum of cash.

Police have a sketch of the man being sought for the crime and an intensive manhunt is underway.


Keeping Names Straight in Bali
An Introduction to Naming Codes in Bali: Counting on Wayan, Made, Nyoman and Ketut

Even a visitor coming to Bali for the briefest period of time can’t help but notice how many people have similar sounding names such as Wayan, Made, Nyoman, Ketut, Ida Bagus and alike.

Also frequently encountered are the prefixes of “I” and “Ni”. The letter “I” preceding Wayan, for instance, signifies a male, while “Ni” would precede a woman’s name.

A person named “I Wayan” or “Ni Wayan” would typically hail from the largest and lowest Sudra Caste of Balinese society.

names can also provide clues to ancestral trades. For instance, a blacksmith or metal workers might be know by the family name of “Pande,” while in traditional Balinese society a person making steel weapons or metal implements is know as a "Pande Besi."

“Ida Bagus” is a sign of respect for someone who is indeed “bagus” or handsome, with “Ida Bagus” considered a title of honor. “Anak Agung,” often represented by A.A. when seen in a printed form, is the prefix reserved for Balinese royalty.

But let’s get back to “Wayan." “The name “Wayan” (sometimes shortened to “Yan”) is derived from “Wokalayan” a word that means “the most mature” and reserved for the first-born. The second-born is called “Made” and is derived form the word Madia for middle. The third-born is designated by “Nyoman” (“Man” or “Mang” for short), taken from the Balinese word “uman” that suggests “the last” or “remainder” - reflecting a Balinese view that an ideal family size should be limited to three children.

In ancient times before the advent of modern birth control appliances and pills, traditional healers, herbalists and other measures - birth control sometimes failed resulting in a fourth child, who would be given the prefix of “Ketut.”

Ketut is presumed to come from the ancient term “Kitut” - a name given to the smallest banana on the stem. Seen a “bonus” and much loved for its sweetness - a Ketut may represent the sweetest and most  loved addition to a Balinese family.

As recently explained by Beritbali.com, Balinese attention to names and labeling also extends to the rats that populate rice fields. Balinese farmers superstitiously avoid calling rats by their Balinese name of “bikul,” preferring, instead, to call the rodents “Jero Ketut” signifying a lesser or smaller (Jero) gentleman. Although despised for the damage they can cause to crops, the clan of Jero Ketut is still seen as playing an integral part in nature’s well-balanced scheme of things. Accordingly, when rats become so populous that farmers have no choice but to eradicate “Jero Ketut” en masse, funereal rites and ritualized cremations are held in their honor.

Child Number Five?

For particularly fecund Balinese couples or people who simply want a large family with lots of children, the naming cycle resumes all over againwith the fifth-born named Wayan, the sixth Made, and so on

Just when you feel certain that you have the cycle of Balinese names well in hand, you’ll encounter a “Wayan” who is called “Putu,” “Kompiang,” or “Gede” – all alternative prefixes for the first-born. Variations on a 2nd child named “Made” might be “Kadek” or “Nengah.” The third-child is not always called “Nyoman,” with “Komang” sometimes used instead. Meanwhile, “Ketut” stands alone with generally no synonym used for the fourth-born.

Like their neighboring Javanese, Balinese do not typically have a family name. However, some Balinese have adopted a clan identifier that could be, for example,  “Dusak” or “Pendit” and could result in a name such as “Wayan Dujana Pendit.

In recent times, some Balinese modify their names to include the name of a famous ancestor.

Some Balinese are also now busily adopting Western monikers resulting in a “Ni Luh Ayu Cindy” or “I Ketut Bobby.”

Sudra Caste

The Sudra, Bali’s largest and lowest cast, has no special naming ritual beyond the use of “I” before a boy’s name or “Ni” before a girl’s name.

Comprising about 90% of all Balinese, the Sudra (peasants and craftsmen) are not isolated or deemed untouchable, as might be the case in India. Sudra members of Bali often seek counsel from upper caste members on religious matters, such as the selection of propitious days for ceremonies and for the commencement of major projects.

Wesya Caste

The Wesya Caste has specific names such as “I Dewa” for a man or “I Dewa Ayu” for a female. “Desak” is also a name found among the Wesya Caste traditionally reserved for vassals of a Raja and merchants.

K’satria Caste

Also known as Satria, this caste of warriors and kings will be distinguished with names such as “I Gusti Ngurah” (male) or “I Gusti Ayu” (female). Other names of the Satria caste are “Anak Agung “(male), “Anak Agung Ayu” or “Anak Agung Istri” (female).

Look also for “Tjokorda” (shortened to “Tjok”) for a male or “Tjokorda Istri (female).

Brahmana Caste

The religiously elite caste of the priests and the teachers – the Brahmana caste are designated by names such as “Ida Bagus” (male) and “Ida Ayu” female.


Thatís Entertainment
Bali Agung Show at Bali Safari and Marine Park Now Expanded to Six Days a Week

Bali’s one–hour colossal stage production involving a caste of hundreds of dancers, musicians and animals at the Bali Safari and Marine Park have increase the weekly run of shows to six, according to Hans Manansang, the general manager of the Park.

The show previously ran four days a week.

Proud of the enthusiastic response the show has received from both domestic and international visitors to the Park, Manasang feels vindicated in his vision that Bali was waiting for a theatrical spectacular framed around a classic Balinese story-line.

The show presented mid-afternoon six days a week on a stage that accommodates gods and goddesses, a herd of elephants, volcanoes and even a small lake tells the story of an ancient Balinese King – Prabu Jaya Pangus.

Hans see the chance in the future to expand the types of performances presented on the Park high-tech stage (3,200 square meters) and state-of-the-art theater venue.

Related Links

Bali Safari & Marine Park -Jungle Hopper Package 

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Flying More, Earning Less
Garuda Blames Q1 Losses on Worldwide Seasonal Decline in Air Travel

Indonesian national flag carrier Garuda Indonesia recorded a net loss in Q1 of 2013 amounting to US$33.7 million, a worsening by 215% over the results reported by the Airline in Q1 2012.

Bisnis.com quoted the CEO of Garuda, Emirsyah Satar, who blamed the drop in profitability on reduced demand for seats affecting many carriers internationally.

Said Satar at a press conference in Jakarta on Tuesday, April 30, 2013, ”So this downturn was not only experienced by Garuda, but by all airlines.”

He went on to explain that an annual cyclical slowdown in airline traffic occurs worldwide during Q1. Adding, “the factor of extreme weather during Q1 of each year also contributes to reduced demand.”

The financial director of Garuda, Handito Hardjono contributed that a number of factors converged to reduce profit by 20.7% or US$20.1 million over the first three months of the year.

And, while the Airline suffered losses in Q1, Garuda's income actually experienced a 12.5% increase from US$717.4 million in 2012 to US$807.2 million for the first quarter of 2013.

Garuda Indonesia Group’s market share increased from 30,3% to 35.2% in Q1 2013, These market share figure also include Garuda’s subsidiary Citilink who managed to increase their market share in Q1 from 3% to 6.9%.

Passenger uplift by Garuda during Q1 2013 increased 20.7% to 5.56 million passengers. Meanwhile, cargo uplift increased 24.2% totaling 81.300 tons.

Flight frequencies flown by Garuda increased 23.5% operating 44,224 flights during the first quarter of 2013.

Also during the first quarter of 2013, Garuda took delivery of four new Airbus A320s and two Bombardier CRJ-199s

Garuda Indonesia now operates a fleet of 112 planes.


Dogs that Dodge
Mass Rabies Inoculation Program Continues; Authorities Having Difficulties Gathering Stray Dogs for Vaccination

The Bali Post reports that programs underway to vaccinate Bali’s canine population as a means to eliminate rabies from the Island are being thwarted, at least in part, by feral dogs and unrestrained pets that are difficult to capture and inoculate.

The chief of the Agriculture and Livestock Service (Kadistanak) for Buleleng, North Bali, Nyoman Swatantra, admitted to the press on Wednesday, May 1, 2013, that is team were reporting difficulties in gathering dogs for vaccination.

Homeowners who own more than one dog, are finding it difficult to capture both dogs for shots. Explained Swatantra, “there was one owner who had four dogs, but our staff were only able to capture one of the animals for vaccination.”

Confronted with these difficulties, Swatantra confirmed that the current phase of mass vaccination would continue through June 2013. To vaccinate the dog missed on the first visit, his teams would return to the affected villages. He called on village officials and dog owners to help his teams achieve their goal of administering shots to all dogs in each community.

Swatantra said reports gathered from each sub-district in Buleleng show that 12,623 dogs, 187 cats and 15 monkeys have been vaccinated.


A Smoke Screen
Badung-Bali Legislature Ratify Smoke-Free Rules

Seputarbali.com reports that in a final session of the current term of Bali’s Badung House of Representatives (DPRD-Badung), legislators ratified rules for Smoking-free area for the regency, addressing both hotels and government buildings.

The secretary for Bali Child Protection Agency, Titik Suhariyati, welcomed the ratification of no-smoking rules. She was initially concerned that delays would occur to the ratification of rules and penalties for smoking in public places in Bali’s southernmost regency.

Said Titik: “We welcome the ratification of the smoke-free rules for Badung. We also hope that these rules will help reduce the consumption of cigarettes.

She said the new smoke-free zone rules that are now law in Badung are not intended merely to forbid people to smoke. “The meaning of smoke-free zones is very simple – don't smoke in certain areas such as schools, medical facilities and other places. If you want to smoke, please use the areas designated for smoking,” Titik said.

Meanwhile the vice-regent of Badung, I Ketut Sudikerta, also expressed his deep appreciation to legislators who ratified the anti-smoking rules.


They Still Call Bali Home
Indonesia is the Second Most Popular Foreign Holiday Destination for Australians after New Zealand

The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Thailand, Indonesia and the U.S.A. remain the most popular destinations for holidaying Australians who continue to travel abroad in record numbers.

And, while Thailand, Indonesia and the U.S.A. grew in popularity over the past 12 months, New Zealand remains the most preferred destination for outbound Australians.

Precipitated by a strong Australian dollar, a record 8 million Australian took an overseas trip in 2012, an increase of 8% over 2011.

Sean Thompson of the Australian Bureau of Statistics interpreted the record number of his fellow country traveling, explaining, "This meant that an extra 6,000 Australians per day decided to take a trip overseas compared to just three years earlier."

The number of Australians visiting the top five favorites overseas destination during the past year were:
  • New Zealand (1.1 million)
  • Indonesia (910,000) up 13%
  • U.S.A. (819,000) up 9%
  • Thailand (600,000) up 23%
  • Britain (487,000)
The role of the stronger Australian dollar cannot be overestimated as a factor in more foreign travel by Australians. In 2008-2009 the Australian dollar traded at US$0.75 but traded at US$1.03 last year.

Over that same period travel to Indonesia by Australian has doubled.

These figures were published in a report published in late April 2013 by the Australian Bureau of Statistics.


We Work Hard for our Money
Bali Workers March For Higher Wages on May Day

While large public political and rallies in Bali are rare; the taste for such public displays possibly tempered by the relative prosperity of the province in comparison to other areas of Indonesia and concerns that demonstrations may deter people from visiting Bali.

An exception to this unspoken rule, however, ocurred on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 when hundreds of workers, mostly from the Island’s tourism industry, gathered in front of the governor’s office in downtown Denpasar to mark International Workers Day.

The protestors voiced pronouncements criticizing the lack of attention given by policymakers to the economic welfare of the working class in Bali. As reported by The Jakarta Post, representatives from the Bali Workers Union Forum carried banners demanding a higher minimum wage level be established.

Ihsan Tantowi, who is a member of the Forum and chairman of the National Front for the Struggle of Indonesian Workers (FNPBI), claims the current minimum wage level set by the government is insufficient to improve the welfare of workers. “The minimum wage is unfair for workers, while companies continue to thrive with huge profits,” he said.

The current minimum wage in Bali set by the government is Rp. 1,181,000 (US$118) per month. This figure is 20% more than the minimum wage in effect just one year before.

The minimum wage varies by regency in Bali with Badung having the highest minimum wage of Rp. 1,401,000 (US$140).

Protestors are calling on the government to set different minimum wage levels for different sectors of the economy, claiming the tourism sector is able to pay higher living wage levels to their workers.

Protestors also called for an end to outsourcing and the “daily worker system” that allows companies to pay their staff on a day-to-day basis in order to avoid paying other benefits mandated under law.


Bali Hard Pressed for a Free Press
Protestors Complain of Bali Post's Unbalanced and Unfair Political Coverage

Beritabali.com reports that nearly two hundred demonstrators under the banner of the Bali Alliance for a Fair Press conducted peaceful demonstrations in front of the Media Bali Post Office in downtown Denpasar on Thursday, May 2, 2013 demanding the press conglomerate become more objective in their coverage of the current governor’s race in Bali.

In a statement read by Rena Febriyanti, the Alliance asked the Bali Post and Bali TV to cease publishing provocative and one-sided news favoring one ticket in the coming election, claiming the lack of objectivity threatened community unity in Bali.

The Bali Post is openly  in support of the PDIP candidate for governor and vice-governor, AA Ngurah Puspayoga and Dewa Nyoman Sukrawan. The Bali Post Media Group is involved in a long-standing and bitter personal dispute with the incumbent, Governor Made Mangku Pastika, who recently won a law suit against the Bali Post that requires a front-age open apology be published in a number of local newspapers after the Newspaper was found guilty of slandering the governor by incorrectly reporting statements allegedly made by Pastika in their newspaper. The judgment remains under appeal with the courts.

Fenriyanti’s statement describe present coverage by the Media Bali Post Group as divisive and called on the people of Bali not to be provoked, but remain steadfast in their desire to have a peaceful election.

According to Kompas.com, demonstrations were also held at the Monument of the People’s Struggle in downtown Denpasar. A group of religious leaders ceremoniously burnt copies of the Bali Post in order to underline their view that the leading Bali paper lacks neutrality in its political coverage of the upcoming governors race.

Intended as both a protest and a cleansing ceremony, the religious leaders prayed that evil behavior by the paper might come to an end. Wayan Bhaskara, one of the leaders of the ceremony, said the “cremation” was meant to bring the paper back to its correct function.

Protestor pointed to the Bali Post’s tendency to carry only news about AA Ngurah Puspayoga and Dewa Nyoman Sukrawan, avoiding any news about their opponents or only publishing highly critical news about the current governor and his running mate.

Bali TV, owned by the Bali Post Media Group, has been documented running logos in the corner of their news broadcasts with the slogan “15 May 2013, Replace the Governor.”

Bali Post Reports

The Bali Post coverage of the protests  that a group of "tattooed" protestors wearing traditional clothing gathering in front of their offices on Friday, May 3, 2103.

The paper said that in anticipation of trouble, strong security measures had been introduced since early morning supported by police from the Denpasar police precinct, Bali police headquarters, the police mobile brigade (Brimob) and uniformed members of the armed forces.

The Bali Post reportage of the protests depicted the protests as an effort to pressure the press in its rightful function of social control. The paper quoted a retired Major General IGK Manila who said: “This action is meant to pressure the press. They should be focusing on dialogue, not in mass demonstrations.”

Manila said that when there are parties that are unhappy with press coverage, those individuals should use the mechanisms in place to seek clarification exercise their right of a response or bring the matter directly to the Press Council as the government agency empowered to address problems surrounding the press.

The retired Major General who once served as a Secretary General at the Ministry of Information, suggested the demonstrators were using their protests in favor of a fair press for political means, an act he considered unfair.

The protestors stood before the Bali Post Media Office and read a number of demands and pronouncements, including:
  • They supported the statement issued by the Indonesian Broadcast Commission (KPI) instructing Bali TV to stop broadcasting provocative advertisements in connection with the election.
  • They urged the people of Bali not to be provoked by media reports and remain united in their commitment to have peaceful elections.
  • Urged that press reports return to the true “spirit of the press” and support accuracy and objectivity in keeping with commemoration of the International Press Day.
After reading their statement the protestors applauded and shouted “long-live Pastika-Kerta” and then proceeded to burn several copies of The Bali Post.

The Bali Post reports that the Chief Editor of The Bali Post, Nyoman Wirata, and members of the editorial team of Bali Post Media Group received the delegation from the Bali Alliance for a Fair Press.

Thanking the protestors for their input, all were invited to work together with the Bali Post to ensure peaceful elections.

There were also press reports of demonstrations against The Bali Post held in North Bali on the same date. 


Middle Kingdom Branch in Bali
PRC Preparing to Open a Consulate General in Bali

Tempo reports that the People’s Republic of China plans to open a Consulate eneral in Bali.

This was confirmed by the Foreign Minister of China, Wany Yi, to Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa during a bilateral meeting held in Jakarta on May 2, 2013.

During that meeting several bilateral agreements were signed in the area of security, trade, investment, infrastructure, food security, energy and oceanic affairs.

Natalegawa told the press, ‘Indonesia is open and supports the desire of the Chinese to open a consulate general in Bali.”

618,223 PRC citizen visited Indonesia in 2012, increasing substantially from the 504,749 who visited in 2011.

Shown on Balidiscovery.com is Marty Natalegawa, Foreign Minister for the Republic of Indonesia.



Marching to a Different Drummer
Bali by the Numbers: Bali Foreign Tourist Arrivals Q1 2013 Continue to Slow.

Bali Foreign Arrivals ending March 2013 were only 3.58% above Q1 2012 demonstrating, once again, that after years of steady and dramatic growth, Bali arrivals are beginning to level off.

March 2013 arrivals totaled 245,311 – 7.8% more than the 227,475 foreign tourists who visited in March 2012.

If the current 3.58% growth rate holds through the end of the year, total arrivals for Bali will end the year at something less than 3 million foreign arrivals.

Arrivals from Key Markets

Australia – Australian arrivals declined month-on-month by 8.2% with 58.991 Visitors from Down Under in March 2013. On a cumulative basis through the end of Q1 2013, Australian visitors to Bali are down 4.02%. While Australians continue to travel abroad in record numbers, Bali is losing some of its appeal for holidaymakers.

People’s Republic of China – March arrivals from the PRC improved 12.7% in March with 22,961 Mainland Chinese holidaymakers finding their way to Bali. Year-on-year through the end of Q1 Chinese visitors are, however, down 4.17%.

Japan – Japan continues to stage a comeback with March arrivals up a whopping 31.5% at 18,348. On a cumulative basis Japanese visitors are up 16.48%. If the Japanese maintain this rate of growth through the end of 2013, nearly a quarter-million Japanese will visit Bali during the current year- equaling Japanese visitor totals last achieved in 2009-2010.

Malaysia – Cheap flights and low cost hotels helped Malaysian visitors through the end of Q1 2013 grow 9.03%. Month-on-month Malaysian tourist visitors to Bali are up 9%.

South Korean – Political strife on the Korean peninsula and a troubled economy saw South Korean visitors to Bali decline1.88% through the end of Q1 2013. March visitors from South Korean did, however, improve 4% with 9.516 South Koreans coming to Bali in March 2013.

Taiwan – Taiwan may be staging a comeback. March arrivals at 10,212 were up 32% when compared to March 2012. Cumulatively through the end of March 2013, Taiwanese arrivals are up 2.82%.

Russia –Russian arrivals for March 2013 hit 9.096 – an improvement of 2.3% over the same month in 2012. Ending Q1 2013, Russian cumulative arrivals are down a slight 1.41%.

Singapore – Singapore arrivals are surging, up 8.2% through the end of March 2013. March 2013 arrivals at 11,703 were 18% ahead of March 2012.

U.K. – As Garuda prepares to return to London, U.K. arrivals to Bali continue to fail. Month-on-month arrivals in March from the U.K. were down 2.5% at 9,088. On a cumulative basis through the end of March, U.K. arrivals to Bali are down 12.64%.

U.S.A. –U.S. arrivals to Bali are robust. Through the end of March 2013 U.S. visitors are up 12.16%. March arrivals at 9,150 are 8.5% ahead of the same month in 2012.

Germany – German arrivals to Bali increased for March by 12.6% with 7,909 visitors. Through the end of Q1 German visitors to Bali are up a very strong 22.17%.

France – French visitors at 6,676 in March 2013 declined 3.6% when compared to March 2012. Through the end of the first three months of 2013, French arrivals are up 3.57%.

India – India is fast becoming a player in Bali tourist arrivals. India is now the 13th biggest source of visitors. Indian visitors in March totaled 4,632 in March 2013, increasing 21% over March 2012. Ending Q1 2013 Indian arrivals are up 29.31%

The Netherlands – Dutch arrivals declined 10.4% in March 2013 with 3,973 visitors. Through the end of March 2013, Dutch visitors to Bali are down 7.97% as compared to Q1 2012.


No Parking in the Red Zone
State Prosecutors Preparing a Major Corruption Case Involving Parking Concession at Baliís Airport

The Attorney General’s office has interviewed 23 witnesses in connection with suspected corruption and malfeasance in the management of parking at Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

As reported by the State News Agency Antara, State Prosecutors suspect that Rp. 20 billion (US$2 million) may have been lost to the State through illegal acts in connection with parking fees collected from the thousands of vehicles that pass through the airport each day.

The head of the information office at the State Prosecutor’s office, Setia Untung Arimuladi, announced via a press release issued in Jakarta on Friday, May 3, 2013, that 23 items had been seized as evidence comprising letters, documents, office buildings and private residences.

“This includes plots of land covered in seven freehold land certificates, located on Jalan Raya By Pass Ngurah Rai, Perenenan and Tabanan with an estimated value of Rp. 15.1 billion,” explained Arimuladi.

Investigations in connection with the Bali airport’s parking operations by State Prosecutors have been underway since last year.

Four suspects have been named:
  • “MBA” the CEO of PT. Penata Sarana Bali (PT PSB)
  • “IB” the general manager of PT PSB
  • “MM” the operational manager of PT PSB
  • “RJS” the Administrative staff of PT PSB.
The four are being charged with criminal corruption in connection with their management of the public parking areas at Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

The parking concession was operated on a profit sharing basis with PT Angkasa Pura I – the State-owned company appointed to manage the airport.

PT PSB is accused with manipulating the computerized parking system between October 2008 and December 2011 resulting in losses to the State of Rp. 20.8 billion.


Lv8 Resort Assembles a Management Team
Jeffrey Wibisono Assumes New Sales and Marketing Role at the new Lv8 Resort Hotel in Canggu, Bali

Jeffrey Wibisono has accepted a new assignment as corporate director of sales & marketing at the Lv8 Resort Hotel in Berawa, Canggu Beach, Bali.

His last position was as regional director of sales at the Bali Sales & Marketing Office of Swiss-Belhotel International, a post he held for two years.

Previous assignments include a stint as the general manager of Sanuka Leisure Management, general manager of Villa Mahapala in Sanur and various sales and marketing roles at major hotels in Bali, Semarang and Jakarta.

Lv8 Resort Hotel

Opening in May 2013, Lv8 Resort Hotel is a 124-all suite property located on Berawa Beach on Canggu Beach. Originally a private estate, Lv8 has been transformed by an international design team of architects, designers and operators.


Changes in the Top Ranks at Nusa Dua
Jason Leung and Sally Fadjrina Earn Promotions at Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali.

The Westin Resort Nusa Dua, Bali has announced two key promotions at their Five-Star Resort property at Nusa Dua.

Jason Leung

Jason Leung , an Australian national, has worked as director of sales and marketing for the Resort for the past three years during which he spent the last 12 month overseeing the renovation of the Bali International Convention Center, has been appointed to the role of hotel manager.

adjrina

Meanwhile, Sally Fadjrina, who has spent the past six years working in sales and marketing for the Resort and the Bali International Convention Center, has been promoted to the role of senior director of sales.

Sally will continue to oversee her current wholesale market along with expanding her experience to the MICE market in her new role as senior director of sales.


Keeping it Simple
Government Cuts a Hasty Retreat on Plans for Two-Tiered Price Increase for Gasoline. Expect Higher Gas Prices in May

Suara Pembaruan reports that the government is cutting a hasty retreat from plans to introduce a two-tiered price structure this May at gasoline pumps, changing their original plans to estalish lower prices for motorcycles and higher prices for four-wheeled vehicles.

The price hike is sought by the government in an effort to reduce the massive subsidy presently being absorbed by the State budget.

After the two-tiered pricing approach was widely criticized from many quarters of Indonesian society, the Government has reportedly decided to soon announce a single price for premium gas at the petro pumps.

The price, yet to be confirmed, will probably be a figure less than Rp. 6,500 (US$0.65) per liter to be charged to all vehicles for premium gasoline.
Jero Wacik, Indonesia’s Minister of Energy and Mineral Resources, said: “The possibility is that there will be a single price in accordance with the people’s wishes, perhaps a price below Rp. 6,500 per liter.”

Wacik said the government must raise the price of gasoline to reduce the burden of the fuel subsidy, but asked the public for time to properly consider the final decision.

Continuing, Wacik said: “The Government has listened to the opinions of the people. The public knew there were two levels of pricing being considered for the the price of fuel. Many of the public told us it would be difficult (to have two prices). We (the government) would also face difficulties. We considered all these opinions.”

Separately, the Coordinating Minister for the Economy, Hatta Rajasa, told the press that the Government is still studying introducing a single price increase for gasoline. Said Hatta: “We are studying one price (for gasoline). Actually, two-tiered pricing is the best solution, but operationally that would be very difficult.”

Many gas station operators in Indonesia have asked the government to use a single price system.


Pier Pressure
Karangasem Lawmakers Call on Regent to Bring East Bali Tanah Ampo Cruise Port Up to Operating Standard

The Karangasem House of Representatives (DPRD-Karangasem) is calling on their regent to find a solution to make the Tanah Ampo International Cruise Terminal operational.

The poorly conceived and under-constructed pier and supporting shore facilities remain largely unused as passenger ships, wary of the poor reputation enjoyed by the facilities at Tanah Ampo have diverted to Benoa Harbor in South Bali.

As reported by The Bali Post, local fishermen now use a pier that was intended to welcome international cruise passengers.

The chairman of the DPRD-Karangasem, Gede Dana, launched his call for a solution to make Tanah Ampo a viable cruise port on Friday, May 3, 2013.

Dana’s pronouncement echoes a similar one made by legislators when the Regent of Karangasem delivered his report of the region's budget in 2012.

Another member of the DPRD-Karangasem, Nyoman Sadra, said the port was built six years ago, but is yet to function, with cruise ships unable or unwilling to bring their passengers to the port.

Sadra said that several trial operations have taken place at Tanah Ampo in which ships anchored off shore had used their tenders to bring passengers to the new pier. This method, however, is unpopular give the advanced age of many cruise passengers and the poorly constructed transitional pontoon built by the regency.

Sadra complained that the Tanah Ampo Port's state of suspended-animation was also affecting local traders who had hoped to sell handicrafts to from the Manggis traditional art market. Sadra complained: “The cruise passenger port isn’t functioning, so how can the traditional market operate? I had heard of plans to establish a traditional market, but up till now there’s been no change. The art mark is now overgrown. Part of the roof at the market has caved in, but nobody cares.”

Sadra warned that if the cruise pier were left in its current state it would eventually fall into decay. On at least two occasions a transitional pontoon has been constructed at the pier, but they have failed and been destroyed by the waves. The large amounts of money spent on the port, he lamented, have been wasted.

The money spent on the Tanah Ampo International Cruise Project is estimated to be more than Rp. 100 billion (US$10 million). The large passenger terminal remains unused. The entrance gates, made of steel, are now rusted and broken.

Sadra added: "The Regent should complete this program in order that it can operate in a maximum manner. This must become a priority.

In response, the Regent of Karangasem, I Wayan Geredeg, said that in the beginning (of the project) it was difficult to manage the project controlled from Jakarta. Now, however, the situation in clear because the President has ordered his Ministers to complete the project.

Geredeg did not commit on when the cruise terminal would be operational. Still unclear, also, is who will have managerial responsibility for the port.

Related Links

[A Pier Over Troubled Waters]

[Minta Ampun! Tanah Ampo!]

[Ship to Shore]

[No Parking on the Paddocks]

[Port Out, Starboard Home]

[Editorial: Beware of Rank Amateurs]

[Missing the Boat; Missing the Point]

[Who’s in Charge?]

[Blaming Mother Nature]

[Tanah Ampo: Not Ready for Royalty]

[What’s Up, Dock?]

[Cruise Ship Services in Bali]


A Tourism Cycle
Bali Capital of Denpasar Promises to Expand and Improve Bicycle Lane Network

The Bali Daily (Jakarta Post) reports Denpasar’s Bicycle Paths are slated for revitalization, having fallen into decline since they were first launched with much fanfare in 2010.

Promoted as a way of reducing both traffic congestion and pollution, a 16.4-kilometer stretch of curbside bike paths were originally marked with painted lines and identified with suitable signage. In the intervening three years plans to expand the network were feared to have been largely forgotten and the bike paths are now blocked by parked cars and motorcycles.

Denpasar Transportation Agency’s traffic division head, Nyoman Sustiawan, said that hope still remains that the bike lane network will be revitalized and expanded, saying: 

“There has not been any maintenance budget for the bike lanes in the past few years. However, this year, we expect to get some Rp 100-200 million (US$10,250-$20,500) from the revised provincial budget. The sum will be used for maintenance of the fading lanes and maybe extending the lanes to a length of some 20 km.”
Plans are to add lanes in areas surrounding schools, tourist area, markets and shopping areas of the city. Lanes are planned along Jl. Gunung Agung, Jl. Teuku Umar and Jl. Imam Bonjol.

Sustiawan explained how efforts to expand bike paths in Denpasar were complicated by factors of limitation of space on already congested streets. “We are unable to enforce regulations that ban on-street parking, because we receive little backup from the traffic police,” he said.

“Most walkways (sidewalks) also end up as parking space, anyway,” he lamented. Citing examples, he pointed to Jl. Gajah Mada and Jl. Kamboja – two streets that have wide sidewalks that are now used instead for off-street parking.

Bali is largely an unfriendly destination for pedestrians with a low level of “walkability” in the man downtown areas of the city. City officials in Bali cite Pattaya in Thailand as an example where good governance can make a real difference by banning traffic in certain areas and providing viable public transport alternatives.


Beggarsí Banquet
Baliís Capital of Denpasar Studying from Banjarmasin, Kalimantan on How to Reduce Street Beggars and Vagrants

The State News Agency Antara reports that officials from Bali’s capital city of Denpasar are studying strategies and tactics used to reduce street beggars and vagrants practiced in the South Kalimantan city of Banjarmasin.

A Denpasar municipal official, Ketut Mister, said on Saturday, May 4, 2013, during a visit to Banjarmasin: “The problem of managing beggars (in Banjarmasin) is not much different with what we experience (in Bali). Today the mode of operations of beggars has changed; they use coordinators.”

According to Mister, local regulations to prevent, deter, capture and educate beggars, while persuading the public not to hand money out to street urchins has done little to actually reduce the number of beggars on Bali’s streets.

And, while Banjarmasin faces much the same situation as Bali, that South Kalimantan community has been more successful in keeping beggars off their streets by introducing a series of “halfway” houses where beggars and street urchins apprehended by the police must spend a period of "training" before being returned to their home cities.

Miter admitted that Denpasar does not yet have halfway houses for beggars and street urchins due to a lack of available land to accommodate the construction of such facilitates.

A Banjarmasin city official, Rusdiansyah, told the visiting Denpasar officials that substantial funds are needed to handle the problems of beggars and street urchins.

“We have a half-way house where the beggars are placed (before returning home) to act as a deterrent and as a place of training. But his requires funding for consumables and our budget is limited,” explained Rusdiansyah.

Agus Surono, the head of Social Services for Banjarmasin said the halfway houses are also used for housing the mentally ill. “At this time, our halfway house has 29 mentally ill people in residence,” said Surono.

Both Banjarmasin and Denpasar say that the majority of beggars and street urchins originate from areas outside the city in which they operate, with many hailing from areas outside the province.
 


Hope Deferred
Hope for Life Fun Run and Bike Tour Postponed Until Sunday, May 26, 2013

Due to unforeseen circumstance and venue conflicts with a last minute political rally, the Hope for Life Event - a 15 kilometer fun bike ride or a 5 kilometer fun walk organized by Four Seasons Resorts - Bali to raise funds for the war against cancer – has been postponed from its originally scheduled date of Sunday, May 5 to a new date of Sunday, May 26, 2013.

The organizers regret any inconvenience caused by this late change and looks forward to welcoming even more participants on May 26th.

The event is part of a three-decade legacy of community outreach first started by the Four Seasons Resorts in the early 1980s under the banner of Terry Fox Runs, the Hope for Life Event is open to all who want to participate in a 15 kilometer fun bike ride or a 5 kilometer fun walk starting at 7:00 am in Renon.

Cost of participation is Rp 75,000 (US$7.50) per person that covers the entry, a t-shirt, refreshment and a celebratory party.

Related Links

[Email to Order Tickets

[Challenge Cancer by Remembering Dayu Ratih]

[Raising Funds for Cancer Care and Treatment in Bali]  


Here Goes the Sun
Bali and Most of Indonesia to Experience Solar Eclipse on Friday, May 10, 2013

The Indonesian Meteorological, Climate and Geophysical Agency (BKMG) has projected that the solar eclipse will take place May 9-10, (UTC) 2013 will pass over much of the central and eastern parts of Indonesia.

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between the Earth and Sun, partially or totally obscuring the Sun. Annular eclipses cause the sun to appear as a ring (annulus) around the sun.

The length of the phenomenon is dependent on one’s distance from the canter of the eclipse’s track that will pass over Australia and portions of the South Pacific. At the center, the duration of the event will be 6 minutes and 3 seconds.

The event will be seen in most parts of Indonesia (except North Sumatra) and visible during the early morning hours of Friday, May 10, 2013.

The eclipse will also be visible from Bali.

NASA provides the following timings.
  • Penumbral Eclipse Begins: 18:03:38 UT (May 9th)
  • Partial Eclipse Begins: 19:54:08 UT (May 9th)
  • Greatest Eclipse: 20:07:30 UT (May 9th)
  • Partial Eclipse Ends: 20:21:02 UT (May 9th)
  • Penumbral Eclipse Ends: 22:11:26 UT (May 9th)
Bali Time is UTC + 8 Hours which means the chain of timing for the eclipse will commence from the early morning hours of May 10th in Bali, Indonesia.


 
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June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006
 

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