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Sanur Raya No. 27
Jl. By Pass Ngurah Rai,
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Bali News by Bali Update
BALI UPDATE #950 - 17 November 2014

IN THIS UPDATE


Sent Off The Field
Soccer Enthusiast Stages One-Man Protest at Bali APEC Conference

Security officials safeguarding the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference (APEC) in Bali took into custody the chairman of the People of Indonesia Soccer Association (MSBI), Sarman El-Hakim, who attempted to disrupt the arrivals of Russian President Vladimir Putin by staging a banner protest at a busy South Bali intersection near Nusa Dua.

On Monday, October 7, 2013, at approximately 12:30 pm, Sarman unfurled a banner while standing in the middle of the  intersection before the entrance to Nusa Dua proclaiming “FIFA World Cup in Indonesia 2022.”

As reported by DenPost, the protest took place just minutes before President Putin’s motorcade was set to pass through the intersection. Sarman managed evade detection by police and the local citizen constabulary (pacalang) by slipping through a phalanx of grade school children waving flags to welcome visiting world dealers and then opened his banner urging the FIFA tournament be held in Bali in nine years time.

As soon as Sarman occupied the intersection both he and his banner were quickly taken into custody. Resisting officers, Sarman screamed: “What have I done? I have brought a banner supporting Indonesia as the host of the World Cup? I haven’t brought a political party banner.”

Sarman took the opportunity to complain to the listening press that the APEC Conference is focused only on bringing investors to Indonesia, while the World Cup, he insists, would bring million of tourists spending their money in Indonesia. He continued, accusing investors lured by APEC of imposing pre-conditions on Indonesia, he said sports fans bring their money without levying demands on the Country.

Following Sarman’s arrest, calm was quickly restored at the entrance to Nusa Dua as the Sarman was escorted to a nearby police station. Putin was reportedly unaware of the incident when his car passed by a short time later.

The head of the South Kuta police precinct, I Wayan Nuriata, confirmed that Sarman was undergoing interrogation by police. “We have only taken him into custody. He was still being questioned by officers of from the legal section (Bidkum) of the Bali Police,” explained Nuriata.

The 22nd FIFA World Cup will be staged in Qatar in 2022.

Picture shown on Balidiscovery.com from DenPost showing Sarman El-Hakin being escorted away by police for interrogation.


This Song is for You
Indonesian President Serenades Russian President Putin

During the just-completed Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference (APEC) in Bali, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono managed to grab a guitar and serenade Russian President Vladimir Putin on his 61st birthday.
the musical tribute from the Indonesian President who has several musical CDs to his credit, Putin expressed his surprise and thanked Yudhoyono during the impromptu celebration on Monday, October 7, 2013.

Strumming a guitar, President Yudhoyono invited the world leaders gathered at APEC to join him in singing “Happy Birthday” for Putin. The Indonesian President said: “I received the report from intelligence late. As soon as you landed, I began searching for a guitar so I could sing ‘Happy Birthday.’”

Quoted by Beritabali.com, Yudhoyono explained how the APEC Conference in Bali was a continuance of the last APEC Conference held in Vladivostok, Russia in 2012. The Indonesian President expressed the hope that relationships between the participating nations would continue to grow and be strengthened in the year to come.


Tourism: A Power for Good or Evil?
Bali has Failed to Manage Tourism Development for the Benefit of the Balinese

An article in the Bali Daily (The Jakarta Post) underlines that among the “lessons learned” by Bali over the past decades is that tourism development has an equal propensity for bringing both benefit or calamity to a destination.

The article “Bali’s tourism, not all dazzling stories” urges other areas of Indonesia to consider carefully in formulating their tourism plans. Quoting an economic affairs official from the Bali provincial administration, Ketut Wija said a number of negative cultural, social and environmental impacts have resulted from Bali’s rapid rate of tourism investment. “Any province must have a strong commitment to preserving its culture and nature, as well as the enactment of relevant legal requirements before planning tourism development in their area,” Wija warned.

Speaking at a training session for journalists on banking and economic issues, Wija bemoaned the fact that most tourist facilities in Bali are owned by foreigners and non-Balinese from other parts of Indonesia.

The rapid rise in accommodation development has also created more employment opportunities, but not necessarily for the Balinese who continue to suffer from a high rate of unemployment.

The real estate boom in Bali is also marginalizing the Balinese who are no longer able to purchase land on their ancestral island. Moreover, those Balinese who still own land are increasingly being compelled to sell their property due to a rapid increase in property tax rates that they can no longer afford.

He also cited how development and traditional religious practice are often finding themselves at loggerheads with each other. Long religious processions cause traffic jams on roads crowded with tourists and newcomers. At the same time, developers intent on creating “illegal” private beachfronts are thwarting access to shorelines once used for religious rituals. “For Balinese people, beaches are sacred sites for them to spiritually cleanse their body and soul. With so many new buildings, access to beaches is closed and restricted for residents,” Wija said.

He also pointed out development has cost Bali 1,000 hectares of productive farm land annually in years past, a figure now down to an average of 350 hectares per year.

And, while tourism has brought wealth and prosperity to Bali, Wija warns: “The distribution of wealth and development is far from equal. Only a few people living in tourist destinations benefit most from tourism.”

Underlining his point, Wija said unemployment in Bali stood at 2.4% and nearly 4% of the people in Bali still live below the poverty line.

He explained how Indonesia's policy on regional autonomy has largely been a disaster in Bali, with each regency making its own rules and regulations, oftentimes to suit the whims of new investors.

Finally, he warned that the mistakes made in Bali are now being repeated in other parts of Indonesia. “The case of Bali is now being replicated in some other places, such as Labuan Bajo and Komodo Island in East Nusa Tenggara. Investors have already acquired strategic land along coastal areas,” lamented Wija.


Bali in a Stupor
Bali Drug Enforcement Expert Confirms Island is Now a Target for International Drug Traffickers

Despite major arrests and drug busts, the scourge of narcotic abuse in Bali continues to grow largely unabated. Bali has become a favored target for the operations of international drug syndicates.

As reported by DenPost, in 2011, the estimated number of active narcotics users on the Island was put at 63,734.

The Head of the Badung Regency office of the National Narcotics Enforcement Agency (BNN-Badung), I Gusti Suryasa, said on Wednesday, October 9, 2013: “The more tourists that come to Bali impacts the increase of drugs in circulation. What’s more, there are tourists that come to Bali as narcotics couriers. Everything has its good and bad side, including tourism in Bali.”

Research by BNN and the University of Indonesia estimated 63,734 narcotics abusers in Bali in 2011.

That study said illegal drug use was centered in the Kuta area of Bali. Suyasa said drug use is linked to the many activities and housing options catering to foreigners in that region.

Continuing, Suyasa said: “The appearance of a Columbian-Bali connection and other drug syndicates serve as proof that Bali has become a target for international narcotic traffickers. Cocaine and heroin is the preference of foreigners, while locals prefer methamphetamines. At the same time, there is intense competition by domestic drug networks eager to establish networks in Bali.”

Suyasa, who once headed the narcotics division of the Bali Police, explained that while in the past Bali only served as a transit point for drugs destined for Australia. Now, however, Bali has become an important and sought after distribution point for the international drug trade. “They (the drug syndicates) will undertake a number of efforts to widen their ‘black’ business in Bali. If not handled and anticipated, our coming generation will be under threat. This is the job of BNN: to suppress the distribution of drugs in the Badung Regency,” he said.

Referring to the BNN Program of “Drug Free Indonesia in 2015,” Suyasa said the goal cannot be “zero drugs” but, rather, the suppression of narcotics use. This is being done by urine tests at government agencies and schools, and creating anti-drug groups and drug-free zones. “Zero drugs are an impossibility. Our job is the save the coming generation from the threat of narcotics,” said Suyasa.

The head of BNN-Badung urged the public to be wise in their personal struggles against narcotics. He also said members of society must be aware of those who associate with other members of their family. Suyasa added the warning: “I once dealt with a family whose children had become addicts. The children could not be rehabilitated and the (family) company’s wealth was depleted. The kids died in the end. This is the danger of narcotics abuse.”

Suyasa said BNN is working to rehabilitate narcotic users. In his view, punishment does little to deter narcotics use and, in many cases, only adds to the problem. Putting narcotics users behind bars with other narcotic users only helps to widen distribution networks.

“BNN has prepared rehabilitation centers for drug users available without cost. There are fixed criteria to be allowed to join a rehabilitation program,” said Suyasa.


Getting Your Kicks in Bali
Bali Hosts International Muay Thai Tournament October 21-28, 2013

Bali will host an International Muay Thai Tournament October 21-28, 2013, with fighters from 10 nations participating.

Speaking to the State News Agency Antara, Made Nariana, the chairman of the Indonesia Muay Thai Association in Bali, said, “The 2013 Muay Thai Championship will be for the President’s Trophy.”

The operational manager for the Indonesian Muay Thai Association, Sudirman, confirmed that Muay Thai fighters from around the world are preparing to fly to Bali.

As of October 6th, 17 athletes have registered to participate in the tournament; a number Sudirman expects to grow up until the championships gets underway.

Registration closes on October 20, 2013.

The Indonesian Muay Thai fighters are expected to use the Bali championship as a warm-up for the SEA Games to be held in Myanmar at the end of this year.

Governor Made Mangku Pastika is expected to host the visiting fighters to a dinner. Pastika also serve as the chairman of the Muay Thai Association for Indonesia.


Making Life Less Taxing
New VAT Tax Refund Kiosk Inaugurated at Bali Ngurah Rai International Airport

Through the end of September 2013, the government has refunded Rp. 585,580,243 in value added tax refunds via the VAT Refund Locket in operation at Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

That amount has been spread across 535 foreign visitors applying for the refund of the 10% VAT tax paid at selected retail outlets in Bali.

The head of the Bali Tax Office, Arif Yanuar, told Bisnis Bali on Thursday, October 10, 2013: “The execution of the VAT refund using a web-based service at the Ngurah Rai Bali Airport is increasingly efficient. There have been 535 applicants receiving a total of Rp. 585 million in refunds.”

The new web-based refund procedure has reduced the processing, achieving significant improvements on a VAT Refund Scheme first introduced in April 2010.

On Friday, October 4, 2013 the Indonesian Minister of Finance Chatib Basri inaugurated two tax facilities at Bali’s renovated airport. The VAT refund kiosk is a pilot project of the Indonesian government intended to encourage higher spending levels among tourist visitors and induce more people to visit Indonesia.

The Director General of Tax, Faud Rahmany, told the press that the VAT Refund for Tourist System was being extended in keeping with the standards and competitive practice in operation at other international destinations.

Tourist making claims for refunds of the 10% VAT for sums less than Rp. 5 million (US$435) can receive an instant cash refund. Refunds in excess of that amount are done via a transfer to the foreign travelers bank account.

The VAT Tax Refund for Tourist program is now in place at five Indonesian airports: Soekarno-Hatta in Jakarta; Ngurah Rai in Bali; Adi Sutjipto in Yogyakarta; Juanda in Surabaya; and Kuala Namu in Medan.


Welcome to Bali’s Gulag
Two Russian Men Sent to Prison for Four and Five Years for Possession of Marijuana

Two Russian Tourists undergoing separate trials in Bali for possession of marijuana have been sent to prison for periods of 4 and 5 years.

Revaz Tolordava (28) was sentenced to 4 years in prison while Anton Pudikov (32) to 5 years on Thursday, October 10, 2013.

The two panels of judges hearing the cases agreed with prosecutors’ by declaring both men guilty of possession marijuana.

The men were also told to pay a fine of Rp. 800 million (US$69,500) each for their crimes or face an additional one month prison on their sentences.

Tolordava’s sentence was equal to that demanded by prosecutors, while Pudikov’s sentence was one year less than the 6 years sought by the State’s attorneys. The fine imposed on both men matched that sought by prosecutors, but time to be served in lieu of payment reduced from 3 months to only 1 month.

Revaz was arrested after police found marijuana in the baggage compartment of his motorcycle and at his residence on Gang Carik in Kerobokan. The drugs found at both locations totaled 72.56 grams.

Pudikov was arrested separately at him home in the Jimbaran Asri Complex with 83.52 grams of marijuana.

Radar Bali reports that both men were displeased with the sentence of the court and demanded their lawyer appeal the court’s decision. The lawyer tried to appease the two men, saying the sentences were in accordance with sentencing minimums demanded under Indonesian law.

Should the two men pursue an unsuccessful appeal they will also face the possibility that the appeals court may see fit to add more time to their original sentence.


The Great Gatsby in Bali
Great Gatsby Night at the AYANA Resort and Spa in Bali on November 30, 2013 in Support of Bali WISE


It’s 1922 again!

It’s time to celebrate the “roaring 20s” and party like there’s no tomorrow.

Inspired by the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel of the same name, the AYANA Resort and Spa, Bali will host a Great Gatsby Charity Night on Saturday, November 30, 2013 at the world-famous Rock Bar.

Organized in aid to Bali WISE’s programs in support of the education and advancement of indigent women in Bali, this special fund-raising night is strictly limited to 140 participants who will enjoy a 4-course dinner followed the fun and gaiety of an after dinner party.

The evening is dedicated to honoring the women of Bali WISE graduating from job and life skills program conducted over the past weeks at the AYANA Resort.

During the evening those in attendance will be entertained with live music, and both silent and live auctions. Among the items offered to the highest bidder will be fabulous artworks; fine local textiles; an award-winning chef-hosted dinner for 10; and accommodation packages offered by AYANA’s Cliff Villas, the new sister hotel RIMBA Jimbaran Bali, Capella Singapore and Alila Resorts.

In keeping with the Great Gatsby theme, look forward to classic roaring 20s cocktails, Cuban cigars and other indulgences emblematic of the golden era when folks danced the Black Bottom, the Charleston, the Shimmy and the Lindy Hop.

Bali Update’s Editor, Jack Daniels, will serve as master of ceremonies for the evening.

Only 140 tickets are available at a cost of Rp. 850,000 (US$74) each covering the evening’s entertainment and the four-course dinner.

The fun starts at 7:00 pm on Saturday, November 30, 2013 at the AYANA Resort and Spa Bali.

Email for tickets and information or telephone ++62-(0)361-702222 (extension 40).

Bali WISE Website 


Bali in a Golden Age
Miguel Covarrubias and Bali at Museum Pasifika Through December 15, 2013

t APEC Conference in Bali, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto officially opened an exhibition at the Museum Pasifika in Nusa Dua dedicated to Mexican artists and anthropologist Miguel Covarrubias who lived and worked in Bali in the early 1930s.
bition runs until December 15, 2013.

A self-style anthropologist and talented artist, Covarrubias' work has stood the test of time, remaining evergreen while the works of his Bali contemporaries, such as Margaret Mead, have failed to stand the same test of time.

Still in print seven decades after its publication in 1937, Covarrubias’ “Island of Bali” remains an outstanding compendium on Balinese art and culture, in many ways as fresh and informative today as it was when it was written 75 years ago.

Miguel Covarrubias was a fashionable member of New York society in the 1930s, working as a cartoonist for Vanity Fair. Honeymooning in Bali in 1930, Covarrubias was smitten by the island and resolved with his filmmaker wife, Rose, to return to Bali for an extended period of study and admiration.

That second trip, a short time later, resulted in films and laid the groundwork leading to his landmark book on Bali published later in the decade - Island of Bali.

After the book's publication, Covarrubias was commissioned to produce six large murals that were exhibited in the San Francisco World’s Fair of 1939-1940.

A multi-talented man who died too young at aged 53 in 1957, Covarrubias was a cartoonist, ethnologist, artist and even directed a ballet during his artistically consuming but short lifetime.

The current exhibition “Miguel Covarrubias Y Bali” (Miguel Covarrubias and Bali) runs through December 15 at the Museum Pasifika in Nusa Dua and features 115 drawings, painting and photographs demonstrating the remarkable range of this remarkable Mexican.

The Museum Pasifika also has a regular collection of more than 600 artworks by more than 200 artists form 25 countries.

Museum Pasifika
Complex Bali Tourism Development Corporation (BTDC)
Block P
Nusa Dua 80363, Bali
Telephone: +62-(0)361774935


Busy Island, Empty Hotels
Many Hotels and Bali Business Suffered Business Downturns During APEC Conference

The Jakarta Post reports that many hotels outside the Nusa Dua Area, where the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference (APEC) was held October 1-8, 2013, suffered significant declines in occupancy during the 4 days of the conference when Bali's airport was closed for extended periods to accommodate the movements of heads of state attending the Summit.

Confirming hotel average occupancy rates averaged only 35% during the APEC Conference, Tjokorda Oka Artha Ardana Sukawati, chairman of the Indonesian Hotels and Restaurants Association (PHRI) said: “We usually experience an average occupancy rate of 75 percent in October. But now the rate has dropped to only 35 percent.”

Problems of low occupancy were aggravated by many last minute cancellations and alterations to flight schedules. Other tourists, fearing traffic congestion and delays caused by heavy security measures in place for the APEC Conference, cancelled or postponed their travel to Bali.

Acknowledging that APEC has been a economic windfall for the conference hotels and venues, Sukawati, who is also chairman of the Bali Tourism Promotion Board (BPPD), added: “But the other hotels around Bali do not enjoy such good business. However, we do understand that this is only a temporary situation. The situation will be back to normal after the meeting ends.”

Sukawati said the overall impact of the conference would be positive for Bali tourism and, because of that, the conference deserved and enjoyed the support of the Island’s tourism industry. “This will be a good promotion for Bali’s tourism,” he said.

 Adding, “The summit will significantly boost our island’s brand as an international tourist destination.”

Jeffrey Wibisono, a director of sales and marketing for LV8 Resort Hotel, said his luxury hotel in the Canggu area of Bali saw occupancy drop to 15% during the APEC Conference, expecting business to climb back to 80% once the situation on the Island returns to normal. Said Wibisono: 

“The significant drop in our hotel occupancy is just because of the airport closure during the summit. After the summit, we will be facing high occupancy. Our guests have decided to come to Bali after the summit.”

A number of hotels in Kuta confirmed heavy cancellations connected to APEC.

As reported by Balidiscovery.com, restaurants in and around Nusa Dua where the APEC Conference was headquartered, reported that despite the fact that all hotels in their area running 100% business was quiet as transient traffic was banned in the area and those staying in nearby hotels already had a full schedules of meetings and evening entertainments.

Bali’s modern BIMC Hospital within Nusa Dua also suffered a downturn in business during APEC. Despite being designated as the main medical provider for VVIP visitors and their delegations, a member of BIMC’s management said that during the conference members of the public needing medical assistance were not allowed access to the hospital. Saying business was “almost zero” during the Summit, the BIMC officials said the conference had cost them a "fortune in lost revenues" and questioned the unknown toll in suffering and lost lives occasioned by the inability of community members to access their hospital.

Related Links

Setting a Table for APEC


Bali’s Empty Buses
Bali Trans-Sarbagita Bus System's Low Fares Failing to Attract Passengers

Now into its third year of operation, Bali’s Trans Sarbagita Integrated Bus System only averages a 30% load factor or about 2,500 passengers a day.

As reported by Bali Daily (The Jakarta Post), I.B. Made Parsa, the coordinator of Trans Sarbagita says that 70% of those who ride the busses are comprised of students. “Last year, the load factor reached 2,800 persons per day, because the services were free of charge,” Parsa said. 



However, during the first half of 2013, the average number of passengers taking the bus reached only 2,300 per day. Adding: “During the APEC Summit, the number of passengers has dropped drastically as buses and public transportation were banned from entering the venue area in Nusa Dua.”

Sarbagita derives it names from the areas intended to be served by the public bus system: DenpaSAR, BAdung, GIanyar and TAbanan.

Launched in 2011 as a measure to reduce traffic congestion, the busses were supplied by the Ministry of Transportation with operational costs to the province's account.

Parsa said: “We are expecting to reach breakeven point after five years of operation. Up to the present, the provincial administration provides 
Rp 5 billion [US$438,000] in operational subsidies, while the total operational cost reaches Rp 8 billion per year.”

Future plans are to privatize, at least in part, the bus system. 

“With this scheme, it will be easier and more flexible for the management to run the operation. Relying on government subsidies will be quite complicated due to the strict 
bureaucracy,” Parsa explained.

The current fare is Rp 3,500 (30 US cents) per journey that covers an air-conditioned journey from Batubulan to Nusa Dua, on the system's longest route. A taxi over the same distance could cost Rp. 150,000.

A survey conducted by Udayana University showed that only 6% of the respondents has actually ridden the Trans-Sarbagita system. Reasons given for not using the bus included: uncertain schedules and the lack of seating for disabled and elderly passengers.

The system operates on corridors of service between Batubulan – Nusa Dua and Denpasar to Jimbaran. Plans are to extend service to an eventual 17 corridors. Trial operations have also commenced on a new Trans-Sarbagita service to Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

The estimated 8,000 people working at the airport and the many thousands of passengers who fly in and out of the airport each day could help add the additional passengers desperately needed to make the bus system viable.

Officials estimate private vehicle ownership in Bali increases 12% each year adding to the growing congestion of Bali's roadways.


 


American Woman Dies in Bali Road Accident
Alexandra Garce of Atlanta, Georgia Killed When Struck from Behind on Denpasar-Gilimanuk Highway

A 29-year-old American Woman Alexandra Garce from Atlanta, Georgia was killed in a traffic accident on the Denpasar-Gilimanuk road on Monday, October 7, 2013.

The accident happened when the woman who was driving a motorcycle in the direction of Gilimanuk stopped suddenly to avoid hitting another motorcycle mishap only to be hit from behind by a truck and thrown into the patch of an approaching truck.

The woman reportedly suffered massive head trauma and died at the location of the accident.

Garce lived at Jalan Hayum Waruk No. 210X in Denpasar.

The driver of the truck that struck Garce from behind Samsul Arifin (59) from Bayuwangi, East Java was not injured in the accident and is being questioned by police in the road fatality.

 


Lord, Love a Duck
Bali Update Editors Shares a Balinese Tale of Religious Ritual and the Day He Got Given a Duck by God

ober 12, 2013, the staff of Bali Discovery organized a traditional  Dewa Yadnya Ceremony at its offices located in the Sanur district of Bali.

In Bali Hinduism an Upacara Dewa Yadnya is an act of thanksgiving to the Almighty Hyang Widhi - in all His various manifestations, intended to seek blessings and divine guidance in all future endeavors.

For the blessing at the Bali Discovery offices, days of careful preparations went into making sure that the ceremony and accompanying offerings would meet with God’s approval. Once a propitious day was selected, bamboo stands were erected to elevate on altars the High priest (pedanda) and the many offerings.
f the parking lot was excavated creating a pit to receive sacrificial offerings of dead ducks and chickens. Elaborate platters of cakes, suckling pig, confectionaries, cigarettes and fruits were prepared. Holy water was transported to the location and mats laid out for the gamelan orchestra.

At the appointed time, the Pedanda arrived wearing an elaborate gold encrusted mitre that would make a senior abbot envious. He began a program of prayers, chants and mantras recited in ancient Sanskrit. The orchestra played, conch shells were blown, bells and chimes rung, and several circuits of the office made by the devoted sprinkling holy water and chanting along the way to exorcise any lingering omens of ill will.

Lord, Love a Duck

eremony progressed, I encountered a forlorn looking Balinese duckling, its bobbing head protruding from a small plastic bag placed among a pile of offerings. Quacking loudly, the duck tried to survey the busy surroundings,  unaware that she was just moments away from a beheading and dismemberment, soon to be tossed into an offering pit with the carcasses of equally unfortunate chickens.

Weaned on a childhood diet of Donald and Daisy Duck courtesy of the Disney organization, I have been trained since childhood to view all ducks as adorable creatures capable of human speech. As a result, this forlorn duckling was, to my eyes, a genuine charmer. Moved also by feelings of guilt and pity, I was soon stroking Daisy’s head and providing her with final cooling refreshment from a bottle of Aqua.

A coward at heart, I excused myself from the religious proceedings and entered the office, unable and unprepared to witness poor Daisy’s demise under the knife.

As the ceremony ended, I gingerly walked out of the office to thank the priest and his suppporters for their service.  Casting an eye down into the sacrificial pit, I saw the white feathers, blood and dismembered  parts of several sacrificed chickens. Holding my breath and determined to say farewell to my new-found feathered friend, I lingered, looking for the soft yellow down of Daisy the Duck that I had lovingly stroked just minutes before.

But, try as I might, there was no yellow down to be seen inside the pit.

A female acolyte approached from the middle of the crowd and handed me a quacking and still very much alive Daisy the Duck. Apparently, my minstrations to the duck had not escaped the notice of the High Priest who, via his direct line to God, had decided Daisy could be spared and offered to me.

To cut to the chase, Daisy has now become part of my household in North Sanur, Bali. The gardener, Kadek - a farm boy, is delighted and has immediately familairized Daisy with the swimming pool. The rest of my household, comprised of three dogs named Juju, Pumpkin and Rocky - seem less enthusiastic about Daisy's arrival, plotting, I suspect, their own reception for the duckling if given half a chance. 
 
As every Balinese knows, the Island operates on a never-ending cycle of good and bad Kharma. Bali Discovery’s offerings to Hyang Widhi were intended to secure the Kharma of a safe and prosperous passage through the months and years ahead for our team and the customers we serve. The kind intervention of a Balinese priest was a piece of remarkable Kharma for Daisy who went home with the guy with the water bottle. My own unfolding Kharma of both good and bad sees me integrating a household of three dogs, a rescued duck and a Balinese gardener who has just advised me that Daisy needs a Donald Duck to make her life complete.

A visit to the Duck Market is scheduled for early in the week.

Oh, dear Lord, love a duck!

Shown on Balidiscovery.com are photos of Daisy and the Upacara Dewa Yadnya.


A Final Curtain
Kadek Suardana – Master of Balinese Theater and Dance Dead at 57

Bali has lost its second leading contemporary dancer and artistic director to pancreatic cancer in as many months with the death of I Kadek Suardana on Tuesday, October 8, 2013, in Guangzhou, China, where he was undergoing treatment.

In August, Bali mourned the loss of  a leading contemporary dancer, Nyoman Sura, also claimed by pancreatic cancer.

Suardana, aged 57, had led many artistic groups on international visits during the course of his career. He has worked as a musical arranger, the composer of Balinese dance-drama, and the producer/director of many international tours of Bali performance groups.

Married to Mari Nabeshima, who was originally from Japan and who preceded him in death in 2010, Suardana had undergone five separate treatments for pancreatic cancer in China over the past two years.

The father of two daughters, Suardana's final trip to China was undertaken only a week before his death, accompanied by members of his late wife’s family.

Suardana, who was an acknowledged expert in the traditional Balinese performing arts, undertook early training in stage production in Jakarta. However, much of his career focused on contemporary theatre. He also completed a musical education at Traditional Music Conservatory (KOKAR) and studied dance at the Indonesian Dance Academy (ASTI).

Collaborating with I Dewa Gede Palguna, Aryantha Soetama and Ulf Gadd he established the Arti Foundation in 1998. His work with the foundation paved the way for a range of performances on local, national and international stages, including the Art of Peace Festival in 2002; Umbul-Umbul Festival in 2004 and a number of artistic missions abroad.

His monumental theatrical productions include: Dancing Demons produced with Australians from The Extra One Company in 1990; Bima – a collaboration with Sweden’s Goetenberg Opera Ballet in 1996; Gumbuh Macbeth (1998);  composed the soundtrack for Api Cinta - a film production relating the life of Antonio Blanco in 1998; Ritus Legong (2002); Tajen I (2002); Tajen II (2006) and Sri Tanjung – The Scent of Innocence (2009).

Reated Article

Tripping the Light Fantastic


Less We Forget
Ceremony at ‘Ground Zero’ to Commemorate 11th Anniversary of Bali Bombing. Australian PM Announces Terrorist Compensation Program.

On October 12, 2013, surviving family members from among the Indonesians who died in the terrorist attack of on a Bali nightspot on October 12, 2002 gathered at the Bali Bombing Memorial, also known as “Ground Zero” to scatter flower petals and recall the names and lives of the 202 people who died.

This year’s gathering was organized by the Istana Dewata Foundation. The chairperson of the Foundation, Ni Luh Erniyati, told the State News Agency Antara, “Every year we commemorate the moment, even though in a simple manner due to limited funds.”

After the scattering of flowers, prayers were offered and poems recited before a group photo closed the gathering.

I Wayan Radmi, whose husband Made Sujana died in the bombing, said: “At the time my husband worked as a security guard at the Sari Club. I and my family were shocked to hear of the bombing from my sister-in-law who worked at one of the nightspots in Kuta.”

He also had the gruesome memory of how only portions of her husband’s body were sent to the family in envelopes from the Denpasar General Hospital.

“Because the process of identification was time consuming, our family decided to cremate (my husband). After a while, we received a portion of my husband’s body positively identified by DNA tests,” she explained.

Tony Abbott Visits Ground Zero

During an official visit to Bali to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference (APEC) Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott visited the “Ground Zero” monument to lay a commemorate wreath.

Abbott said he came to the bombing site tom “Honor the dead, to commiserate with those who were injured on that night and who still bear the scars, physical and mental”.

88 Australians were counted among the 202 who died in the bombing.

The Australian Prime Minister used the occasion of his visit, just days before the 11th anniversary of the tragedy, to announce a compensation scheme for the victims of overseas terror attacks. The scheme provides for AU$75,000 in compensation to be paid to the next-of-kin of the Australians who died in the blast.

The compensation program, the culmination of a plan originally forwarded by former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, can be sought via an application process commencing on October 21, 2013. Gillard’s plan envisioned compensating only future victims of terrorism while Abbott has chosen to make compensation to also apply to Australians who are past victims of terror.


All We are Saying: Give Peace a Park
Plans Restarted to Build Peace Park at Sari Club Bali Bombing Site

cation of the former Sari Club, destroyed by a terrorist bomb on October 12, 2002, to become a memorial park have resurfaced again.

The bombing leveled the Sari Club and badly damaged Paddy’s Bar, located a short distance away, leaving 202 dead and scores badly injured.

Past efforts to build a park in the now vacant plot of land have been thwarted by land ownership and funding issues.

Djinaldi Gosana, the spokesman for the Bali Peace Park (Taman Perdamaian Bali) in Kuta told the State News Agency Antara on Saturday, October 12, 2013: “Through the construction of this park we hope to commemorate the event. For foreigners this is very important, especially for those who lost family members.”

The latest plan for the park included a place of worship for Moslems, Catholics, Protestants, Hindus and Buddhist. “This is the concept we which to put forward as an response to those who wanted to use the bombing to destroy national unity," said Djinaldi.

Australian Made Wijaya has been selected to design the park. He says the park will draw its inspiration from an Australian arts group who plant tens of bamboo in such a manner that they create a wind-chime effect.

Wijaya told the press that the wind-chime at the Bali Peace Park would be made of metal for durability. A garden wall will feature the names of the 202 who died in the Bali bombing.


Built for the Long Haul
Renovated Bali Airport Designed to Handle 16 Million Yearly Passengers

The renovated Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali when completed will be able to handle a yearly flow of 16 million passengers, more than doubling its former estimated capacity of 7.7 million.

Bisnis.com quotes the director of the airport management company, PT Angkasa Pura I, Tommy Soetomo, who said that now the APEC Conference is over the new international departure terminal is ready for use.

“On Tuesday, October 8 at 8:00 pm passengers flying internationally from Bali were able to fly from the new international departure terminal in Bali,” said Soetomo.

Prior to October 8th and commencing from September 29, 2013, only Garuda Indonesia passengers were allowed to use the new terminal. With the trial period ending on October 8, now all passengers flying internationally from Bali travel via the new terminal.

Occupying the entire third floor of the building, departing passengers are served by 96 check-in counters, 26 immigration counters, 9 departure lounges and 11 air bridges.

Soetomo said that over the past six years the Bali Airport has recorded an annual growth in passenger usage of 14% per year.


Rainy Days and Monday
Bali’s Rainy Season Gradually Embraces the Island

The Denpasar office of Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BKMG) is predicting that the rainy season in Bali will start gradually in October, encompass all of Bali by December and reach its peak in February.

The BKMG breaks down the Bali weather map into 15 zones.

According to BKMG, the rainy season began in September in parts of Tabanan, Ginayar, the middle of Badung and a part of Bangli.

During the first to third weeks of October the rainy season will commence in the southern portions of Jembrana, parts of Tabanan, eastern Buleleng, eastern and northern Gianyar, northwest Bangli.

The region of Bali receiving the least rainfall is the Nusa Penida islands, receiving rain for only 3 months of the year due to reasons of topography and the low amount of vegetative cover.

Meanwhile, Tabanan traditionally receives the largest amount of rainfall in Bali, reflected in the high level of rice cultivation found in that region.


Birds of a Feather in Bali
Bali Bird Park – a Center for the Conservation and Propagation of Rare Bird Species

A number of protected bird species make their home at the Bali Bird Park in Singapdu, in the Gianyar regency of Bali.

Quoted in Bisnis Bali, Nick Blackbeard, the Managing Director of the Bali Bird Park said: “Dedicated to the conservation of endangered birds, we operate a comprehensive breeding program. This is proven by our success in propagating Bali’s rarest bird the Jalak Bali.”

The Jalak Bali, also know as the Bali Starling or Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi) is the mascot of Bali and boasts a white tail, a long, drooping crest and black tops on the wings and tails. Particularly distinctive are the blue bare skin surrounding its eyes, grayish legs and a yellow beak.

The Bali Bird Park occupies a 2-hectare site attracting hundreds of visitors each day to it magnificent exhibit of more than 250 species spread across 1,000 birds.

The intelligent use of native foliage, waterfalls, ponds and walk-through cages gives every impression that visitors are in a tropical jungle rich with bird life.

“Visitors have the opportunity of encountering rare and extraordinary birds from every corner of the globe,” said Blackbeard.

Nick described how former rice fields were converted into a bird reserve with the help of experts from around the world, resulting in a habitant for the birds closely resembling the bird’s native surroundings.

Visitors walking its shaded tropical paths can see Jalak Bali, Macaws, Hornbills, Australian Pelicans, Birds of Paradise, Toucans, Owls, Flamingos, Cassowaries and Komodo Dragons.

The presence of the Komodo dragon in the Bali Bird Park is explained by Nick who said that evolution studies shows birds descended from reptiles, inspiring the Park's choice to adopt the Komodo as a mascot of the Park.

Several of the birds at the Park have been enriched, training them to welcome guests in a variety of languages.

Opportunities are also given for guest to hold and be photographed with rare birds.

The Bali Bird Park was first established in 1994.

Visiting the Bali Bird Park


Run for Someone Else’s Life
Join the 13th Chpater of Rock n’ Run on Kuta Beach on November 3, 2013 to Help the Bali Pink Ribbon Women's Cancer Center

On Sunday, November 3, 2013, Hard Rock Hotel Bali will partner with the Bali Pink Ribbon Campaign in this year’s edition of the Rock ‘n Run Fun race.

Proceeds from the eun will help the Pink Ribbon Breast Women's Cancer Center in Bali.

Participants in the race will receive a limited edition Hard Rock-New Balance T-shirt, refreshment and Simpati phone cards with a stored value of Rp. 10,000.

5 KM race STARTS AT 5:00 am.

Registration is Rp. 125,000 until November 2, 2013. Registration on race day costs Rp. 175,000.

A beach bazaar, fun runs and kids sprint will also be organized.

The winner of the 5 km race will win 30,000 AirAsia Miles exchangeable for a round trip fare Bali to Hong Kong.

For more information Email 

Register on Facebook 


 
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June 19, 2006

Bali Update #509
June 12, 2006

Bali Update #508
June 05, 2006

Bali Update #507
May 29, 2006

Bali Update #506
May 22, 2006

Bali Update #505
May 15, 2006

Bali Update #504
May 08, 2006

Bali Update #503
May 01, 2006

Bali Update #502
April 24, 2006

Bali Update #501
April 17, 2006
 

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